Modded Mustang Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,930 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are the differences between the two models. I understand that there is no intercooler w/ the GT Turbo and due to this, the turbo is slightly different between the two. I also have read that there are a few different intakes Ford used on the varying turbo vehicles they released in the mid-80s. What are the other differences? I'm having a hard time finding this out because 90% of the sites I've found say 1/2 a sentence about a GT Turbo and then several paragraphs or more about the SVO, lol. Thanks, guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Were the GT Turbos carbed cars? I wish I knew more about these cars. Those things were sexy as hell and they should have made more of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,930 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Were the GT Turbos carbed cars? I wish I knew more about these cars. Those things were sexy as hell and they should have made more of them.
i dont believe they were. i think i read somewhere that ford realized they got better performance outta the 2.3 w/ e.f.i.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Boy... I can't imagine these cars are still even around today???
 

·
2008 Hammock Rodeo Champ
Joined
·
1,227 Posts
i may be resurecting an oldy here but... whatever.

information was found at HowStuffWorks.com


The 1983 Ford Mustang Turbo GT

Accompanying the reborn 1983 Ford Mustang convertible to showrooms as a midyear addition was the 1983 Ford Mustang Turbo GT.

The Turbo GT came in hatchback and convertible form and with a reengineered version of the turbocharged "Lima" 2.3-liter four-cylinder developed for the slick new 1983 Thunderbird Turbo Coupe.


Ford revived a "blown" Mustang in mid-'83, but the mechanically improved
four-cylinder Turbo GT was a poor seller, being slower and costlier than
the similar V-8 GTs.

The principal changes here involved junking the carburetor for Bosch port electronic fuel injection and positioning the turbocharger upstream of the induction system so as to "blow through" it rather than "draw down" from it. Also new was Ford's latest EEC-IV electronic engine control system, which governed injector timing, idle speed, wastegate operation, supplementary fuel enrichment, engine idle, and emissions control.

Other upgrades included forged-aluminum pistons, valves made of a special temperature-resistant alloy, lighter flywheel, die-cast aluminum rocker cover, and an engine-mounted oil cooler. Per usual turbo practice, compression was lowered from 9.0:1 to 8.0:1, and premium unleaded fuel was recommended for best performance. The result: 145 horsepower at 4600 rpm -- only 5 horsepower more than the previous version, but better than the magic "1 horsepower per cubic inch" ideal for this 140-cube mill. Torque was 180 lb-ft peaking at a relatively low 3600 rpm.

Aside from different nameplates, Turbo GTs were visual twins to the V-8 versions. All came with black exterior moldings, beefy Eagle GT performance radials, aluminum wheels, sport bucket seats, and five-speed manual gearbox. Suspension was tuned to match engine weight and power characteristics.

Despite its small size, the turbo-four packed the same horsepower advertised for the base 1983 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 V-8. With that, the revived Turbo Mustang could run 0-60 mph in well under 10 seconds and the standing quarter-mile in about 16 seconds, and return 25 mpg overall. But the T-Bird Turbo Coupe could match all those numbers, and the fortified 5.0-liter Mustang now flew to 60 in near six seconds flat.


The '83 Turbo GT didn't capture sales, probably because of its price. Turbos
were $250 more than comparable V-8 GTs, yet the V-8s were faster.

Tough to Drive, and to Sell

Although it seemed to offer the best of both worlds, the improved Mustang Turbo GT laid a sales egg. The lack of available automatic transmission and air conditioning probably cost more than a few sales, but the real problem was price. The Turbos started some $250 above comparably equipped V-8 GTs, yet they were slower. Also, their peaky engine was relatively weak on low-rpm torque, so it had to be caned most all the time.

The V-8, by contrast, was a traditional, relatively lazy American engine with muscular low-end thrust, and it just loafed along easily at highway speeds. Ford said a late introduction and slow production ramp-up limited Turbo GT sales, and only 483 of the '83s were built. But the real damper is best expressed by that time-worn Detroit adage: There's no substitute for cubic inches. Not even high technology.

Ford's Special Vehicle Operations unit unveiled the Mustang SVO in 1984, which was basically a Turbo GT hatchback with racing-inspired modifications. To learn all the details about the Mustang SVO, keep reading.





The 1984 Ford Mustang SVO

The 1984 Ford Mustang Turbo GT suffered poor sales and was cast as a performance underachiever, but that didn't turn Ford away from the turbo faith. Witness the 1984 Ford Mustang SVO.

