Modded Mustang Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Did some research and couldn't really find anything on here but I have a Black mustang and I guess the rocks were hitting the front of my car. It left some little white dots but no dents. It isn't like very noticable unless you are looking for them but now that I have seen them I can't help but look at them so any advice of products to get rid of these?
 

·
IBEATU
Joined
·
5,919 Posts
Best cheap fix is to use touch up paint. It's not a perfect fix but it will look ten times better. I found some paint in a pen from Dupli-Color, it is BZ(Chrome Yellow) for my 98. It worked really well actually
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Did you have to sand it or anything? I used the paint from dealer on old bumber and it looked like **** but I think I put too much on there
 

·
IBEATU
Joined
·
5,919 Posts
I didnt man, its not perfect. Its a temporary fix though, because I plan on painting it within the year. It will hide it more than anything, the surface won't be perfectly smooth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
I unfortunately have the same issue with some minor rock damage from getting caught in a sand storm and it looks like touch up paints are the way to go... at least for a temporary fix. It will sure be nice to get back east where these problems aren't a constant issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Best advice. Go to a few paint shops and try to get one of the touch up guys to do it for you on the side. I found a guy who will paint entire panels for $75 a pop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
I second the idea on the Duplicolor pen. Works much better than regular touchup with a small brush. I also agree with getting someone who does it for a living to do it, but first check their work, you might be able to do just as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
i don't know too much about it but it may help to smooth it out if you hit it with wax and buff very very lightly while it's still soft-ish like a couple hours after putting it on?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
i don't know too much about it but it may help to smooth it out if you hit it with wax and buff very very lightly while it's still soft-ish like a couple hours after putting it on?
I'd be afraid you would rip it right off again. Not only that but you wouldnt be able to get all the white(wax) out around the edges of the chip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Don't polish or wax right away!!! Let it cure first. Something I found that works better than those crappy little brushes is a paper match (for lighting fires). you have better control and it doesn't have clumps of crap on them.
 

·
IBEATU
Joined
·
5,919 Posts
Don't polish or wax right away!!! Let it cure first. Something I found that works better than those crappy little brushes is a paper match (for lighting fires). you have better control and it doesn't have clumps of crap on them.
Thats why the pen works so well!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
When you touch up a place, don't use the brush in the bottle, it puts too much paint on. Tear a match out of a book of matches and use the end that was torn out. On a deep chip take your time and fill it in several times if need be, giving it time to dry between adding more paint. It's not going to be as good as a bodyshop doing it, but it does a lot better than the brush in the touchup paint. Good luck and take your time.
 

·
Your Mom's Favorite
Joined
·
2,452 Posts
I've had a lot of luck putting the paint on with a brush and wiping over the spot with my thumb to remove excess paint, if you do it right the hole will be filled up perfectly with no mess around it. when the paint starts to get tacky, wipe around the hole with a soft cloth to get rid of any residue left by your thumb. Except for the quarter sized hole that a carwash put right at the tip of the front of the hood for me (just needs a little rubbing compound and a few more coats to even that mess out), it's worked great.
 

·
MM's resident Juice head
Joined
·
7,913 Posts
Because the sword would totally botch that application. :rolleyes:


Grabber - how did a car wash do that to your paint?!
probably from either the high pressure water jets or the high pressure dryers that are in those things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,465 Posts
probably from either the high pressure water jets or the high pressure dryers that are in those things.
Egads... maybe I'll stop using the things now.... I thought touchless was safe, but I guess self wash is safest?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Alright so I found this on another website it seems pretty involved but the guy says it works.

Black is a good news/bad news color, bad news is that chips are easily seen, good news is that black is easy to touch-up, just takes patience and some materials. It's not hard, just a little 'involved'.

If you cannot feel the scratch with your fingernail then you only need to buff it out, use 3M Perfect-It polish compound (for black paint) and a very good microfiber towell and rub, baby, rub; it'll take a few minutes but you'll get the scratch out. If it is a deep clear-coat scratch you can rub 2-3 circular strokes with 3M liquid rubbing compound (NO MORE!) to knock-down the edge of the scratch, then finish out with Perfect-It polishing compound.

