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6 Cylinduh, Really Bruh?
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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm replacing the front wheel bearing and hub assemblies on my car. I ordered them off AM because I had store credit from an alternator that lasted all of 30 miles on my car. I get them in and they are mevotech made in China. Wtf! 50$ per bearing. They sell for $22 bucks off the economy section on rockauto. I could have got timkens or Moog for cheaper.

Anyway is mevotech even a good brand? Last thing I want to do is install cheap crap. I'm thinking of returning them and going timkens as I don't know how well Moog is on their bearings but at least I know their suspension stuff is top notch. At least the timkens and Moog are stamped USA.

Thoughts? I've learned that Chinese made items aren't the best but I don't know if mevotech is any better?

AM has been killing me lately with subpar parts.
 

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I got moog bearing and hub assemblies for 65 each at Autozone, which is a little expensive but I like buying parts in person, and I trust moog. I just took off the front spindle/steering knuckle and brought them to a friend with a good impact to swap them over. I would replace the lock nut too, they're supposed to be TTY.
 

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Put them on and be done. They will be fine. Most parts like these are all made in the same place - besides MOOG maybe. I wouldn't worry too much about it.
 

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6 Cylinduh, Really Bruh?
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys. Im just OCD about my car. Moog, timken, and motorcraft are all stamped USA. Motorcraft looks identical to timken.

I got a new nut. I got timken bearing grease. I read just take off the old assembly, clean and lube the spindle then put the new assembly on. A video I saw didn't use grease but antisieze. What's the correct procedure?

Oh and tighten the nut to 250 ft lbs with a 36mm 1/2in socket. Put dust cap back on with rubber mallet. Nut I got is from Dorman. It's a copper color
 

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I greased the spindle with some anti-seize, but the old ones came right off without an issue and they were original with 130k+ miles. I guess it depends how prevalent rust is where you live. Here in the NW it's minimal. You shouldn't have to grease the bearing itself unless the instructions specifically tell you too. I bought MOOG hubs and they were almost sealed so I wouldn't have been able to grease them if I tried.

It's really straight forward. Remove the old hub, put on the new one. Tighten a NEW 36mm nut to 250 ft lbs. Done.
 

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I greased the spindle with some anti-seize, but the old ones came right off without an issue and they were original with 130k+ miles.
That must be the life of the bearing. I had a local shop change my front hubs. Both front bearings went out at 130,000 and 135,000 miles.
 

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My front hubs could have been placed before me but I don't think they were. I haven't replaced them. I bought the car with 135k miles and I'm now at 190k+ on them...I hope they were replaced. Everytime I go to replace them something else comes up (like superchargers) and I neglect them...
 

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6 Cylinduh, Really Bruh?
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Discussion Starter #8
I greased the spindle with some anti-seize, but the old ones came right off without an issue and they were original with 130k+ miles.
That must be the life of the bearing. I had a local shop change my front hubs. Both front bearings went out at 130,000 and 135,000 miles.
Why did the originals die after 5k? Cheap parts?
 

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The driver's side went out at 130,000 miles. The passenger side at 135,000. The car has 206,000 miles on it now and the two replacement hubs are holding up fine.
 

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6 Cylinduh, Really Bruh?
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Discussion Starter #10
The driver's side went out at 130,000 miles. The passenger side at 135,000. The car has 206,000 miles on it now and the two replacement hubs are holding up fine.
Ahhh okay that makes sense.

Those type of miles with a blower gives me hope. Over the years I've replaced almost every wearable item on the car. Since I've had it I've put about 25k miles on it. If it lasts to 200k plus I'll have the car til I die or we no longer use fossil fuels.

Any engine work done to your car besides the typical oil change and such? Only bigger repair I needed was timing chain guides. Just curious what awaits me in the future.
 

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Nothing on the inside of the motor has been changed or repaired.