Fearing a deepening of the energy crisis (which didn't materialize), Ford massaged its 2.3-liter turbo-four even more for '84. The result was a very different performance pony, the 1984 Ford Mustang SVO.


The 1984 Ford Mustang SVO was a modified Turbo GT hatchback, fine-tuned
with an eye for racing.

Engineered by Ford's recently formed Special Vehicle Operations unit (hence the name), this was basically a Turbo GT hatchback with enough modifications to satisfy the most confirmed devotees of European machinery.

Notable was the first air-to-air intercooler in American production. This chilled the pressurized air for a denser, more powerful charge. A world first was electronic control to vary boost pressure, which could reach 14 pounds per square inch, said to be the highest of any production turbo engine to that point. There was even a cockpit switch for "tuning" the engine electronics to allow running on regular or premium-grade fuel.

With these and other racing-inspired ideas, maximum horsepower jumped by a claimed 20 percent to 175 at 4500 rpm versus the 1983 Mustang Turbo GT. Torque increased some 10 percent to 210 pound-feet at 3000 rpm. Putting it to the ground was a five-speed manual gearbox with special Hurst linkage driving to a Traction-Lok limited-slip differential with 3.45:1 final drive.


The SVO program had three tasks: to develop and manage various motorsports
programs, to expand Ford's racing and high-performance parts business, and to
develop hot limited-edition street cars.

SVO chassis revisions were no less thorough. The 9.0-inch rear drum brakes of other Mustangs were swapped for beefy 11.25-inch-diameter discs, and the front discs swelled from 10.06 to 10.92 inches across. New "aero-style" cast-aluminum wheels measuring 16 3 7 inches wore V-rated European Goodyear NCT radials, later exchanged for P225/50VR16 Goodyear Eagle GT50s with unidirectional "gatorback" tread (as on the '84 Corvette).

Spring rates and bushings were stiffened, premium Koni adjustable shocks replaced the stock dampers, the front antiroll bar was thickened (from 0.94 to 1.20 inches), and a rear bar was added along with an extra inch of front wheel travel. The stock rack-and-pinion power steering went from variable-ratio to fast constant-ratio gearing but retained high-effort valving to optimize road feel.

Last but not least was "Quadra-Shock," a nifty idea borrowed from the T-Bird Turbo Coupe (and easily adapted from that Fox-based relative). The name referred to an extra pair of shock absorbers sitting almost horizontally astride the differential between the axle and the body structure. The idea was to minimize jittery axle "tramp" in hard acceleration, and it worked. Intriguingly, Quadra-Shock had been sort of promised for the V-8 GT back in '82 but was delayed for various reasons that are still not entirely clear.

Unfortunately for Ford, the overpriced Mustang SVO was doomed to be a sales failure. On the next page, find out what went wrong for the SVO.


Driving the 1984 Ford Mustang SVO

One thing was clear: The Ford Mustang SVO was definitely not your father's pony car. Setting it apart were a distinctive "biplane" rear spoiler made of polycarbonate plastic, a specific grille-less nose (engine air entered from below the bumper and through a small slot above).

A large hood air scoop fed the intercooler, and dual square headlamps replaced the normal Mustang's smaller quads. A deep front air dam incorporated standard foglamps, and small fairings at the leading edges of the rear wheel openings helped smooth airflow around the fat tires.


The SVO was a driver's car, drawing rave reviews from enthusiasts and experts.

Inside, the SVO boasted such driver-oriented accoutrements as a left "dead pedal" footrest, relocated brake and accelerator pedals for easier heel-and-toe shifting, an 8000-rpm tachometer, turbo-boost gauge, and multi-adjustable seats like those in the T-Bird Turbo Coupe. Also included were electric rear-window defroster, tinted glass, AM/FM stereo radio with speaker/amplifier system, leather-rim tilt steering wheel, and the familiar Mustang console with graphic warning display. Only six major options were listed: air, power windows, cassette player, flip-up glass sunroof, and leather upholstery.

The SVO was an enthusiast's dream come true. Handling was near-neutral, cornering flat and undramatic, steering direct and properly weighted, braking swift and sure. Performance? Exhilarating for the day, with 0-60 mph in about 7.5 seconds, the quarter-mile in just under 16 seconds at around 90 mph, and top speed near 135 mph.


