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MM's Ginger
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is forged exactly? i know its stronger than a stock part but exactly how is it different?
 

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Premium Member
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Well. . . you know those movies where the swords break? those are like cheap non forged internals. you heard of excalibur that a forged sword! like termi internals. . . . . i hope this helps
 

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June 2010 ROTM
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lifted from the innenet somewhere...

Forged steel typically refers to the process of making steel objects by forming them into shape with hydraulic machines (as opposed to casting), and then heat treating the product. Typically, forged steel is stronger and less prone to cracking than cast parts.
 

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Billy Weston
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There you go, google is a hell of a thing isn't it :D
 

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MM's Ginger
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
lifted from the innenet somewhere...

Forged steel typically refers to the process of making steel objects by forming them into shape with hydraulic machines (as opposed to casting), and then heat treating the product. Typically, forged steel is stronger and less prone to cracking than cast parts.
i was thinking that and i know that they do something like that for swords n stuff but i didnt know it was possible for more difficult shapes like a piston and a crank
 

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Rollin' 18/ pushin' 2
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It refers to the process of heating the metal and cooling it very quickly. This is done repeatedly and has the effect of making the steel more dense on a molecular level. Thus making it much stronger than metal that is just poured into a cast, allowed to cool then removed and finished.
 

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Registered
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Your talking about tempering ^^^

The way it works is you have a cast shape like a rough form of your crank for instance. Then, the shape is either slightly heated or not heated at all and worked into the final shape. Any heating that is done is simply to aid in the shapping, but not enough to totally break the bonds of the steal like you would when you melt it. Then the final piece is tempered through a specialized heating and cooling process. The result is a much stronger metal that is actually more flexible yet stronger. Cast pieces are often either too hard and brittle, or too soft and bend.
 

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FucusRuckus
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yea, they heat it and instead of putting it in a cast to form it the press it into shape, which makes it more resistant to cracks and withstands higher hp ratings because of that...basically what they said up there
 

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MM's Ginger
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
ahhh thank ya
 
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