I'm a big advocate of full-synthetic oil. Years ago I wrote a couple of reports why. I did a lot of research and posted links to everything so that people could do their own research. For a couple of years I also recommended adding a half quart of ZDDP to modern oils. I used Resoline ZDDP additive. Even though I still use higher levels of ZDDP I no longer recommend that because of some tests that have been done since and I am uncertain if it is really needed.
http://www.moddedmustangs.com/forums/96-04/292127-grade-oil-should-you-use-2.html

When I bought the car it had 65,000 miles. The owners manual says to run 5 quarts of conventional 5w30 but I have been running full-synthetic oil from day one. I ran five quarts of 5w30 full-synthetic Quaker State for the longest time then switched to 6 quarts even though it looked like I was overfilling the crank case on the dipstick (I wasn't.). Romeos use 6 quarts. I later changed to full-synthetic Mobile 1 0w30 because of the additional cold start protection. When the oil companies lowered the ZDDP content from 800 ppm to 650 ppm I started adding a half quart of ZDDP additive.

I then did the 6-quart dipstick mod and now put in 6.5 quarts to get to the full mark. Because I have a high mileage motor with larger bearing clearances due to wear I switched to full-synthetic 0w40 European Blend. Why European blend? Because it has the level of ZDDP that was recommended when our engines were manufactured which is 1000 ppm. (I'm an old dog. Even though tests are showing that the new anti-wear additives work I still want the previously recommended level of ZDDP. I just can't shake the idea that its needed. If they worked so well why do European manufacturers require 1000 ppm ZDDP?)
http://www.moddedmustangs.com/forums/96-04/542817-new-6-qt-dipstick.html

The only part of my motor that has ever been opened up is the timing chain cover. I lost a spacer on the supercharger bracket and went through a period of shredding belts. One of them cracked the timing chain cover and I ended up with an oil leak. People on the forum had been talking about how quickly the timing chain guides wore out. Most were saying to change them around 90,000-100,000 miles. Since I had 150,000 miles on the motor I told my tuner (also an engine builder) to change out everything that needed replaced when the cover was off. Nothing needed replaced. He said he couldn't believe how little wear there was on the timing chain guides. At 206,000 miles I still haven't changed them.

I noticed in your post that you have changed your timing change guides. What was the mileage? How badly had they worn?

When I was driving 20,000 miles per year I changed oil every 5,000 miles. I changed my supercharger oil at the same time. Why 5000 miles? xxx5000 and xxx0000 is very easy to see on the odometer. Oil change stations say to change oil every 3000 miles but that isn't necessary. The rule in older owners manuals was to change oil every 3,000 miles city, 8,000 highway.

Since I retired I drive around 6,000 per year so I change crankcase oil in the Spring and in the Fall and I change supercharger oil in the Spring. Cold weather causes oil additives to deteriorate faster. That is why we are not suppose to store oil in the cold. If you drive so few miles that you only change oil once per year (like my wife's Corvette) it is important to change oil in the Spring.

I do not recommend 5w20 conventional or full-synthetic oil unless you drive like grandma. It was only recommend by Ford to avoid government fleet gas mileage fines and it is too thin for anyone who drives aggressively.
 

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6 Cylinduh, Really Bruh?
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Discussion Starter #12
I'm at 95k miles. The guides were so badly worn it chewed thru the plastic and started to eat away at the metal. It was caught when my K was dropped to do the long tubes. The oil pan gasket was leaking so it was changed. When the pan was dropped there was flakes of metal in there. Blah

Very informative post! I run 5w30 Mobil 1 high mileage full synthetic. I also dump in a bottle of at205 reseal. At around 80k miles my car was throwing smoke after idling.... valve stem seals. I didn't want to pay to get them changed but I remember fixing my harbor freight jack with the at205 stuff. The cylinder started leaking fluid. On YouTube I remember seeing Scotty Kilmer fix his jack using the stuff. To this day it's still fixed. And to this day I have no more smoke after idling.

I drive 1k miles a year on the car. It's mostly a garage queen and hobby. I took it out for work last Friday which is the first time in almost a month I drove it more then 2 miles. It used to be a DD but about 7 or 8 years ago I got a company car so it sits now. Paid off and 74 bucks a month in insurance.

I too bought it with 65k miles. Got it dirt cheap. Love the hell out of it. Want to get a new S550 but can't see paying a payment on a car that sits. Ess if it runs fine. Just slow but that's 2vs
 

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6 Cylinduh, Really Bruh?
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Discussion Starter #14
Slow is a relative term. From the factory it was faster than a 1967 Shelby Cobra GT-500 (14.3 quarter). And it was almost as fast as a 1968 Shelby Cobra GT-500KR (13.7 quarter). Stock a1999 Ford Mustang GT will run a13.9 quarter. Put on a centrifugal supercharger and it runs mid-12s.
https://www.zeroto60times.com/vehicle-make/shelby-0-60-mph-times/
https://www.zeroto60times.com/vehicle-make/ford-0-60-mph-times/
Lol very true sir. I guess I'm comparing it to all the cars I see on the road today. It never fails when I take it out i get someone challenging me. Revving at me. Yelling to race. ECT. Sometimes I bite and sometimes I just want to cruise. Regardless some of these newer cars I simply can't run with. Others I am shocked I won.

