Modded Mustang Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted a few questions last week regarding my 2000 V6 Mustang that stopped running. I'm hoping to bother you again for one more piece of advice. Do I drop a new engine in the car or get another one?

The car I'm looking into purchasing as a replacement is also a Mustang - 2003, V6, 63,000 miles and it's a really nice car. Aside from running great, it's also loaded with a stereo system, leather interior, new tires, alloy wheels, dual flowmaster exhaust etc. I'm also getting it for a good price because I'm buying it from the same guy I purchased the first mustang from. He'll probably take my old car with the seized engine, part it out and chop some $$$ off the asking price of the new car, (which is more than I'd get from a junkyard) but I'd have to get it financed and that means another monthly payment and another $5000-$7000 of debt. And there's no guarantee that in another 6 months the engine isn't going to mysteriously blow up on this car.

The old 2000 Mustang I've had for about 5 years now. until now there have been little to no problems and I've kept up all it's maintainance needs. Like I said, I have no idea why the engine seized, but the engine won't crank anymore, the plugs are fouled with oil and there are little puddles of oil under the hood. I found a scrapyard engine with 51,000 miles on it for $600, and it's going to cost another $1000-$1500 to install it with labor and parts. Though expensive, that's a lot cheaper than just buying another car. But the vehicle has 120,000 miles on it, and the engine isn't the only expensive part that's gonna go when the car gets old. Who's to say the tranny won't go in another 20,000 miles costing me another few thousand dollars? At that point I could have bought the newer car with less miles. But the car has been outstandingly reliable the five years I've owned it. The car is also showing it's age with it's share of dents, scratches and chipped paint. It's quite the predicament...

Either way I would have to finance the car or the repairs, but I'm stuck on what I should do. I hate to say it, but I've become quite attached to my old car and it makes me sad to think about someone else taking pieces off of it and then crushing the rest, but I don't want that affecting my descision and that's why I'm writing this question. I know it's long - but if you could take a second to tell me what you think - what YOU would do in this situation I would really really appreciate it.

Thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
In a similar situation with our 99 Mustang I removed the engine and rebuilt it which cost about $1500. The engine in our car seized due to lack of oil. It turns out it was vandalism, someone loosened the oil filter so all the oil leaked out.

The transmissions on these cars are supposed to last about 200k miles, so if you put in a used engine it should last that long.

I would say it's reasonable to repair the current vehicle. The one issue in putting large amounts of money into an older car is to not spend more than the value of the car since if it's in an accident the insurance won't compensate for that. However, in this case the ~$2K will be well under the book value of the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,145 Posts
I would take my engine someplace to rebuild it for you that way you get a waranty with it. any speck of dirt in any of the oil galleys, or passages, can score bearings, plug oil passages and cause a failure. If you do not measure and make sure your clearances are ok on teardown, then you wont know what they were and have nothing to go buy when you are putting it back together. I mean anything left unmeasured with a clearance that may be off can casue a failure. It is too many things to go wrong if you really do not know what you are fully doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
I would think a used engine would likely work out OK.

If you want to rebuild the seized engine you would want a machine shop to measure everything for you and tell you what size bearings, pistons etc. are needed. As a minimum going that route would require a rebore/new pistons, probably an align hone, resizing of the rods, and a reground crankshaft plus possibly guide work and surfacing of the heads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,145 Posts
ok, well i just wanted him to know that it is a lot of work to rebuild an engine.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top