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Who you callin' Pinhead?
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188 Posts
Discussion Starter #123
GODDAMMIT!!! FINALLY!!! The machine work for the engine is finally finished up! Hopefully...





Obviously, I’ve been on a long hiatus from posting in this thread. In that hiatus, I was dealing with / waiting on 2 different machine shops. I didn’t want to post here droning on and on about my difficulties of dealing with said 2 shops. Everyone would get tired of that real quickly. So, I’ll tell the whole story about my lack of progress now.

The first machine shop I dealt with back in January was run by a guy named Sean, AKA an asshole machinist / engine builder. He said that I couldn’t build an engine since I don’t have 20 years of engine-building experience behind me. Sean INSISTED that I let him build the short block, so out of fear and time constraints, I let him do so.

I got the short block back from Sean on January 29, about 3 weeks after I first gave it to him. He charged me $1000 for his services. I hauled the short block home, tore it apart (yeah yeah, smart move, I know), and I’ll admit, I was pretty disappointed. I wasn’t disappointed with Sean’s machine work though, it was real nice. All the measurements and clearances in the block checked out perfectly, the rotating assembly turned over easily, and the whole short block was coated for rust resistance. No, what I was disappointed with was Sean’s choice of parts in that short block.

The pistons that Sean put in the motor were just basic cast pistons. Not hypereutectic pistons like I had asked for. The front oil galley plugs were just the press-in type (just like mini freeze plugs) instead of the screw-in type. And what disappointed me most was that Sean never replaced the rod bolts in the stock connecting rods that he reused.

Now, the LOGICAL (more time-and-money-consuming) move would have been to haul that short block back to Sean’s shop and give him hell for building it the way he did. But I never did that since I didn’t want to see Sean again (shut up, I can already hear some of you screaming at me for giving my money / business to Sean). What I decided to do instead was order my own pistons, rods, and plugs (like I wanted to do in the first place), and find another machine shop to help me with whatever machine work would be needed.

I ordered the new engine parts and right away found another shop one town away from me. A machine shop called Rich’s Custom Engines in Basehor, KS. The owner, a man by the name of Rich Carle, was, for lack of a better word, FRIGGIN’ AWESOME!!! I told Rich the whole story about the bowl of anus pus known as Sean, my plan for the engine build that I’m doing, and my desire to build the engine myself. Rich actually listened to all of my ideas and the overall plan, while at the same time, offering input of his own.

When I was talking about Sean, Rich mentioned that Sean is probably what might be referred to as a “mass engine rebuilder.” As in, Sean probably just rebuilds engines to factory specs for vehicles that simply need to get back on the road, and the work always needs to be done cheaply and quickly (which helps explain Sean’s cheap parts usage and how he got the short block built so quickly). Sean probably doesn’t deal with people very much. Most of his business probably comes from generic auto repair shops whenever they get an order for an engine rebuild. Nothing’s wrong with the kind of business that Sean’s running, it’s just not the kind of business I need to help with my engine build.

Rich however, runs a different kind of business than Sean. Rich builds “custom” engines. Engines that are built FAR from stock specifications. Most of Rich’s business comes from building engines for dirt track cars. In other words, RACE ENGINES. So if this guy Rich could build wild race motors like he regularly does, then he could certainly build a mild street motor like mine.

What I liked most about dealing with Rich was that whenever I visited his shop (we consulted about things several times), we would always get off topic and into long conversations about stuff. Rich’s 25+ years of machine work, the 2 Ford Thunderbirds that he owns (Rich daily drives a Turbo Coupe and is building a dual-quad 393W for his 86 Thunderbird), his hatred for Ford’s modular motors, engine tech in general, etc. Unlike Sean, who thought it was best that I knew less about engine building / tech, Rich actually wanted to teach me the things that he knew about machining, building, and running an engine. I could tell that Rich clearly enjoys talking about and doing what he does, even though he works his ass off. I wanted to give my business to this guy.

So, on March 9, I dropped all of the engine parts off at Rich’s shop so that he could do his work. Yesterday on May 19, more than two months after I first gave the engine to him, I finally got the engine back from Rich, and he charged me only $200 for the work that he did to the block and rotating assembly. Sure, Rich had the motor for quite a while, but he’s busy as hell all the time since he does such good work. Rich and I loaded up the motor, and he said that I could come back to his shop any time for advice, more engine work, etc. I thanked Rich so much for his business, and said that I would come back to his shop once I get the cylinder heads for my engine.

