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Zippy's Resident Milf
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Discussion Starter #1
Replacing the coils is much easier then you think. Despite what some might think, you do not have to remove the fuel rails. The coils will actually bend slightly and slip out from under the rail. We are not actually replacing ours, but removing them for paint. So ours are clean and in perfect shape. The procedure will be exactly the same though for coil replacement.

STOCK INTAKE REMOVAL

You do have to disconnect your intake to gain access to the coils that lay under it. Here is our old stock intake...



You disconnect the two air tubes conected to the intake ducting, close to the plenum. This one goes to the IAT sensor on the front of the plenum...





The other goes across the motor to the valve cover on the driver's side of the motor... This is part of the engine's crankcase pressure system...





Now we can disconnect the ducting at the throttle body itself. As this whole duct is made of rubber, there is no separate coupler. Just one hose clamp holds the unit to your throttle body on the front of the plenum. Simply unscrew the clamp with a slotted screw driver, or use the 8mm socket with an extension. A socket is always easier if it is in a reachable position. This duct is designed with positioning tabs on the ducting that will only allow the clamp to fit one way. This places the clamp screw right down on the front side right next to the TPS.





Now you just firmly grasp the ducting & wiggle it back and forth until it slips off the throttle body.



The factory duct is made of rubber, so it will be flexible enough to bend out of your way for access to the coils.
 

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Zippy's Resident Milf
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Discussion Starter #2
COIL REMOVAL

WOW now you can see the Accel coils... bright yellow. They are getting painted, but that is another write up... lol!

Passenger side:



Driver's side:



You will want to disconnect the electrical connector that goes to the coil... you need to depress the tab on the bottom. You can remove the electrical connector before or after the retaining bolt is removed. I removed the electrical connector first on this one. Normally, I try to remove the electrical connector first, but sometimes it is awkward and I can't get the tab depressed quite right. So, rather then chance messing up the connector, you can remove the bolt first you can get the coil to wiggle about, which might help you get the connector off easier.





Now slip the connector back and off.





Here is a shot of the connectors apart... coil's electrical connector...



The car's electrical connector... here is a better shot of the removal tab...





Get a 7mm socket and an extension on your ratchet. You gently loosen the bolts on the tab of the coils.





Once free of the threads in the intake, you can just pull the bolt right out.





Here you can see the coil will lift slightly off the mounting point on its own. This is why the coil bolt is needed. The rubber boot is actually pushing the coil up slightly because it's new.



You have to push down slightly and slip the coil out from under rail.





Once its clear of the fuel rail, you pull upwards on the coil and boot. An older coil should just slip out. If your boots and coil springs are still in good shape, you should hear a pop when the coil releases from the plug. It's normal if you don't, though. As the coil and spring age, they don't sit as tight as they did when they were new. In fact, in some cases, the coil pack itself can be reused and the boots and springs replaced.





A bit of wiggling and gentle pulling and it slips right out.



You repeat this for all of the coils on that side. I chose to lay them out in order so I could get the same ones back where they were. Even if you are doing a complete swap, it's not bad to detail where each coil came from. This could help you isolate any drivability concerns you may have currently or in the future. Especially if they continue after the swap or return a short time after.
 

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Zippy's Resident Milf
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Discussion Starter #3
Now on to the other side...

Here is the removal of one on this side, just in case something was not clear on the other one. Remove the coil pack retaining bolt...





Now remove the electrical connection. Again, you can do this before or after the bolt is removed.





Push down a bit and slip the coil out form under the fuel rail towards you.





This one had a tight boot and I had to get my hands down to grasp the boot and pull. You want to try to remove the coil as a unit to avoid risking any damage to the spring or boot.





The deep spark plug hole....



Coils on a rack in order of engine placement...



And the bolts in a box so we don't lose them.



I advise that you vacuum out or blow out the spark plug holes before you install the new coils. The boot is supposed to keep dirt & moisture out, but during removal, dirt can fall down in the holes. Our vacuum has nice long wand that can be used on the suction setting or it can be swapped over to blow air out.



 

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Zippy's Resident Milf
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5,592 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
COIL INSTALL

The install is always a bit more challenging then the removal. Mostly because the rubber boot and springs are new and give you some resistance going in. We will start with the easy side. Here is one on the driver's side. Grab your coil.





We need to insert the boot into the spark plug hole. You want to face the coil so that tab with the hole in it lines up with the threaded insert on the intake.





With the coil boot in the hole, you now have to slip it under the fuel rail. With new coils, the boots will give you some resistance, but it will slip under with some effort. Always push on the top of the coil, don't push at the electrical connector or you might damage it or the plastic housing.





Once it's under, you have to line the hole up so you can slip in the coil retention bolt.





