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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there one? I looked through the stickies and did a search, didn't find one if there is.

Basically I'm just looking to see what the junkyard parts list is to do the 5-lug swap on the cheap.

I thinking it involves two Ranger/Aerostar/Exploder right? side axles for the rear, though I'm not sure what all needs to be grabbed beyond that for brakes (just the drum?) For the front, do the A-arms interchange between fox and SN95? Can I just grab the whole A-arm/Spindle/brake assembly? I know the A-arms are longer on SN95s, and that's just fine with me (wider stance and more negative camber? yes please!).

The other thing I'm concerned about are how the brakes interchange. I know most of y'all are drag racers, so brakes aren't as important, but I'll be autocrossing the car and working the front brakes pretty hard. Counterinutitively, I would actually prefer to keep my stock calipers, as this would keep the stock brake balance (larger SN95 brakes would shift braking power rearward, which I do NOT want) and the pads I already have.

I've heard something about needing to stick to '94/95 parts for the front swap, I'm assuming this has to do with the threading on the brake lines.

What about V6 parts? The A-arms should be the same, what about the calipers/rotors?

My apologies if this has been hashed over many times, I just couldn't seem to find it here (yes, I know, I should google it. I trust what I find here more.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Okay, found this thread: http://www.moddedmustangs.com/forums/5-0-mustangs/58274-5-lug-conversion.html

I's confused though, as in that this is said:
You will need 83-92 4 cylinder Ranger rotors in the front and 83-92 4 cylinder/3.0 V6 Ranger driver side axles and drums or 86-97 Aerostar passenger side axles and drums. You could convert the front suspension to 87-93 style also and then use 85-91 Lincoln Mark VII front rotors. The rear is the same whether it is a 7.5 or an 8.8, they use the same axles.
I thought the lugs weren't part of the rotor, and would require that the hub behind it be changed, which requires changing out the spindle.
 

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I have a complete set of 5-lug rear drum brakes with E-brake cable, new small parts, shoes, drums, new brake cylinders. These came off my fox, upgraded to rear disc setup.

anyone want them make me an offer
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What do you have to do to run a 17x9 front and 17x10.5 rear on a 5 lug fox without having rub issues?
A lot is going to depend on backspacing, but in general for the rear you'll just need to stick with the fox-width axle and remove the quad shocks. You could probably fit 10.5s on an SN95 width axle, but I'm guessing you'd have to modify the fender for clearance.

For the front, I'll be running 17x9s. I'm going to swap A-arms for SN95 units, and run '94-'95 Spindles. This will push the whole hub out something like 1.5", which will most likely necessitate some fender modification. For the SN95 A-arm swap you have to change your tie-rod end setup, near as I've found it's stock fox outers with Taurus inners. I'm not done checking stuff out though, and couldn't tell you what year Taurus inners, hahaha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
What size wheel are you going to run in the rear Rev? I'll be paying close attention to this thread as I want to do the 5 lug and autocross

Edit: I don't know if you've seen this stuff or not, but let me know what you think:

North Racecars Brake Solutions
I'm going to be running 17x9s on all 4 corners with the 255/40 RA1s I ran last season (gonna flip them left to right and wear down the other shoulder, lol).

That link is cool stuff, but believe it or not, I'm not looking to do a rear disc conversion. There's a lot of reasons to go to discs, but for my budget I'm not convinced it's worth it. I can do the rear 5-lug swap for pretty cheap if I stay drum, going disc adds at least a couple hundred dollars plus replacing my master cylinder. For right now, I need that money to finish my torque arm conversion and to buy the 5-lug parts in the first place :D
 

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ok i looked up 90 lincoln Mark VII and they have 278mm diameter rotors. which comes out to 10.98 inches. is that the correct rotor?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
88 - honestly not sure.

Okay, so I've started this, I figured I'd doc what I've done so far.

First, after talking to the guys at corner-carvers, I changed my parts list just a hair. I ended up getting the following:

FRONT---------------------
From the junkyard:
1 set of spindle assemblies from a '94 Mustang. I believe these are off a sixxer, shouldn't matter though as near as I can tell, sixxers and GTs shared brakes.

Had the rotors turned, and I'll be picking up some new pads today. Usually I never advocate parts house pads, but this is just to put this together.


REAR--------------------------
From LRS:
This kit: 79-93 Mustang 5 Lug Rear 28 Spline Axle & Drum Kit at LRS - Same Day Shipping!
2 of these guys: 79-04 Mustang Rear Axle Bearing And Seal at LRS - Same Day Shipping!
And one a gasket: 86-10 Mustang 8.8" Rear Differential Cover Gasket at LRS - Same Day Shipping!

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I apologize, there are NO PICS. I don't have a camera besides my cell-phone, and I'm not taking pictures with it when I've got greasy hands. And I'm too lazy to scrub my hands every step to take pictures.

Tackled the rear first. I do suggest having a buddy help you. You don't NEED a hand, and could certainly do this alone, but having an extra set of hands will keep you from having to crawl out from under the car and diving back in a bunch of times.