I made my way home, unloaded all of the engine parts, and bagged them up for storage.





I would love to be able to tackle this short block right now, but final exams at school are a higher priority than this engine build. After finals are finished, my next step in the build here is painting the block. I've got everything I need for painting, and more engine parts are on the way.

---------- Post added at 11:11 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:05 AM ----------

The machine work that Sean did to the block seemed to be top-notch as far as I could tell. The cylinder bores all measured out at just a little over 4.030” so that a set of 4.030” pistons will fit in there with just a little clearance. The decks of the block were cleaned up, possibly milled. Sean also installed new steel freeze plugs, new cam bearings, and new press-in oil galley plugs. And finally, the outside of the block was painted black and all of the bores and sealing surfaces were coated in some sort of oil, both for rust resistance.





Rich did a few things to the block as well. First, because of piston-to-wall clearance issues, Rich had to slightly hone the cylinders out so that they would accept the new pistons. Secondly, Rich installed a new set of screw-in oil galley plugs in the front of the block. They won’t pop out and toast the motor like the press-in oil galley plugs that Sean used. Also, it appears that Rich ran a thread chaser through most of the bolt holes in the block. Head bolt holes, timing cover / water pump bolt holes, and oil pan bolt holes, all of them looked real clean. Finally, Rich got the block cleaned up a good bit better than Sean did. Apparently, there was some crap in the oil galleys left by Sean that Rich managed to clean out.

The screw-in oil galley plugs that Rich installed.

 

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Who you callin' Pinhead?
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188 Posts
Discussion Starter #125
The crankshaft was just polished up by Sean, and all of the main / rod journals are nice and shiny with no nicks, scratches, or gouges in them. The oil holes are also nice and chamfered.



Rich did balancing work to the crankshaft and rotating assembly. When I got the crank back from him, I could clearly tell that Rich had drilled out a few spots in the counterweights to equalize the weight of the piston / rod assemblies. This balancing isn’t necessarily a horsepower gain, but it’ll reduce engine vibrations and horsepower loss. To go along with it, Rich gave me a little balancing card showing the weights of each individual rotating assembly part along with the final recorded bob weight of 1726 grams.







---------- Post added at 11:43 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:36 AM ----------

I got rid of the old stock connecting rods that Sean put back in the motor. In their place, I purchased a set of stock replacement semi-floating Eagle I-beam rods. Not only are they brand new, but they also have 3/8” ARP rod bolts already installed.





I had Rich check oil clearances in the big end of the new rods, but surprisingly, with standard Clevite rod bearings and stock rod journal diameter, all of the oil clearances in the rods measured out at 0.020” which is right on the money for a Ford 302. Rich didn’t have to resize any of the rods at all.

---------- Post added at 11:50 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:43 AM ----------

Like Sean’s rod choice, I got rid of those cheap cast pistons he used and bought a set of Speed Pro (basically Sealed Power) hypereutectic cast pistons for a 4.030” bore. They came with a set of moly / cast iron rings as well. The rings should seat into the bores pretty quickly, and the newer hypereutectic pistons should be able to hold up to just about anything that’s thrown at them.



As I said before, the piston-to-wall clearance with these new pistons was a little tight. The piston-to-wall clearance spec for a Ford 302 engine is 0.003” to 0.005” but these new pistons had less than 0.001” piston-to-wall clearance. To remedy that, Rich honed out the cylinders a little bit so that the new pistons would have the proper clearance.

Since I bought the semi-floating connecting rods (no bronze bushing in the small end), Rich had to press the pistons onto the rods.



---------- Post added at 11:54 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:50 AM ----------

This is a 50 oz. harmonic balancer from Ford Racing, and it also came with a timing pointer. I bought an ARP balancer bolt for it as well.



I will admit, my first impression of this balancer wasn’t so great.

The paint flaked off of the edges pretty easily and the timing marks are kinda hard to see.



The inner rubber piece doesn’t look like it was installed right.