The SVO's interior featured the familiar Mustang console, along with adjustable
seats, tinted glass, and a leather-rim tilt steering wheel.

Road & Track, long an advocate of Euro-style American cars, was ecstatic. "Given the existing Mustang platform, the Ford SVO team could hardly have done a better job of improving [it] to world-class GT standards. Almost all of the things that R&T has stressed as important in a well balanced, universally drivable GT coupe have been incorporated [with] few serious compromises…. [The SVO is] suitable for sustained fast driving on any [road] you're likely to find…giving comfort and assurance all the while…. This may be the best all-around car for the enthusiast driver ever produced by the U.S. industry; we hope it's just the start of a new era."

But R&T was doomed to disappointment. So was Ford. In the end, the SVO it was just another sophisticated screamer that "buff books" liked and buyers didn't. And at over $16,000 out the door, it looked way too expensive next to the V-8 GT, which delivered similar style and sizzle for a whopping $6000-$7000 less. Ford thus retailed fewer than 4000 SVOs for model-year '84, though it had the capacity to build some four times that number.


In the end, the SVO was a sales disappointment. Ford retailed fewer than 4000
SVOs for model-year 1984.

Together, the V-8 and SVO killed off the Turbo GT after fewer than 3000 hatchbacks and about 600 convertibles were built for 1983-84. All early-'84 GTs, both V-8 and Turbo, were virtual '83 reruns except for a split rear seatback, also newly standard for most lesser hatchbacks, and substitution of solid front head restraints for the previous open type.

December 1983 brought several welcome changes, including Quadra-Shock rear suspension, a revised front spoiler, and closer SVO-style throttle and brake-pedal spacing to assist heel-and-toe artists. Keep reading to learn about the rest of the offerings in Ford's 1984 Mustang lineup.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,120 Posts
great info squint ive heard bout them but never knew much bout em
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,930 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i think that was one of the websites that i found about em
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,781 Posts
i may be resurecting an oldy here but... whatever.

information was found at HowStuffWorks.com


The 1983 Ford Mustang Turbo GT

Accompanying the reborn 1983 Ford Mustang convertible to showrooms as a midyear addition was the 1983 Ford Mustang Turbo GT.

The Turbo GT came in hatchback and convertible form and with a reengineered version of the turbocharged "Lima" 2.3-liter four-cylinder developed for the slick new 1983 Thunderbird Turbo Coupe.


Ford revived a "blown" Mustang in mid-'83, but the mechanically improved
four-cylinder Turbo GT was a poor seller, being slower and costlier than
the similar V-8 GTs.

The principal changes here involved junking the carburetor for Bosch port electronic fuel injection and positioning the turbocharger upstream of the induction system so as to "blow through" it rather than "draw down" from it. Also new was Ford's latest EEC-IV electronic engine control system, which governed injector timing, idle speed, wastegate operation, supplementary fuel enrichment, engine idle, and emissions control.

Other upgrades included forged-aluminum pistons, valves made of a special temperature-resistant alloy, lighter flywheel, die-cast aluminum rocker cover, and an engine-mounted oil cooler. Per usual turbo practice, compression was lowered from 9.0:1 to 8.0:1, and premium unleaded fuel was recommended for best performance. The result: 145 horsepower at 4600 rpm -- only 5 horsepower more than the previous version, but better than the magic "1 horsepower per cubic inch" ideal for this 140-cube mill. Torque was 180 lb-ft peaking at a relatively low 3600 rpm.

Aside from different nameplates, Turbo GTs were visual twins to the V-8 versions. All came with black exterior moldings, beefy Eagle GT performance radials, aluminum wheels, sport bucket seats, and five-speed manual gearbox. Suspension was tuned to match engine weight and power characteristics.

Despite its small size, the turbo-four packed the same horsepower advertised for the base 1983 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 V-8. With that, the revived Turbo Mustang could run 0-60 mph in well under 10 seconds and the standing quarter-mile in about 16 seconds, and return 25 mpg overall. But the T-Bird Turbo Coupe could match all those numbers, and the fortified 5.0-liter Mustang now flew to 60 in near six seconds flat.


The '83 Turbo GT didn't capture sales, probably because of its price. Turbos
were $250 more than comparable V-8 GTs, yet the V-8s were faster.

