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  Topic Review (Newest First)
August 30th, 2015 08:50 PM
WickedSnake00 After you waste a couple weeks cutting a rewilding the flanges to be correct, and surfacing them within 0.005" of true, you can get back to work. I bolted them on with some copper RTV between the flange and Felpro gaskets. I used the stage 8 locking header bolts and tightened accordingly. All the threads were chased and lubed to prevent any crossthreading.

The balancer goes on like anything else. Dab of grey RTV in the keyway and pull it on with an installer, NOT THE BOLT. Learned that the hard way before.

Once you get it off the stand you can get to the backside. Pound in the one oil galley plug (with a little RTV if you're paranoid as fuck.)


Put a bead of grey RTV around the edge and install the rear cover. Let it sit a couple hours to set up and torque to spec. Install the oil seal. I cut a piece of PVC to size to drive it in square. I also put the dust cover in.

I then replaced the pilot bearing. I packed the cavity with soap and pushed it out with a dowel. Much easier to clean than grease. Drive the new one in flush with a block.

IMPORTANT: Put the spacer plate on before the flywheel.

Then put the flywheel on. Orient it correctly, thread in the bolts with a touch of Loctite, and torque to spec. Put your friction disc in with the alignment tool, followed by the pressure plate. Buy new clutch bolts because you're an idiot and forgot where the fuck yours went because your piece of shit has been sitting idle for so long. Slowly draw the pressure plate in, ensuring it stays square and the fingers stay flat, skipping around and only going a turn or two at a time. When it bottoms out, torque to spec.

Once that's done, put the transmission on. Inspect the clutch fork, TOB, and pivot stud. Mine had less than 500mi on them so they were good to go. Install the transmission, wiggling that stupid thing like hell to get it to seat FULLY. Don't draw it on with bolts. Get it flush against the block before you put the bolts in and torqued to spec.

BAM. Ready to throw in a car. Adding other accessories is optional and depends on your car and configuration.

You should have something like this:


Hopefully your engine doesn't grenade when you start it.
December 20th, 2014 01:48 PM
1996 GT
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalBoy101 View Post
As long as we're beating this horse to death, heres one more blow-

If you use a lot of moly assembly lube its a good idea to swap the oil filter after the initial fire up. If you used a lot of moly it can partially plug up the filter, causing it to go into bypass mode and not do any filtering.
Oil changed after 100 miles lol. Next one was 500, then 1000, then normal changes after that.
December 20th, 2014 01:32 PM
CalBoy101 As long as we're beating this horse to death, heres one more blow-

If you use a lot of moly assembly lube its a good idea to swap the oil filter after the initial fire up. If you used a lot of moly it can partially plug up the filter, causing it to go into bypass mode and not do any filtering.
December 20th, 2014 01:27 PM
1996 GT Well I used it on the bolts too, I just used it on the bearings as well. I guess thats part of learning though. Reguardless though it runs fantastic. Great oil pressure, has made I think 12 passes down the 1/4 last year. Aslong as I had something in there and aslong as it wasnt dry lol.
December 20th, 2014 01:22 PM
Bottledgt Yeah..arp lube comes with bolt kits for a reason...lol
December 20th, 2014 01:15 PM
1996 GT Well shit lol, I used the grey moly ARP lube on all my bearings hahahaha. Worked mint though, no issues and great oil pressure after 12.5k miles lol.


This to be exact. I feel dumb as shit now, I really should have read the label.
December 20th, 2014 01:09 PM
WickedSnake00
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1996 GT View Post
I dont think theyre TTY? Ive never had a additional degree to torque to on mine...? Now im wondering lol.

As for assembly lube, ARP moly is what I prefer. Not worth the risk of damaging bearings/crank for a 10$ bottle IMO.
According to the manual it's 33 ft-lb +60 deg. The old SBF ones are non-TTY though.

Just to clarify, ARP moly lube isn't what I'd call assembly lube. It comes in a packet and you use it to get an accurate torque reading when installing fasteners, as you'll be more accurately measuring the tension on the fastener rather than the friction on the threads.

Assembly lube is usually red and comes in a bottle, and that's what you slather bearing surfaces in during assembly. It's meant for bearing surfaces until adequate oil flow is established, not for fasteners.

Now just to close out the big blow up of assembly lube vs no assembly lube debate, it usually isn't a make or break situation. You're just protecting from a small amount of wear on initial start. We're talking a relatively small amount of wear; not like it will weld itself together. You might get a little larger window of catching it not building oil pressure without damage, but again, small impact. I would much rather be safe than sorry though.

You can build an engine in your driveway without assembly lube, cleaning components or even a torque wrench, but I'd much rather stack the deck in my favor as much as possible.
December 20th, 2014 12:08 PM
crackpotfox This is so stupid. Just because a tool works doesn't mean its the correct one for the job.
December 20th, 2014 10:30 AM
Bottledgt
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSG Pate View Post
Don't get your panties in a bunch..

If you've done this 100 times then you would know the only safe way to go is with assembly lube to ensure maximum lubrication.
NO...what i know is it really doesnt matter,as long as its got lube.
December 20th, 2014 02:34 AM
1996 GT
Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedSnake00 View Post
After a nice little bit of much desired rest, I got the header flanges sanded down. They look even to the eye, and are less than 0.010" out of true, which should be plenty with those thick Felpro gaskets.