I’ll run this balancer for now, but I won’t be surprised if I’ll ever need to replace it.

---------- Post added at 11:57 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:54 AM ----------

I bought a stock replacement 50 oz. flywheel to go along with that 50 oz. balancer. I also bought some ARP bolts for it. Now I do know that Mustang 302 engines typically use 157-tooth flywheels, but I bought one with 164 teeth. I’ll explain more about my flywheel choice once I start getting into the bellhousing / clutch part of the build.

 

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Who you callin' Pinhead?
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188 Posts
Discussion Starter #126
I got started with painting the block today. First, I took about an hour to get all of the sealing surfaces masked off. I learned this masking trick in high school auto shop where you tape off whatever surface you don’t want to paint on, then take a hammer and LIGHTLY tap the sharp edges of the surface where there's excess tape. By doing this, I was able to mask the block off perfectly without any excess tape anywhere. I also put on a little oil filter to keep that spot dry, and I finished up the prep work by wiping down the previously painted surfaces with lacquer thinner to remove the oil and whatever other crap was on there.






First coat of Ford blue put down! I’ll wait a day or two for it to dry completely.



 

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Who you callin' Pinhead?
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188 Posts
Discussion Starter #128 (Edited)
Thats a neat trick on the tape. I've always had a hard time getting those edges to tear clean.
Yeah, it works real good. The hammer got in a few tight spots around the timing cover area, but on longer edges, like the deck surfaces and the oil pan surface, I could just run the hammer along those edges and the tape came right off just perfectly.

---------- Post added at 06:36 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:31 PM ----------

When I first got the engine back from Sean, I noticed that he never installed the cam plug in the back of the block. So, I had to order a Sealed Power plug kit for a Ford 302 motor that included brass freeze plugs, new oil galley plugs, and the missing cam plug in question (the biggest one in the middle). Not to worry, the whole kit was less than $10.



When I gave the engine parts to Rich, I also gave him all of those plugs in case he wanted to do anything with them. When I got the engine back from him, not only did he install the screw-in oil galley plugs on the front of the engine, but I also noticed that he installed the cam plug into the back of the block. NICE.



Since Sean installed some cheap-o steel freeze plugs, I decided to replace them with the brass freeze plugs that I had in hand. I put a light coat of gasket sealer all around the plugs, and then hammered them into the block with a large socket.

 

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Who you callin' Pinhead?
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188 Posts
Discussion Starter #129
Put down the final coat of Ford blue this morning (covered the new freeze plugs with the old ones) and let it dry for the day. Once I got home this evening, I ripped all of the masking tape off to finally see how it all turned out. I think the paint turned out pretty well, and I can’t see a hint of overspray anywhere.





Once I finished with the pictures, I coated the cylinder bores and all of the sealing surfaces with WD-40 and sealed the block in some plastic bags. I won’t be doing any building to it for a while. Not until the rest of the engine parts arrive.



---------- Post added at 08:28 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:23 PM ----------

You know that feeling you get when you've got a nice, clean, shiny, freshly-painted car? And then a bird or something takes a FVCKING $HIT ON IT!?!? Any of you with nice and shiny cars know what I'm talking about. Me? I've never had to worry about that since my Mustang's paint looks like an open autopsy (scuffs, scratches, and clear coat peeling everywhere). It's got at least 5 bird shi+s from 5 different birds on it as we speak. But I've never cared.

UNTIL TODAY. Remember how I got the engine bay nice and clean last year? This picture doesn't show it very well, but my nice clean engine bay has gotten a little dusty and dirty over the past year of sitting outside, even with the hood covering it up.



BUT! That dustiness isn't what I'm (comically) pissed about. THIS is what pisses me off. See that? SOMETHING... SOMETHING TOOK A FVCKING $HIT IN MY CLEAN ENGINE BAY!!!

 

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Who you callin' Pinhead?
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188 Posts
Discussion Starter #130
Yay! More engine parts arrived yesterday!

To go along with the newly refurbished crankshaft, I bought a set of new ARP main bolts. The old main bolts were original to the engine, had quite a few miles on them, had been torqued to 70 ft lbs a few times, and were probably pretty stretched out. I was actually surprised to see that this Ford 302 ARP main bolt kit came with a main cap stud (on the far left) for mounting a rear sump oil pickup tube.