If it is a rock chip etc then -
* get a sheet of 3000-grit 3M imperial wet/dry (Napa $1, 2500-grit will do in a pinch), vial of touch-up paint (dealer $6), 3M liquid rubbing compound, 3M Perfect-It polish for black paint (Napa $16, large bottle), a 3M fiberglass spot-sanding pen (Walmart, few bucks), and a 500W halogen work lamp so you can really see what you are doing. Optional is a bottle of touch-up clear coat.
* use the fiberglass spot-sanding pen to gently knock-down the edge of the paint, you don't want to make the spot bigger than it already is but you do want to lessen that abrupt edge between the remaining paint and the spot; ideally you do not want to be able to feel the edge of the spot with your fingernail - go easy, not much sanding is required and of course don't make the repair spot any larger than necessary. If you are very careful you will only make the spot another 1/64" larger after knocking down the edge of the chiped area.
* clean spot and apply touch-up paint; remember that the more you dab on there, the more of it you'll need to sand off later. Also remember that the body panel cannot be too hot or too cold, put your hand on the panel, it should be very comfortable to the touch ('neutral' feeling temperature). I would not use the brush included in the bottle, it's too big - try an art brush, or some guys use the end of a toothpick. Ideally you want to just fill the spot with paint (flush) but I find it a little better to be 'proud' than 'shallow'. Let the paint dry completely, like 24-hrs. If your touch-up paint is a little on the goopy side then add a couple drops of enamel thinner.
* tear off the smallest piece of 3000-grit paper you can manipulate with your fingers, saturate the paper in solution of light soapy water and also wet the touch-up spot and begin to lightly sand the blemish down. Do not make a sanding spot any larger than you have to, I inevitably make a 1/2" - 3/4" sanding spot although I try to be more careful. During sanding keep both the paper and surface liberally wet, and use light pressure, let time work for you rather than brute force. You will definitely see a 'ring' showing the edge of the touch-up dab, and as you work the spot down you will hit a magic moment when in just 1-2 sanding strokes the dab suddenly 'disappears' into the parent finish (no visible 'ring' anymore) - STOP SANDING HERE!
* clean the repair area; at this point you should have about a 3/4-inch 'chalky spot', to the beginner this will look alarming but have faith, it's going to come out ok... ideally with a wet finger you should not be able to feel the spot anymore (repair is level with original surface) but this is hand grenades, 'close' is good enough! If the spot is a tad 'shallow' you can apply a dab of touch-up clear coat, let dry, and sand flush with the 3000-grit but be very conservative with sanding so that you don't proceed too far. I do not usually apply a clear coat touch-up, I feel it's optional and besides you've already sanded down the surrounding clear coat already...
* take a very clean microfiber towel and use a quarter-sized dab of 3M liquid rubbing compound to work down the sanding scratches. You have to be VERY CAREFUL with this product, it's aggressive, just as much as the sand paper itself and if you go to far you will put a hole in your clear coat (yes, I've done it). What I do is use firm pressure and rub 4-7 random strokes to change the spot from 'chalky' to 'hazy'; specifically, 3M rubbing compound reduces 3000-grit scratches to 5000-grit scratches...
* clean the area again, and finish with liberal rubbing using the 3M Perfect-It polishing compound and a microfiber cloth, it's gentle enough that it's almost impossible to rub through your paint (you'd have to work at it like 30-minutes!). This last step will take a little while but will deliver a better than new shine, and all evidence of the repair will be gone.

Other tips - First timer's try this on an inconspicuous area (lower bumper, not the hood!) or another vehicle to get the hang of it. Also a word on metal flake finishes, I have not had such good luck with the touchup because when I dab on the paint all the metal flake runs to the bottom of the puddle, the top part of the touch-up is 'paint' and the bottom part is a lump of metallic - just be aware of gravity's affect on metal flake when you dab the touch-up paint.

If the rock strike is bad enough that it actually dents the panel then the best you can hope for is to repair the paint, but even after touching-up you will still see evidence of the damage in the altered reflection of the panel. DO repair the spot anyway, so that the rest of the paint around the chiped area does not get infected by air/polution, fail over time, and the surrounding paint begin to flake away.

Over-the-counter products don't work - i.e. Maguire's scratch-x doesn't work so save your money there. 3M abrasives & polishes WORK GREAT, and I find them economical.

If you have over 50 spots to do, then do yourself a favor and just have the panel repainted!

Also, how you drive makes a big difference. If you tailgate big trucks then you will have massive stone-chip damage on your vehicle, these trailers are heavy enough that they are breaking down the asphault and throwing it at your vehicle. And if you regularly drive triple-digit speeds (guilty) then bug strikes and airborne dirt/sand will really wreak havoc on your paint when the same foreign debris would not at slower speeds. I have just accepted the fact that I will be repainting my front clip regularly every 3-4 years... in the meantime I touch it up and nobody can tell the difference, even at the car shows.

Next time I touch-up my truck I'll take some pics and contribute a how-to.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top