Tough to Drive, and to Sell

Although it seemed to offer the best of both worlds, the improved Mustang Turbo GT laid a sales egg. The lack of available automatic transmission and air conditioning probably cost more than a few sales, but the real problem was price. The Turbos started some $250 above comparably equipped V-8 GTs, yet they were slower. Also, their peaky engine was relatively weak on low-rpm torque, so it had to be caned most all the time.

The V-8, by contrast, was a traditional, relatively lazy American engine with muscular low-end thrust, and it just loafed along easily at highway speeds. Ford said a late introduction and slow production ramp-up limited Turbo GT sales, and only 483 of the '83s were built. But the real damper is best expressed by that time-worn Detroit adage: There's no substitute for cubic inches. Not even high technology.

Ford's Special Vehicle Operations unit unveiled the Mustang SVO in 1984, which was basically a Turbo GT hatchback with racing-inspired modifications. To learn all the details about the Mustang SVO, keep reading.





The 1984 Ford Mustang SVO

The 1984 Ford Mustang Turbo GT suffered poor sales and was cast as a performance underachiever, but that didn't turn Ford away from the turbo faith. Witness the 1984 Ford Mustang SVO.

Fearing a deepening of the energy crisis (which didn't materialize), Ford massaged its 2.3-liter turbo-four even more for '84. The result was a very different performance pony, the 1984 Ford Mustang SVO.


The 1984 Ford Mustang SVO was a modified Turbo GT hatchback, fine-tuned
with an eye for racing.

Engineered by Ford's recently formed Special Vehicle Operations unit (hence the name), this was basically a Turbo GT hatchback with enough modifications to satisfy the most confirmed devotees of European machinery.

Notable was the first air-to-air intercooler in American production. This chilled the pressurized air for a denser, more powerful charge. A world first was electronic control to vary boost pressure, which could reach 14 pounds per square inch, said to be the highest of any production turbo engine to that point. There was even a cockpit switch for "tuning" the engine electronics to allow running on regular or premium-grade fuel.

With these and other racing-inspired ideas, maximum horsepower jumped by a claimed 20 percent to 175 at 4500 rpm versus the 1983 Mustang Turbo GT. Torque increased some 10 percent to 210 pound-feet at 3000 rpm. Putting it to the ground was a five-speed manual gearbox with special Hurst linkage driving to a Traction-Lok limited-slip differential with 3.45:1 final drive.


The SVO program had three tasks: to develop and manage various motorsports
programs, to expand Ford's racing and high-performance parts business, and to
develop hot limited-edition street cars.

SVO chassis revisions were no less thorough. The 9.0-inch rear drum brakes of other Mustangs were swapped for beefy 11.25-inch-diameter discs, and the front discs swelled from 10.06 to 10.92 inches across. New "aero-style" cast-aluminum wheels measuring 16 3 7 inches wore V-rated European Goodyear NCT radials, later exchanged for P225/50VR16 Goodyear Eagle GT50s with unidirectional "gatorback" tread (as on the '84 Corvette).

Spring rates and bushings were stiffened, premium Koni adjustable shocks replaced the stock dampers, the front antiroll bar was thickened (from 0.94 to 1.20 inches), and a rear bar was added along with an extra inch of front wheel travel. The stock rack-and-pinion power steering went from variable-ratio to fast constant-ratio gearing but retained high-effort valving to optimize road feel.

Last but not least was "Quadra-Shock," a nifty idea borrowed from the T-Bird Turbo Coupe (and easily adapted from that Fox-based relative). The name referred to an extra pair of shock absorbers sitting almost horizontally astride the differential between the axle and the body structure. The idea was to minimize jittery axle "tramp" in hard acceleration, and it worked. Intriguingly, Quadra-Shock had been sort of promised for the V-8 GT back in '82 but was delayed for various reasons that are still not entirely clear.

Unfortunately for Ford, the overpriced Mustang SVO was doomed to be a sales failure. On the next page, find out what went wrong for the SVO.


Driving the 1984 Ford Mustang SVO

One thing was clear: The Ford Mustang SVO was definitely not your father's pony car. Setting it apart were a distinctive "biplane" rear spoiler made of polycarbonate plastic, a specific grille-less nose (engine air entered from below the bumper and through a small slot above).

A large hood air scoop fed the intercooler, and dual square headlamps replaced the normal Mustang's smaller quads. A deep front air dam incorporated standard foglamps, and small fairings at the leading edges of the rear wheel openings helped smooth airflow around the fat tires.