For the camshaft, I didn’t need anything fancy. I just needed a cam that was a little bigger than stock that I could live with. I decided to use a Trick Flow Stage 1 cam. It’s got the mild lift and duration numbers that I need for the drivability and performance I’m looking for. It also came with 2 dowel pins. The longer pin is used for a mechanical fuel pump drive, and the shorter pin is used for any engine not running a mechanical-type fuel pump. The cam's got a few fibers, styrofoam pieces, and some kind of anti-rust goo all over it, so I'll need to clean it up before I put it in the motor.



Along with the camshaft, I bought...

A set of stock replacement Ford Racing hydraulic roller lifters.



A Comp Cams double roller timing set. Part number 2120.



A new ARP camshaft bolt.



New roller lifter spider and dog bones.



A new camshaft thrust plate. I had to get some grade 8 bolts for it at the hardware store. ¼”-20 X ¾” for those wondering what size they are.



A one-piece fuel pump drive. Thank God the camshaft came with some new dowel pins. The long dowel pin that came with this was just a smidge too big and wouldn’t fit in the cam.



A new Ford Racing pilot bearing.



I should be able to start assembling the short block soon. I’m pretty sure I’ve got everything I need to do so.

 

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Who you callin' Pinhead?
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188 Posts
Discussion Starter #131
I spent today cleaning up some of the short block parts and prepping them for assembly. I wiped all parts down with lacquer thinner to remove oils, greases, and contaminants, and then wiped everything dry with some paper towels.

The main bearings had some kind of assembly lube all over them (they were put in the motor by Sean a few months back). I cleaned both the bearings themselves and the main bores that they sit in.





I gave the same treatment to the rod bearings.



Thankfully, because this engine came out of a Ford Explorer (which only had automatic transmissions IIRC), there was no old pilot bearing to take out of the crankshaft. I just hammered the new pilot bearing right on in there while I had the crank out.



Cleaned up all of the main and rod journals on the crankshaft.



Same treatment given to the camshaft (also installed the longer dowel pin it came with).



Next post, the short block will be getting put together… Hopefully…
 

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Who you callin' Pinhead?
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188 Posts
Discussion Starter #133 (Edited)
Finally began assembling the engine yesterday, starting with the short block.

I started by cleaning out all of the cylinder bores and lifter bores with WD40-soaked paper towels. I wiped every spot down until I saw no trace of dirt or grime on the paper towel.





Once I finished wiping down the cylinder and lifter bores, I installed the camshaft. I coated the main journals of the cam with assembly lube and then slid it into the block. Then, I bolted on the thrust plate. I just coated the threads of the bolts with Loctite and snugged them down. The cam was pretty difficult to turn because of the thick assembly lube, so I put on the cam sprocket (from the timing set) to turn it more easily. Once I was able to turn the cam, I coated all of the lobes with some 15W-40 Rotella oil.



After the camshaft install, I coated all of the main bearings in assembly lube and set the crankshaft in the motor. Before bolting on all of the main caps though, I took the time to install the one-piece rear main seal. I coated the inner part of the seal with assembly lube, and the outer part with a light film of gasket sealer. I also put some gasket sealer on the bottom of the 5th rear main cap where it meets the block (you can see a little bit of the sealer squishing out). I then snugged down all of the main caps.



Crankshaft installed! The ARP main bolts that I used were torqued in three stages to 70 ft lbs. I also put the main cap stud in the right spot for when the oil pickup tube goes on there. The crank turned over very easily with 0.004” of endplay and less than 0.001” of runout.



Timing chain installed! I’ve heard of a few horror stories of those camshaft thrust plate bolts (behind the cam sprocket) actually hitting the cam sprocket, but luckily, the grade 8 bolts I bought had a small enough head to clear it. I lined the cam and crank sprockets up dot-to-dot, put on that fuel pump driver, and torqued the ARP camshaft bolt to 45 ft lbs with Loctite.



Last major step was to install the pistons and rods.

Put on the piston rings with a cheap little set of ring pliers that worked pretty well. The oil ring gaps went towards the back of the piston, while the compression ring gaps faced towards the front of the piston. Never leave the ring gaps directly in-line with each other. Otherwise, the motor ends up having blowby and will burn a hefty amount of oil.