I also just remembered I need a new set of pressure plate bolts since those are TTY.
I dont think theyre TTY? Ive never had a additional degree to torque to on mine...? Now im wondering lol.

As for assembly lube, ARP moly is what I prefer. Not worth the risk of damaging bearings/crank for a 10$ bottle IMO.
December 19th, 2014 11:22 PM
SSG Pate
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bottledgt View Post
A damn joke.lol. Tell me again how something ive done a hundred times doesnt work.oil is not going to drain away when sandwiched between a bearing. I use assembly lube mostly,but i run out alot. It really hasnt made a difference either way
Don't get your panties in a bunch..

If you've done this 100 times then you would know the only safe way to go is with assembly lube to ensure maximum lubrication.
December 19th, 2014 11:12 PM
Bottledgt A damn joke.lol. Tell me again how something ive done a hundred times doesnt work.oil is not going to drain away when sandwiched between a bearing. I use assembly lube mostly,but i run out alot. It really hasnt made a difference either way
December 19th, 2014 07:51 PM
SSG Pate Tolerances on both new and old could go either way depending on how the motor was assembled and the authors skills.

Use assembly lube this will protect the parts on initial startup and give you some time to build the oil pressure. If you use oil which is a damn joke it will drain away unlike Assembly lube which is much thicker in viscosity and will stay in place and lubricate the rotating parts.

If your oil pressure does not build almost instantly after initial startup then there is some sort of issue somewhere in the system such as a clogged or blocked pickup tube. It should not take a few seconds to build oil pressure after an oil change.
December 19th, 2014 07:42 PM
Bottledgt
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lariat View Post
False. On new unworn parts the tolerances are much tighter. And seeing how most of your bearings are friction bearings you need the higher lubricity from the assembly lube. Not always does oil pressure come instantly. I had a 2v in an old truck of mine that wouldn't get oIL pressure for a good 5-10 seconds upon starting after an oil change. Imaging what a dry engine is like. Also, assembly lube doesn't drip and drain out like standard oil. Yes there will always be some there, but not enough to float the crank or cams.
Not false. True life events. Been doing it for years. Weird. Always works
December 19th, 2014 01:53 PM
Austin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swift View Post
I thought diesel mechanics just took turns licking the bearings before they go in
It's like your mom, everyone just spits on it before turning her over.
December 19th, 2014 01:05 PM
Lariat
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swift View Post
I thought diesel mechanics just took turns licking the bearings before they go in
maybe...
December 19th, 2014 12:59 PM
Swift
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lariat View Post
False. On new unworn parts the tolerances are much tighter. And seeing how most of your bearings are friction bearings you need the higher lubricity from the assembly lube. Not always does oil pressure come instantly. I had a 2v in an old truck of mine that wouldn't get oIL pressure for a good 5-10 seconds upon starting after an oil change. Imaging what a dry engine is like. Also, assembly lube doesn't drip and drain out like standard oil. Yes there will always be some there, but not enough to float the crank or cams.
I thought diesel mechanics just took turns licking the bearings before they go in
December 19th, 2014 12:55 PM
Lariat
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bottledgt View Post
Assembly lube is fine, but i use engine oil all the time. It will be fine regardless which. Never had an issue in the many years ive done it. Oil pressure comes almost instantly anyway, so it really doesnt matter
False. On new unworn parts the tolerances are much tighter. And seeing how most of your bearings are friction bearings you need the higher lubricity from the assembly lube. Not always does oil pressure come instantly. I had a 2v in an old truck of mine that wouldn't get oIL pressure for a good 5-10 seconds upon starting after an oil change. Imaging what a dry engine is like. Also, assembly lube doesn't drip and drain out like standard oil. Yes there will always be some there, but not enough to float the crank or cams.
December 19th, 2014 01:41 AM
Bottledgt Assembly lube is fine, but i use engine oil all the time. It will be fine regardless which. Never had an issue in the many years ive done it. Oil pressure comes almost instantly anyway, so it really doesnt matter
December 18th, 2014 08:13 PM
WickedSnake00
Quote:
Originally Posted by McLuvin01 View Post
This may be a stupid question, but what assembly lube are you using? I ask because I'm about to do the same build basically. I built a 5.0 roller engine for a fox and everyone was totally against assembly lube. My teksid is gonna have to sit for a bit while I get the rest of the car ready. So I would think the lube would be the way to go? And maybe get off your arse and post some progress?
For assembly lube I used the Permatex brand stuff. I don't think I've ever heard anyone say that assembly lube was a bad idea. Some guys get away with using something like 30W or heavier oil on everything, but that's usually more of a shadetree mechanic building SBC's for his El Camino.

Of course that's for the bearing surfaces, not the cylinders. Cylinders you should just use straight motor oil.

And if you're referring to the moly lube for fasteners I use the ARP stuff. It also can be substituted with 30W, but moly is more accurate.

I'd love to get off my ass and finish it, but my hands are tied at the moment. The long block is more or less done, but if you've been following the car build thread the flanges to my headers are incorrect; they're off by about 1/2." If I bolted them up it would blow out the gasket in an instant. The fabricator has offered to make me a new set, but that won't happen until early January.

Back to waiting.

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