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whats the best suspension setup we can go with as far as weight transfer and everything else?? it already has lowering springs on it and also upper and lower control arms, so other than that
 

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Eibach Drag springs or coil overs will give u better setup. Lowering springs kill weight transfer
 

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Baker Jr.
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^+1. Ever wonder why your car sat high in the front stock compared to the back..Weight transfer, Ill take the look over transfer though, Im running my drag radials all the time now
 

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drag spring's, strange 10 way adj. shock's/struts, baseline upper's & steeda aluminum lower's, sfc's, welded torque boxes. you'll pretty much be set, guy's are gettin sub 1.5 '60's up here on that set up.
 

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There really is no BEST drag set up for any particular car. It depends on your goald and weather it is a daily, weekend warrior, or straight up drag car.

How much are you looking to spend?

Can you deal with some added noise?

Is it your DD?

drag spring's, strange 10 way adj. shock's/struts, baseline upper's & steeda aluminum lower's, sfc's, welded torque boxes. you'll pretty much be set, guy's are gettin sub 1.5 '60's up here on that set up.

^^^^^^^^
That is a pretty basic set up that will get the job done!

Along with that set up, make sure to remove the front sway bar, or those parts really wont work to their full potential. A weld in rear anti roll bar will help keep the car launching straight and stop the axle from twisting under the car. I added a Baseline Suspension weld in ARB in my 96, and instead of trying to lift the left front of the car, it comes up nice and even now.


Also if you wanted to lose some weight along the way, add a tubular K member w/ a arms. Get a quality drag piece like an AJE or PA. I have a QU1, but I do not like how much it changes the front suspension geometry.
 

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I wish i could set mine up to drag better but i just WILL NOT sacrifice looks for a 11 or 12 second stroll. Rather parkin lot pimp the **** out of my lowered stang! ;)
 

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yea im no expert but im sure once you start looking for the "best" 1/4 susp. you gotta get the adj parts so you can adjust everything that works for "your" car. but thats means you gotta get under there and udjust stuff over and over and over to tweak it to perfection. and then that means you gotta make runs after runs after runs to see what helps and doesnt. SOOOOOO.....you should just look at the susp threads and go from there and im sure you'll be able to find some basic yet detailed stuff.
 

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I wish i could set mine up to drag better but i just WILL NOT sacrifice looks for a 11 or 12 second stroll. Rather parkin lot pimp the **** out of my lowered stang! ;)


yea even though i might suspect that Bakers a little :gay i agree with him +1, parking lot pimpin...all the way.












ok ok ok there goes my jelousy speakin out again :sorry j/k ;)
 

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Would coil overs be better than drag springs since they are adjustable? And can you set them to lower your car for regular driving and then raise them to whatever you want when you want to drag?
 

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Would coil overs be better than drag springs since they are adjustable? And can you set them to lower your car for regular driving and then raise them to whatever you want when you want to drag?
Coil overs are the ideal set up for drag racing. thats why most drag cars have coil overs instead of coil springs.
 
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Procrastinator
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coil over setup is better, just do a full tubular front, get adjustable rear setup, remove front sway bar and make sure you have good tires.
 

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Would coil overs be better than drag springs since they are adjustable? And can you set them to lower your car for regular driving and then raise them to whatever you want when you want to drag?
Coil overs are the ideal set up for drag racing. thats why most drag cars have coil overs instead of coil springs.
Thanks F8L. What about the question I highlighted though? Can you have a drag setup but then lower the coilovers so you still have the lowered look for regular driving (or if you're supergay like Baker, parkin lot pimpin:pimp)?
 

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I like the low look to but it would be nice if it would hook up lol I thought about pickin up a set of MM adjustable LCA's with the jack bolt under the spring...put the stock springs back in the back and turn em down for the street and turn em back up for the track...what do you guys think?
 

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Thanks F8L. What about the question I highlighted though? Can you have a drag setup but then lower the coilovers so you still have the lowered look for regular driving (or if you're supergay like Baker, parkin lot pimpin:pimp)?
yes you cam set them some what to an extent, for however far the trave is on the shock/strut. if you go too much all you will be doing is compressing that spring a lot. but then if you keep changing you might not find that spot that worked best at the track the time before. The best way to use it is to set it up to where they work best and just leave them there
 

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yes you cam set them some what to an extent, for however far the trave is on the shock/strut. if you go too much all you will be doing is compressing that spring a lot. but then if you keep changing you might not find that spot that worked best at the track the time before. The best way to use it is to set it up to where they work best and just leave them there
Urm, sort of. When you adjust a coilover, you're not changing how compressed the spring is, you're changing where the lower end of the spring rides relative to the strut. This changes the strut's effective length (by changing where the piston will be in its extension), but the only effect on spring compression will be from the shift in weight distribution (lowering the ride height shifts more resting weight to that corner, which will increase static compression).

In terms of adjusting your coilovers between settings for street and track, just remember that any adjustment you make will affect your alignment settings. On a MacPherson strut, you will gain positive camber and caster as you lower the car as well as changing your toe settings (I believe you will increase toe out, but I'm not 100% on that). If you're not the type to do a home alignment, I would have it set up best for the track and leave it alone. My suggestion would be to learn how to do the alignment at home, though this would require purchasing caster/camber plates, and there seems to be opposition to that from most of the MM crowd.
 

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Urm, sort of. When you adjust a coilover, you're not changing how compressed the spring is, you're changing where the lower end of the spring rides relative to the strut. This changes the strut's effective length (by changing where the piston will be in its extension), but the only effect on spring compression will be from the shift in weight distribution (lowering the ride height shifts more resting weight to that corner, which will increase static compression).

In terms of adjusting your coilovers between settings for street and track, just remember that any adjustment you make will affect your alignment settings. On a MacPherson strut, you will gain positive camber and caster as you lower the car as well as changing your toe settings (I believe you will increase toe out, but I'm not 100% on that). If you're not the type to do a home alignment, I would have it set up best for the track and leave it alone. My suggestion would be to learn how to do the alignment at home, though this would require purchasing caster/camber plates, and there seems to be opposition to that from most of the MM crowd.
Yes your right Rev, i dont know what i was thinking
 

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Urm, sort of. When you adjust a coilover, you're not changing how compressed the spring is, you're changing where the lower end of the spring rides relative to the strut. This changes the strut's effective length (by changing where the piston will be in its extension), but the only effect on spring compression will be from the shift in weight distribution (lowering the ride height shifts more resting weight to that corner, which will increase static compression).

In terms of adjusting your coilovers between settings for street and track, just remember that any adjustment you make will affect your alignment settings. On a MacPherson strut, you will gain positive camber and caster as you lower the car as well as changing your toe settings (I believe you will increase toe out, but I'm not 100% on that). If you're not the type to do a home alignment, I would have it set up best for the track and leave it alone. My suggestion would be to learn how to do the alignment at home, though this would require purchasing caster/camber plates, and there seems to be opposition to that from most of the MM crowd.
So if you slammed the coilover to be as low as it could go, would you risk bottoming out the strut?

This is on the rear though, I didn't think there was camber/caster/toe with the rear suspension. I'd def. get MMR CC plates for the front.
 
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