I used a solid Summit Racing 4.030” ring compressor to put the pistons into the engine. It’s a lot like a funnel. The bottom of the compressor is 4.030” wide (same size as the bores of this motor) while the top is about ½” wider than the bottom.



I pushed the piston and rings into the ring compressor with the skirts of the piston sticking out the bottom, then I coated the rod bearings with assembly lube and the cylinder bore with more of that 15W-40 oil. I then placed the piston into the bore and smacked it in there with the handle of a hammer. Once the piston was all the way down in the bore, I removed the ring compressor and smacked the piston further down until the rod bearing contacted the crankshaft. I then put on the rod cap and tightened the ARP rod bolts in sequence until they both reached 45 ft lbs. Repeated that process 7 more times, and the whole rotating assembly was installed. Rod side clearance measured about 0.020" throughout.









Final step was to install the lifters, and this is the part where things didn’t go together perfectly. I went to put in the first lifter, and it would go into the bore just a little, then it completely stopped, not wanting to go in any further. Why?



Remember how Rich (AKA the awesome, non-asshole machinist) installed the screw-in oil galley plugs on the front of the engine? Well apparently, one of those oil galley plugs is RIGHT NEXT to the lifter bore in the picture above. Now, when somebody runs a tap through that particular oil galley to create the threads for the screw-in plug, it often leaves a few burrs in the lifter bore in the picture above that will hang up a lifter. Sure enough, when I pulled that lifter out, I saw burrs inside the lifter bore in question.



Thank God that I bought a file set a few months ago. I had a small round file that I used to knock off whatever burrs were in that lifter bore. Of course, that filing left a few metal shavings in my clean engine. Instead of blowing those shavings out with compressed air like a dumbass (and blowing said metal shavings EVERYWHERE), I sucked them up with a strong shop-vac. I test-fitted the lifter again, and this time, it went in MUCH easier.

After that little mishap, I soaked all of the lifters in the 15W-40 oil and put them into the engine. Luckily, the rest of the lifters had no problem going in. I set the lifter dog bones (pieces shaped like dog bones which keep the lifters from rotating in the lifter bores) and lifter spider (metal tray with 8 legs that holds those dog bones in place with spring tension) into place. I had a little trouble getting those lifter spider bolts started because of the spring tension, but I eventually got them snugged down with Loctite.



OH MY GOD!!! THE SHORT BLOCK IS ASSEMBLED!!! There are no major scratches or gouges in the cylinder bores, the timing marks are lined up, all of the lifters rise and fall in their bores as they should, and the whole rotating assembly turns over without very much effort. Hell, I think it turns over MORE easily than when Sean built it a few months back. Speaking of which, HEY SEAN!!! ASSHOLE MACHINIST!!! IT DOESN”T TAKE 20 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE TO BE ABLE TO BUILD AN ENGINE, YA DICK!!!





---------- Post added at 08:59 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:52 PM ----------

Another summer of work is coming up for me again. Hopefully, I’ll be able to order the rest of the engine parts during that time and put the whole thing together in August before the next semester of school begins.

I sold those GT40P heads for $200 back in March to some guy with a 1995 Mustang GT convertible. My GOD, that thing was a POS. Hell, my 230,000 mile V6 Mustang with no drivetrain in it is WAAAAY nicer than that car was even with its fancy Lambo doors. The only thing that 1995 GT had going for it was that it ran and drove… Whoops. Sorry. Got off on a bad tangent there.

Joking aside, I don’t have those old GT40P heads anymore, so my biggest expense over the summer will be a set of aluminum heads if money allows. Along with the rest of the (somewhat) expensive parts that have to go along with said aluminum heads. If I can get the engine finished up by the end of this summer, then I’ll move on to building a T5 transmission over this coming winter.

For now though, the engine is all bagged up again until it’s ready for final assembly later this August.

 

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Very nice work man! I knew you could pull it off. Engine looks amazing. This build reminds me of my teen years. I used to work on my dads 82 mustang I remember falling asleep under the freaking car all the time.
 