Started by chocking a front tire, jacking up the rear end by the diff, and setting it down on two jackstands. Removed jack.

Pulled the wheels. Lugnuts are 13/16". Tried to pull the drums. Released e-brake, pulled drums.

Slid my drain pan under the diff. Pulled the diff cover (1/2"), leaving the two upper side bolts in place. Slid a putty knife in to crack the seal, and let the old nasty 90-weight out. When it was mostly drained, pulled the remaining bolts, and removed diff cover. I was lazy, and didn't pull my rear sway bar, so this involved a little monkeying around. If your swaybar isn't held on by nylocks, I'd suggest pulling it first, as it'll make access that much easier.

B-12 chemtool'd the crap out of the diff, so I could see what I was looking at.

When looking at the diff, you'll see open sides and "closed" sides. Open sides are the ones where you can see the spider gears.

Had buddy turn the axle so the diff had a closed side facing out. The difference between the two closed sides is that one has a 5/16" head (maybe 1/4", maybe metric, 5/16" worked for me) bolt that sticks out. The bolt is parallel to the axles, and holds the axle-pin in. Pull this bolt. Mine had been lock-tite'd previously, and took more torque than I was expecting.

With that bolt out, the pin will slide freely. Rotate the diff so that the pin is sloping downward towards the back of the car, then push it in (up) about 1/2" or so in. Rotate the diff backwards (exposed part of pin will come over the top), then pull the pin. Don't go the other way, or that pin will hit the pinion gear.

With the pin removed, had my Buddy rotate the diff so an open side was facing out, and push one axle in. This exposes the C-clip, which in my case just fell the f--- out. With the C-clip removed, we slid the axle out.

Axle bearings/seals were a while-I-was-in-there. These took the majority of the time we had wrapped up in the swap.

I popped the old seal out with a claw hammer. I don't recommend this, but it worked for me (pretty damn good, I might add).

For the bearings, went down to Kragen and rented kit #5 - slide hammer. This is a multi-function kit, that came in handy for more than just the slide hammer portion.

Started by using the 3-claw setup, claws facing outward. Make sure to slide the nut on, cup faces towards the claws (yes, I started without the cup, hahaha). We found this to not work for crap initially. However, it did mangle the rollers such that they started coming out of the old bearing. Not wanting any of the old rollers to end up in the diff, we pulled all of them, just leaving the bearing race. We attacked the bearing again, this time hooking on the closer side of the bearing race. That worked significantly better, and for the other side, we started by just pulling the rollers and cage from the bearing.

We then cleaned up the surface. I wasn't sure whether to pack the axle bearing or not. My Chilton guide said something about putting "axle lubricant" on it before installation, I don't know wtf "axle lubricant" is. I figured if I didn't pack it and it needed to be, I'd burn a bearing. If I did pack it and it didn't need to be, I'd get some wheel bearing grease co-mingling with the diff fluid.

I packed the bearing.

To install, I wiped out the surface, again, with a blue towel sprayed with chemtool. I set the packed bearing in, then using the "fwd axle tool" that came with Kit #5 - slide hammer, tamped the bearing in with my 4-lb cross-peen hammer (anything sledgy will work here) When it was mostly flush, I used the old bearing race between the bearing and the fwd axle tool to tamp it all the way into position. Seal was installed in the same manner.

Now we had to draw the studs into the axles. This was done by using my impact wrench (if you don't have an impact, I have no clue how you would go about this at home), a fresh pack of open-ended lug nuts and two washers. Insert stud into axle, put washers over it, thread nut, hit it with the impact until it was all the way through. We went through 4 lug nuts doing this for 10 studs - they just don't hold up to the torque. Luckily, they're designed to strip out before the studs do, so when you feel it start to slip, just keep hitting it with the impact until it's free-spinning. Then pull the lug nut off, unthread the threads left in the stud, grab a new lug nut, and keep going. If you have a small capacity air compressor like I do, make sure the tank is all the way full on pressure each time, you'll want all the torque you can get.

For installing the axles, the Chilton guide mentions O-rings. Where the C-clips go, there should be an O-ring. It should rest closer to the end. Near as I can tell, these O-rings are to keep the C-clip from rattling. We put new ones on both axles.

From here on it's downhill. We slid the axles in, being careful not to mangle the shiny new axle seals. It might take a little bit of finagling to get the axles to slide into the spider gears. Slide them in as far as you can, then insert the C-clip. Pull the axle back out, and the C-clip will slide back into it's home, and stay put. I suggest using a pair of needlenose pliers to insert the C-clips, unless you have TINY fingers.

With both axles in, we cleaned up the gasket surface on the diff cover, chemtooled the crap out of the inside, grabbed the new gasket, slid everything into place, and started putting the diff cover back on. Torque specs per the gasket were 30 ft-lbs, with an initial step at 15 (yeah, I used a torque wrench... lowest I've ever set one). Gasket had a specific pattern it wanted nuts tightened in, it's basically it's typical wheel/valvecover/head style criss-cross style tightening.

