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hi,
I have a 2005 mustang v6 and I want both rear tires to spin out, that's all I want it to do am not looking to race it, drift it nothing like that. I been doing a little looking around and am kind of confused, do I have to change my gears to? Or can I just buy a limited slip differential and have it installed? If so which one should I go with?
Thanks
 

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*NOTE: I don't have much knowledge of V6's*

Mustangs have had LSD since the late 80's man, if you're doing 1 wheel peels its because your clutch packs are shot in the diff. Simple replacement!

*Again, if you had a GT that would be the response, but I don't know the 7.5's well, just 8.8's.*
 

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*NOTE: I don't have much knowledge of V6's*

Mustangs have had LSD since the late 80's man, if you're doing 1 wheel peels its because your clutch packs are shot in the diff. Simple replacement!

*Again, if you had a GT that would be the response, but I don't know the 7.5's well, just 8.8's.*
Nope. They're all open differential on the s197 v6s. My old 06 v6 spun one wheel from when it was brand new.


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Nope. They're all open differential on the s197 v6s. My old 06 v6 spun one wheel from when it was brand new.


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Not entirely true. From 05-10 the V6's came with a 7.5" OPEN rear differential. The 2011 V6's all come with 8.8 rear limited slip diffs (same rear ends in our cars IIRC).

The easiest thing I could recommend is go to the local salvage yard and find a GT 8.8 and swap out the 7.5" rear end for the 8.8 rear end. Otherwise, your only bet is the FRPP "Traction-Lok" which from my experience with the ones in our GT's, is they are junk for pretty much anything except burnouts and drag racing. They wear out way too quick for drifting, autocross, or any serious corner carving.
 

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Then what do you recommend for a turning diff?


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Lots of popular options out there:

Torsen T2-R - Great option, not a friend of shock loading (launching at a drag strip)

Torsen T2 - Less torque biasing than the T2-R and still just as fragile, but cheaper

Eaton TrueTrac Helical Gear Diff - Similar to the T2 in performance but noticeably stronger

WaveTrac - Lifetime warranty including racing, high bias ratio for more authority when cornering and a preload mechanism to help when a wheel goes airborne (non preloaded torque biasing diffs like the 3 above go open (one wheel peel) when a wheel goes airborne) or there is no load on the diff such as the transition between acceleration and deceleration. You pay for it though at $995. Not a lot of folks on this diff, but one I plan to go to.

Eaton Posi - This is a clutch diff with better clutch life and performance than the stock Traction-Lok. This, unless something else has changed, is what Sam Strano recommends and I believe ran when he autocrossed his 2011 5.0L in E-Street Prepared. Clutch packs wear out though...

Auburn Pro Racer - Some guys, including Sam on one of his other cars are also running this diff. It's a clutch diff but the clutch packs are conical in shape. My gripe with these diffs is that the differential housing is a wear item, so when the clutch packs go out, you have to replace the whole damn unit. Sam has an exchange program for these but lets face it, it is incredibly annoying to be changing out whole differentials every year or so and have that downtime with the car while waiting for the replacement.

Of those the T2, and Eaton TrueTrac are definitely the most popular units mostly due to price. The T2R offers better performance than either of those two with less durability (and price) than the WaveTrac.

Personally, I'm leaning towards the torque biasing diffs (T2R, T2, TrueTrac, WaveTrac) because of how they operate. Nothing beats torque multiplying for getting a car to turn. I suggest reading into these types of differentials. Clutch type differentials also work but work in a very different way to help the car turn and that method involves clutch packs that do wear out.

I got about 28k miles out of my Traction-Lok and roughly a season and a half of autocross (15 events IIRC) and when the tech replaced the clutch packs (under warranty, it is nice to know the tech) he said the clutch packs where nothing more than a bunch of steel plates because all of the friction material had been worn off the pucks they are attached to. Serious autocrossers get less than a full season out of them (these are the guys that go to an event every weekend or every other weekend, whereas I'm monthly). It doesn't take long for those $100 Ford rebuild kits for the T-Lok to add up to the cost of the more expensive diffs when you run your car hard. Just pay attention to your car and how it feels. If your back end is very unpredictable under power in terms of how it breaks loose then you may need to rebuild the T-Lok or replace it. For me, the big indicator was during an autocross event the engine just free revved for a moment about midway through a turn when I put my foot down. That was my tires turning into expensive smoke until sufficient load returned to stop the wheel spin.
 
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