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Who you callin' Pinhead?
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188 Posts
Discussion Starter #136
Very nice work man! I knew you could pull it off. Engine looks amazing. This build reminds me of my teen years. I used to work on my dads 82 mustang I remember falling asleep under the freaking car all the time.
Thanks good sir.

Sometimes, whenever the weather's nice and I've got absolutely nothing to do, I just pace around my Mustang behind the shop thinking about stuff. School, family issues, friendships, my jobs, plans for this build, who I am, what I'm doing, where I'm going, etc. I'll easily spend an hour or two pacing around that car, just thinking.

woah woah woah dude

You can't just go and assemble a short block yourself, man, **** could have blown up! You're lucky nothing went wrong, that you still have all your fingers, and that you didn't tear a damn hole in the space-time continuum!
 

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8,738 Posts
Very interesting read and build. I knew you could assemble it. I assembled mine at 19.

Using the hypereutectic pistons I'm assuming your staying NA?
 

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Who you callin' Pinhead?
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188 Posts
Discussion Starter #138
Very interesting read and build. I knew you could assemble it. I assembled mine at 19.
Thank you my good man. I'm 20 right now, and am only able to do most of this engine work because of all the research I did before I jumped into this build. The research was also why I knew how to fix that stuck lifter.

Using the hypereutectic pistons I'm assuming your staying NA?
No boost for me. Too expensive. Not only due the cost of a turbo / supercharger itself, but also, the cost of the parts I would have to buy to support / hold up to it. Like the plumbing, intercooler, blow-through setup, stronger engine internals, stronger clutch, stronger transmission parts, etc.

I might throw some boost at my car when I'm finished with college though...
 

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Who you callin' Pinhead?
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188 Posts
Discussion Starter #139
I had a little time today to figure out the deck clearance of my engine. For those that don’t know, deck clearance is the amount of space between the top of the piston and the top of the head gasket surface on the block (AKA the deck). This is important since deck clearance is one of the factors in compression ratio of the engine.

The true way to measure deck clearance is to take the height of the rotating assembly (1/2 of crankshaft stroke + connecting rod length + piston pin height) and subtract that from the deck height of the block (length from the middle of the main bore to the deck). Deck height - Rotating assembly height = Deck clearance.

For my engine, I already know the rotating assembly height. I’m using the stock E7 crankshaft that has a stroke of 3.00”. The Eagle connecting rods have a length of 5.090”. And the Speed Pro pistons have a pin height of 1.605”. So, (3.00 / 2) + 5.090 + 1.605 = 8.195. The height of my rotating assembly is 8.195”.

I also needed to know the block’s deck height for my deck clearance calculation. The problem though, was that I had no idea what the deck height of my block was! I didn’t know if it was ever milled at the machine shop or not!

Luckily though, I had a good solution for the deck height problem by using a magnetic dial indicator. Since I already knew what the rotating assembly height was, I could use that and the dial indicator to figure out exactly what the deck height of my block was.

With the short block assembled, I brought the #1 piston up to top-dead-center (TDC), then placed the dial indicator on the deck of the block. With the dial indicator in place, I set the gauge to zero on the deck.



I then moved the indicator to the middle of the #1 piston at TDC, which moved the needle on the gauge. There was my deck clearance right there. 0.010”.



SO! My engine’s deck clearance is about 0.010”. That makes sense since the piston at TDC sits ever-so-slightly down into the bore. Now all I need to do to figure out the deck height of the block is add that 0.010” deck clearance to the 8.195” rotating assembly height, and that gives my block an 8.205” deck height!

Since the factory deck height of a Ford 302 block is 8.206” and I measured my block’s deck height out to be 8.205” (less than 1% error), THAT MEANS that my block was never milled at the machine shop!

To be sure that the decks of the block were completely flat, I took a straight edge (not just a plain ruler or yard stick, I used a TRUE machined straight edge) and laid it in multiple places on the deck. In each of those places, I attempted to slide a 0.001” feeler gauge under the whole length of the straight edge. That 0.001” blade wouldn’t slide under the straight edge anywhere on either deck of the block, so it doesn’t need to be milled at all! Nice!

Once again, 8.206” deck height - 8.195” rotating assembly height = 0.011” deck clearance. It’s also nice to know that the block has never been milled and doesn’t need to be either.
 
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