Case in point the new RT challenger from Sunday. Went from a rolling 50 on the bridge to 110 then I let off. Barely got him. Those things are big heavy and slow. Then the other day I get smoked by some jetta thing off the line. This all happened in Mexico.

I'm just saying I drive a lot of newer cars and mine is slow considering all the mods done
 

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We are in the second muscle car era. The first was early 1960-1972. Few muscle cars survived that. The 70s and 80s were devoid of muscle cars. If you can believe it Ford took a Pinto platform and put a Mustang body on it and called it a Mustang II. You do not want to know my opinion of that car. They then followed that with the Escort Mustang. It even had a hatch back. I know some love the Fox bodies. It is what they grew up with but to me they are not Mustangs.

The second muscle car era started in the late 1990s and accelerated. The 96 Mustang started to have the look and the power. Then came the '99 and the world was set right. Muscle cars were back. There are many cars on the road today that insurance companies in the first muscle car era wouldn't insure.

There are always faster cars. Back in the day I drove a 1966 Dodge that would kick a Cobra's ass (they really weren't all that fast). With my Mustang I wanted a car as fast as that old Dodge. I'm pretty sure my car with the supercharger comes close even though it only has 281 ci instead of 426 or 440. I still can't believe that little bitty motor does so well.

There are always faster cars. The oil embargo and insurance companies killed the first muscle car era. Who knows what will stop this one. Enjoy it while it lasts.
 

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2Vs are slow but can be made relevant with boost.
 

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6 Cylinduh, Really Bruh?
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Discussion Starter #17
We are in the second muscle car era. The first was early 1960-1972. Few muscle cars survived that. The 70s and 80s were devoid of muscle cars. If you can believe it Ford took a Pinto platform and put a Mustang body on it and called it a Mustang II. You do not want to know my opinion of that car. They then followed that with the Escort Mustang. It even had a hatch back. I know some love the Fox bodies. It is what they grew up with but to me they are not Mustangs.

The second muscle car era started in the late 1990s and accelerated. The 96 Mustang started to have the look and the power. Then came the '99 and the world was set right. Muscle cars were back. There are many cars on the road today that insurance companies in the first muscle car era wouldn't insure.

There are always faster cars. Back in the day I drove a 1966 Dodge that would kick a Cobra's ass (they really weren't all that fast). With my Mustang I wanted a car as fast as that old Dodge. I'm pretty sure my car with the supercharger comes close even though it only has 281 ci instead of 426 or 440. I still can't believe that little bitty motor does so well.

There are always faster cars. The oil embargo and insurance companies killed the first muscle car era. Who knows what will stop this one. Enjoy it while it lasts.
Seems like rising gas prices and the expansion of alternative energies and fuels may kill this one. Can't say it's a bad thing. To be honest I'm all for alternatives to fossil fuels.

As I read up on the latest advancements in electric cars I'm shocked and in aw just how inefficient and almost prehistoric internal combustion engines are. That's a whole new topic.

Now we have the coyote. I've read up on advancements coming thru the pipe line on that motor and shocked. Don't get me started on GM.

Regardless it's all about the fun and what you enjoy. I honestly couldn't afford to keep upgrading to keep up with the war, and honestly I get too emotionally attached. That would be nuts to keep buying a new car every 3 to 4 years to modify then change again.

When this motor ever fails I'll probably swap it to whatever is available at the time I can afford. For now I rock the 2v and enjoy.
 

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6 Cylinduh, Really Bruh?
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Discussion Starter #18
2Vs are slow but can be made relevant with boost.
Agreed but even then you're basically neck and neck with 2011 technology (aka the coyote) which is now 7 years old. Crazy to think my car is 18 years old now. I still get just as giddy to drive it as I did on day 1. Probably more so now due to all the blood sweat and tears invested.
 
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