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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Written by Cliff aka TheOtherFox
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Ed. Note - This is an excellent article using top notch fabrication techniques. However, since it involves modification of the throttle mechanism, you must exercise extreme caution and ensure that you fully understand what you are doing. If you mess things up, you might end up with a stuck throttle pedal which could result in property damage or personal injury. Do not attempt this modification unless you are fully qualified in the techniques described. Use common sense at all times. Neither the author, nor TECH Exchange personnel can be held responsible for the results that you may obtain.
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This is my first Article. I decided to start off with something simple that may help some of you.

Have you ever stomped on the gas and pulled the throttle cable straight out of the pedal assembly? I have, both with a carb setup and with fuel injection. The last time it happened was when I was taking my wife for the "first ride" after completing my resto. Never again. I think that was worse than if it had happened during a race.

The Ford design has a slot that a big plastic bushing goes into, and the throttle cable is through a smaller hole in the bushing. The cable can pull right through the plastic bushing (especially the ones that you typically find in the part store in the "performance" section. No names, but you know the ones I'm talking about.)

The better setup is to use the linkage that has a hole and bar through it. The first time I decided to mod the pedal, I just drilled a small hole that fit just the tiny ball on the end of the throttle cable (eliminating the plastic bushing) but the linkage was sticky and jerky and just didn't work well.

I finally spent some money on a quality Lokar cable, and this is how I attached it. The action is smoother than it has ever been, and fine control of the throttle is now possible, a blessing with my larger-than-stock throttle body.

The following pictures show the procedure.

These first two pictures show the throttle cable attachment point of the stock pedal assembly.





After cleaning the end, I made two cuts along the edges, then removed the center section. Using a pair of pliers, I bent it back and forth until it snapped off. A cutting wheel works best, but a hacksaw will also work.





Next, I pinched the two sides together as best I could using a combination of a pair of pliers, a body hammer, and a vise.







Next, I welded the two sides together. The steel the throttle pedal is made of is pretty strong, so I didn't worry about filling in all the gaps. You can if you want. After I had it welded, I filed and ground down the end until it was basically flat and parallel on both sides.





Next, I measured for the size of the hole that the crossbar would go through, and drilled a hole. Actually, I drilled the hole too close to the edge the first time, had to weld it shut, then drilled it right. A small pilot hole keeps the drill bit from wandering...lesson learned.



Once the hole is drilled, it is just a matter of connecting the linkage included with your throttle cable. Take a moment to think about how it will all go together before completely assembling it.







Painting and re-installing the throttle pedal is straightforward, so I'll leave that up to you. So far, I have had great results with this setup, and I no longer worry about matting the gas. The action is very smooth with no jerks when applying tiny pedal amounts while cruising. Even if it doesn't look very strong, it is. No more plastic bushings, and no more embarrassing breakdowns.

By the way, if you ever do have a throttle cable pull through on you, you can always wedge a small bit of paper in between the idle stop and the screw to get you home...ask me how I know!

-Cliff
 
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