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Turbo > blower
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Indicated airspeed is the speed of the air going over the wings. You go higher, indicated goes down, because the air is thinner. You can see in the top right that we are doing .80 Mach. True airspeed is 455 + 134 tailwind = 589


The tailwind is slightly quartering so we are only getting 134 of it for a push. The other 6 knots is crosswind.

Indicated is what keeps the plane flying. Say the airplane stalls at 140 knots clean. That's based on IAS (indicated airspeed). As you go higher and higher, the indicated goes down, even though the airplane is moving through the air faster. As the indicated comes down, it moves closer to stall. This airplane has such a great wing that it's never a factor, but the Lear would back itself into what's called the coffin corner. The IAS would come down so low that it may only be 10-15 knots over stall, so you're flying it at its max Mach, so you can't go any faster, but if you slow down 15 knots, you stall. It's a fine line.


True airspeed (TAS) - the airspeed at which an airplane is moving relative to the air that surrounds it. Indicated airspeed corrected for non standard temperature and pressure.

Ground speed (GS) - the speed of the aircraft in relation to the ground.

Indicated airspeed (IAS) - the speed of an aircraft as shown on the airspeed indicator, calibrated to reflect standard atmospheric a diabetic compressible flow at sea level, incorrect end for airspeed system errors.
Ah I gotcha. I didn't know indicated airspeed and actual airspeed were different.
 

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missippi roolz
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9,244 Posts
...

Indicated airspeed (IAS) - the speed of an aircraft as shown on the airspeed indicator, calibrated to reflect standard atmospheric a diabetic compressible flow at sea level, incorrect end for airspeed system errors.
Strange, I never heard of this term when I was in AE. :hidinghere:
 

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Anandavenkatakrishnan
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21,386 Posts
The IAS would come down so low that it may only be 10-15 knots over stall, so you're flying it at its max Mach, so you can't go any faster, but if you slow down 15 knots, you stall. It's a fine line.
What is the service ceiling on this plane? Wouldn't that be the case if you were flying close to the service ceiling?

Even if our ground speed was 900 knots, that doesn't mean we broke the speed of sound.
+1 da speed of sound has many factors. Altitude is a huge one.
 

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Powered by LSx tears
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Discussion Starter #36
What is the service ceiling on this plane? Wouldn't that be the case if you were flying close to the service ceiling?



+1 da speed of sound has many factors. Altitude is a huge one.
The 300 service ceiling is Fl450, but that's only because it likes to fly. It was originally designed to go to FL510, which it does well, but it doesn't slow down very well because it's so clean, so it doesn't meet the emergency decent requirement to get from its service ceiling to 10,000'. You have to be able to make it from cruise altitude to 10,000' in 10 minutes for certification.


And no, being at FL450 this doesn't get you the coffin corner because the wing is so good. The Lear 60 had you there at FL450 and it's service ceiling was FL510, but it's wing sucked. I'd never go over FL430 in it.
 

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missippi roolz
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The 300 service ceiling is Fl450, but that's only because it likes to fly. It was originally designed to go to FL510, which it does well, but it doesn't slow down very well because it's so clean, so it doesn't meet the emergency decent requirement to get from its service ceiling to 10,000'. You have to be able to make it from cruise altitude to 10,000' in 10 minutes for certification.


And no, being at FL450 this doesn't get you the coffin corner because the wing is so good. The Lear 60 had you there at FL450 and it's service ceiling was FL510, but it's wing sucked. I'd never go over FL430 in it.
I've never seen this before: what is "FL"?
 

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Anandavenkatakrishnan
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21,386 Posts
The 300 service ceiling is Fl450, but that's only because it likes to fly. It was originally designed to go to FL510, which it does well, but it doesn't slow down very well because it's so clean, so it doesn't meet the emergency decent requirement to get from its service ceiling to 10,000'. You have to be able to make it from cruise altitude to 10,000' in 10 minutes for certification.


And no, being at FL450 this doesn't get you the coffin corner because the wing is so good. The Lear 60 had you there at FL450 and it's service ceiling was FL510, but it's wing sucked. I'd never go over FL430 in it.

lol oh


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---------- Post added at 09:11 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:10 AM ----------

I've never seen this before: what is "FL"?

flight level.

for example FL360 means 36000 feet above sea level


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