EDIT: With both axles in, o-ringed and C-clipped, don't forget to reinstall the locking pin and locking pin retaining bolt before you put the diff cover back on. I put a dab of red loctite on. I realized I forget to mention this about half-way through my dog-walk after posting this originally, hahaha.

Slid the new drums on. Ideally you should adjust your brakes here. I didn't, as it was dark, I have new brake shoes sitting on my counter, and I just wanted to get the car back on the ground.

Now for the fun part - filling the diff. Now, whoever at Ford who decided to put the fill plug on the front of the differential, and not on the cover, you need to get slapped. The diff plug is a square-drive inset - a 3/8" drive extension fits in there perfectly.

We rigged up a beer-bong style setup to get fluid from the quart containers of redline 75w-90 into the tiny horizontal hole, using a small funnel and a piece of clear tubing I had on another gear-oil pump. S-L-O-W-L-Y the fresh fluid went down into the diff. It probably took 15 minutes for both quarts (spec says 3.8ish pints, we spilled a little bit, I called it good).

Reinstalled the fluid plug, pulled the drain pan from under the diff, grabbed my 5-lug wheels, installed, rejacked the rear up, pulled the jackstands, set the car down, torqued the lugnuts to 85 ft-lbs.

Today, I tackle the front. :)
 

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you can use lincoln mark 7 front spindle assemblies,just need to make a thin shim to go over ball joint ,ball joint nut will tighten right up and not come loose, you can use aerostar axles but onley one side, one side is shorter then the other
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
i jsut picked up 95 rearend, spindles,hubs,brakes! o yea! rear disc too
95 rear end is a little wider, so you have to be careful about your wheel selection. Basically you need more backspacing to fit the same size wheel under the fenders. With my 9" rims on the foxbody-width axle, I'm gonna have to roll the fender slightly to keep it from mangling my tires should I ever take a decent impact - that's with almost a 6" backspace (stock for 17x9 Cobra wheels). With the wider SN95 rear axle, you're gonna want more backspace equal to half the extra width of the axle (a number I don't know off the top of my head).

You'll be fine with 8s, though, and it'll fill the wheelwell much nicer :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Got on the fronts yesterday, or "front" I should say, as I only managed to get ONE side done :mad:

For only being 5 bolts, EVERY SINGLE ONE fought me something fierce, and I ended up doing two tool runs and one parts run.

I will say, whoever says "SN95 brakes are better than foxbody brakes", I'd like a little bit of an explanation. Fox calipers are WAY easier to remove and install, the calipers are lighter, the piston looks to be the same size, and the pads are BIGGER. Maybe they work better, but on appearance alone, these are a letdown.

Also, the rotor appears to only be held on by the lugnuts and by being trapped by the caliper? That seems... odd. With the fox you have to pull the wheel bearings to get the rotor off (and you have to pull the rotor off to pull the spindle, FYI).

I'm hoping the improved geometry of the spindle is worth it.... I should be able to take it for a test drive tonight. Now that I have all the tools/tricks, the second side should take significantly less time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Passenger side went on like a dream. Car is hella toed-in because of the new geometry, but I'll get it aligned here shortly.

Now I'm running into a brake line issue, though. I have stainless braided lines on the car presently. The SN95 calipers have a ridge on the back, which is fine on the driver's side, forces the line to point "down", but on the passenger side it's the other way, and forces the line to point straight up into the wheel. It's driveable with the pizza cutters I picked up for street wheels (stock 15x7 3-spoke sixxer wheels.. they're hawt :rolleyes:) but my 17x9s are gonna rub like a mofo.

I do have th stock SN95 lines, but I'd really rather use my braided ones. Can I take an angle grinder to that ridge? I don't like that thought, but it would give me freedom to point the line whatever direction I want (i.e. not at my wheel).

Is there another option, other than the grinder, stock lines, or buying new lines?
 

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I just found this thread (with a search) and will possibly use the information sometime in the near future... Subscribed! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Okay, so I got this basically finished for now, at least for my STYLIN' new 3-spoke 15" sixxer wheels, hahaha.

I did the grinder thing on the caliper, and well, got a little aggressive with it and ended up nicking the mating surface for the banjo block. It leaked no matter what I did, so I ended up getting a new caliper (I paid way too much because I wanted it that day, but I could've picked one up for $22 from rockauto).

Took a different approach this time, and modified the banjo block on my stainless line to fit the caliper. MUCH better. No leaks! Got it aligned, and because I was sick and tired of rolling around in brake fluid, had them bleed the brakes, too. Was able to drive the car to work today for the first time since I actually started the swap.

Can't really give any definitive driving impressions because I'm rollin' on craptastic 205s right now and the roads were wet this morning - I was able to light up the tires at every intersection with just about 1/2 throttle, hahahah :D

Once this storm has passed, I'm gonna fit up my 17x9s, see what sort of hammering has to be done to keep things from rubbing, and take her for a good test run.
 
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