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Ok, so I know this is probably the wrong section for this but you guys are the people that I talk to on this forum and I respect your answers and opinions more than anyone else, so I hope this is not moved.

My question is, What is the difference between Diesel gasoline and regular unleaded gasoline. Other than the obvious that one is for diesel engines and one is for regular combustable engine. lol. Also why is diesel more expensive? Thanks Everyone.
 

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Diesel isn't always more expensive, just sort of depends on the area. Aside from the differences of the engines I don't know enough about the variances in the fuel type to explain it.
 

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Diesel isn't always more expensive, just sort of depends on the area. Aside from the differences of the engines I don't know enough about the variances in the fuel type to explain it.
Yea the price does vary but around me its always more than the 91 octane. 91 is the highest octane in my state. Its like $3.90 right now.
 

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I did some quick research and the main difference is that diesel is a more dense fuel source, it has higher greenhouse emissions, but has actually become more fuel efficient than back in the day when it was phased out of use of mainstream vehicles. The higher density fuel is needed for the way that a diesel engine works. Anyways, that's what I was able to find out.
 

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Diesel is a higher density fuel, and has a lot more octane. It explodes via compression, rather than a spark like a gasoline engine, and it's a cleaner fuel because of the way it ignites. It compresses all the air/fuel mix, and rather than relying on a spark to get it all, the compression itself causes most (well, a lot more than a gas engine) to explode .. giving them more power potential at less emissions.
 

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diesel is actually cheaper; just say its for heating the house and you can get it for a dollar less than reg gasoline:)
Unless you have a 2007 or newer vehicle which requires ultra low sulfur diesel and it destroys your catalytic converter and everything else dealing with the emissions. Not only that but using the heating oil emits a ton more caustic crap into the air.
 

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Yea the price does vary but around me its always more than the 91 octane. 91 is the highest octane in my state. Its like $3.90 right now.

Holy crap Batman! I just filled up with 93 octane for $3.29/gal. Diesel is about $3.71/gal., though.
 

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Holy crap Batman! I just filled up with 93 octane for $3.29/gal. Diesel is about $3.71/gal., though.
Diesel where I live is 4.09 a gallon. And regualr 87 oct is 315. 93 is 345.
 

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Diesel is more expensive right now for the same reason E85 is mroe expensive: production capacity.

Obviously everyone and their mother (and father, brother, sister, et cetera) uses gasoline, and there hasn't been a new refinery built in the US for about 30 years. So the oil companies refine as much oil into gasoline as possible because they know that's what sells the most. They are requried by laws (various) to provide the E85 and new ultra low sulfur diesel fuel. But that doesn't mean they have to provide much of it.

A secondary reason diesel is more expensive is this is the new ultra low sulfur diesel formulation as required by federal law. My guess is it costs more to refine.

Expect diesel prices to rise a little at the end of the year and starting next year. Mercedes already has a few models that take advantage of the diesel, BMW will have three here by the end of the year. Chrysler will have a variety, as will VW. Expect every manufacturer to follow suit next year.

In three years diesel should (barring unforeseen gov't regulation and taxation) be on par with gasoline due to economic balancing of supply and demand.


One offset to the high prices... well engineered biturbo diesel engines get close to 50% more gas mileage of gasoline counterparts. So it may cost more per gallon, but you're using much less of it.


A downside? Governments state and federal will watch these things like a hawk: it's pretty well known the UK claimed to have lost quite a crapload of money in decreased tax revenues when more than half of all the vehicles there started getting twice the gas mileage (I've read some educated speculatation that the London congestion tax is a direct result of that). You can sure as hell bet some states will go out of their way to make sure diesels can't be sold there. They'll back off when the voters realize they're getting shafted.
 

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Diesel isn't always more expensive, just sort of depends on the area. Aside from the differences of the engines I don't know enough about the variances in the fuel type to explain it.
In Alabama 87 is about $3.00-3.10 Diesel is $3.70-3.90!!!! 93 Octane can be about $3.30-3.40.

Its bullshit how marked up diesel is in my area.

Diesel is more expensive right now for the same reason E85 is mroe expensive: production capacity.

Obviously everyone and their mother (and father, brother, sister, et cetera) uses gasoline, and there hasn't been a new refinery built in the US for about 30 years. So the oil companies refine as much oil into gasoline as possible because they know that's what sells the most. They are requried by laws (various) to provide the E85 and new ultra low sulfur diesel fuel. But that doesn't mean they have to provide much of it.

A secondary reason diesel is more expensive is this is the new ultra low sulfur diesel formulation as required by federal law. My guess is it costs more to refine.

Expect diesel prices to rise a little at the end of the year and starting next year. Mercedes already has a few models that take advantage of the diesel, BMW will have three here by the end of the year. Chrysler will have a variety, as will VW. Expect every manufacturer to follow suit next year.

In three years diesel should (barring unforeseen gov't regulation and taxation) be on par with gasoline due to economic balancing of supply and demand.


One offset to the high prices... well engineered biturbo diesel engines get close to 50% more gas mileage of gasoline counterparts. So it may cost more per gallon, but you're using much less of it.


A downside? Governments state and federal will watch these things like a hawk: it's pretty well known the UK claimed to have lost quite a crapload of money in decreased tax revenues when more than half of all the vehicles there started getting twice the gas mileage (I've read some educated speculatation that the London congestion tax is a direct result of that). You can sure as hell bet some states will go out of their way to make sure diesels can't be sold there. They'll back off when the voters realize they're getting shafted.
Did you just write that?
 

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Diesel is more expensive right now for the same reason E85 is mroe expensive: production capacity.


In three years diesel should (barring unforeseen gov't regulation and taxation) be on par with gasoline due to economic balancing of supply and demand.


One offset to the high prices... well engineered biturbo diesel engines get close to 50% more gas mileage of gasoline counterparts. So it may cost more per gallon, but you're using much less of it.


A downside? Governments state and federal will watch these things like a hawk: it's pretty well known the UK claimed to have lost quite a crapload of money in decreased tax revenues when more than half of all the vehicles there started getting twice the gas mileage (I've read some educated speculatation that the London congestion tax is a direct result of that). You can sure as hell bet some states will go out of their way to make sure diesels can't be sold there. They'll back off when the voters realize they're getting shafted.
Are you saying that diesel will be increased as far as production? Here in NO. Michigan diesel costs typically 40 cents more per gallon and regular gas just went to $3.45 this morning. So I dont see gas being the same as diesel, just diesel increasing in cost due to increased demand from the cars being produced in the next few years.
 

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Are you saying that diesel will be increased as far as production? Here in NO. Michigan diesel costs typically 40 cents more per gallon and regular gas just went to $3.45 this morning. So I dont see gas being the same as diesel, just diesel increasing in cost due to increased demand from the cars being produced in the next few years.
When it comes to 25-45% of all the new cars being sold are diesel (I guess two to three years for that number), then it makes sense that 5 or so years later demand for regular gasoline will fall by 25-45%. At least. So I'm saying diesel should rise some as demand increases in the short term, when supply is changed to meet demand prices should regulate themselves into equilibrium, all else being equal.

In Europe new car sales of diesels are around 60% after 4-5 years of being on the market. People point and say US gas prices are cheaper... but you can fit most individual European countries into the state I live in... my guess is we drive quite a bit more on average and are equally as sensitive to price fluctuations.
 
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