The SVO was a driver's car, drawing rave reviews from enthusiasts and experts.

Inside, the SVO boasted such driver-oriented accoutrements as a left "dead pedal" footrest, relocated brake and accelerator pedals for easier heel-and-toe shifting, an 8000-rpm tachometer, turbo-boost gauge, and multi-adjustable seats like those in the T-Bird Turbo Coupe. Also included were electric rear-window defroster, tinted glass, AM/FM stereo radio with speaker/amplifier system, leather-rim tilt steering wheel, and the familiar Mustang console with graphic warning display. Only six major options were listed: air, power windows, cassette player, flip-up glass sunroof, and leather upholstery.

The SVO was an enthusiast's dream come true. Handling was near-neutral, cornering flat and undramatic, steering direct and properly weighted, braking swift and sure. Performance? Exhilarating for the day, with 0-60 mph in about 7.5 seconds, the quarter-mile in just under 16 seconds at around 90 mph, and top speed near 135 mph.


The SVO's interior featured the familiar Mustang console, along with adjustable
seats, tinted glass, and a leather-rim tilt steering wheel.

Road & Track, long an advocate of Euro-style American cars, was ecstatic. "Given the existing Mustang platform, the Ford SVO team could hardly have done a better job of improving [it] to world-class GT standards. Almost all of the things that R&T has stressed as important in a well balanced, universally drivable GT coupe have been incorporated [with] few serious compromises…. [The SVO is] suitable for sustained fast driving on any [road] you're likely to find…giving comfort and assurance all the while…. This may be the best all-around car for the enthusiast driver ever produced by the U.S. industry; we hope it's just the start of a new era."

But R&T was doomed to disappointment. So was Ford. In the end, the SVO it was just another sophisticated screamer that "buff books" liked and buyers didn't. And at over $16,000 out the door, it looked way too expensive next to the V-8 GT, which delivered similar style and sizzle for a whopping $6000-$7000 less. Ford thus retailed fewer than 4000 SVOs for model-year '84, though it had the capacity to build some four times that number.


In the end, the SVO was a sales disappointment. Ford retailed fewer than 4000
SVOs for model-year 1984.

Together, the V-8 and SVO killed off the Turbo GT after fewer than 3000 hatchbacks and about 600 convertibles were built for 1983-84. All early-'84 GTs, both V-8 and Turbo, were virtual '83 reruns except for a split rear seatback, also newly standard for most lesser hatchbacks, and substitution of solid front head restraints for the previous open type.

December 1983 brought several welcome changes, including Quadra-Shock rear suspension, a revised front spoiler, and closer SVO-style throttle and brake-pedal spacing to assist heel-and-toe artists. Keep reading to learn about the rest of the offerings in Ford's 1984 Mustang lineup.

that said it all
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Boy... I can't imagine these cars are still even around today???
Oh yeah they are. :)

This is my sons first car bought with his own cash after a hard summers work.

1984 Mustang Gt T-top 4 cylinder turbo 5 speed. Everything still works and it runs great with 187k on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,930 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oh yeah they are. :)

This is my sons first car bought with his own cash after a hard summers work.

1984 Mustang Gt T-top 4 cylinder turbo 5 speed. Everything still works and it runs great with 187k on it.
cool, how's he like it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,930 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
He has had it since he was 14 and has just recently got his license.

I think you would need 2 sticks of dynamite and a huge pry bar to separate him from that car.
dang.. guess he likes it then :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I happened to pickup an 84 gt turbo (fi, but not intercooled) for $200, kicker is I'm getting it titled. Just wanted ya'll to know someone that owns one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I know someone here in NY selling a 1985 SVO that just needs a clutch to move.. It needs some work, but it runs. I think he is looking for less then 2 grand for it.. If anyone wants info PM me and i will get some pics, and some further info on it... The car is in the 11967 area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I was reading y'alls forum and had to say that I've owned my 84 gt turbo for a couple years and it is hands down one of my favorite cars. it is efi and i dont care what bad tings I've heard it is quick and maneuvers great. yea the turbo lags a little but it doesnt mess with the ride very much. mine is a convertible and the Texas weather makes it worth taking the car out with the top down. I LOVE THING CAR.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Another Texas 1984 GT Turbo convertible owner here!
I got an itch for a 5.0 5 speed fox body convertible a while back and guess what the first car I ran across was....$400....couldn't let it just sit there could I?
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top