Now it's time to drop in the bolt. When you first drop the bolt in, it might sit a bit high. It has caught the shoulder of the intake's insert hole. Just push down on the top of the coil and wiggle it around a bit. The bolt should slip past the shoulder on the insert and drop in the hole like below.





Run the bolt in with your fingers... you want to be able to feel that it slips in the threads super smooth. There should be no resistance. If there is, then you need to reorient the coil. It might be at a slight angle that you can't see. Gently move the coil around, pushing down on the top to better seat it and gently run the bolt in and out of the threads until there is no resistance. Then you know you have it in the right spot, so hold it there. You do not want to cross thread these bolts. Once you get them to run in easily with your hand, then you can use the ratchet to final tighten the bolt. Don't crank it down though. You want to take it just until it stops. If you overtighten it, the insert will break loose of the intake hole, then you can't get the coil out of the car! (I know this well because we are in that position thanks to someone at a shop being careless. We had to take the car to a shop when one spark plug blew out of the head and the spark plug hole had to be be repaired. Now you know why I do as much as possible myself.)





Now you want to connect the electrical connector. The tab will be on the bottom.





You should hear a small click when the connector fully seats. Then we added on our bolt cap cover for aesthetics.





Here is the whole driver side completed.

 

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Zippy's Resident Milf
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Discussion Starter #5
Now to the passenger side...





It's not just the intake being in the way that makes the passenger side more challenging. There are some items that sit a bit in your way. First an easy one to be sure you have the hang of it. This is the forward most one.





You drop the coils boot into the spark plug hole.





Make sure to line up the coil tab and intake hole. Then push down and slip the coil under the fuel rail.





It takes some pushing but it slips under, remember ONLY push on the top of the coil, not on the electrical connector. Then you need to line up the coil hole with the intake hole.





Just drop the bolt in. As before, the bolt might catch the shoulder and need a bit of wiggling to drop into the intake hole.





Now run the bolt in with your fingers... make sure the thread slips in easy. Again, there should be no resistance. It should be super easy to finger tighten.





Then you can proceed with the extension by hand, then finally finish it with the ratchet. Just gently tighten it until it stops. Do not overtighten or you will strip the insert out of the intake.





Next is the electrical plug in... tab to the bottom... it should slip on and click in place.





All done... just adding the bolt cap cover....



 

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Zippy's Resident Milf
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5,592 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Now on to the ones that give you trouble... the one under the TB. Its awkward due to the fuel rail line is in the way on the left. You have to turn the coil with the tab facing more towards the engine when you slip the boot in the spark plug hole.





The picture is dark, but once you get it past the fuel hardline, you can twist the coil so the tab is back in line with the intake hole it mounts to. Then just push it down and slip it under the fuel rail.





You can see the fuel rail connection better in this pic. Once seated, drop the bolt in place. Because of it's awkward position, I had to let the coil sit up a bit so I could line the bolt up with both holes.





Due to our plenum and TB combo unit, I had no choice but to run the bolt in with my fingers. Again, you want the bolt to slip in easy with your fingers. The TB sticks out so far that it puts the ratchet at such an awkward angle that the bolt will surely cross thread if we try to run it in with it. So I run it in as far as I can with my fingers, then I finish it off with the ratchet. As long as you get the bolt in far enough it will say on track even with the ratchet angled.





The rear most coil... looking at it, you can't see a clear shot to get the coil into the spark plug hole. I found it easiest to slip the coil through the looped heater hose to get a direct drop into the spark plug hole.





Here you can see it dropping in fine, with the coil tab lining up with the intake hole.





Just push it down and slip it forward under the fuel rail. It only goes under just a little bit. Now drop in your bolt.





I was having trouble getting my fingers down to tighten the bolt, so I used the extension in my hand. By doing it this way, I could still feel any resistance from the bolt if it was not going in straight. I then finished it off with the ratchet.





All done...

 

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Zippy's Resident Milf
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5,592 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
STOCK INTAKE INSTALL

For those with a stock intake... you just firmly grasp the ducting & wiggle it back and forth until it slips back on the throttle body.



Now we can connect the ducting at the throttle body itself. As this whole duct is made of rubber, there is no separate coupler. Just one hose clamp holds the unit to your throttle body on the front of the plenum. Simply screw the clamp tight. This duct is designed with positioning tabs on the ducting that will only allow the clamp to fit one way. This places the clamp screw right down on the front side right next to the TPS.





You need to reconnect the two air tubes connected to the intake ducting, close to the plenum. This one goes to the IAT sensor on the front of the plenum...





The other goes across the motor to the valve cover on the driver's side of the motor... this is part of the engine's crankcase pressure system.





Now you are all put back together.



We have a JLT cold air intake in this picture, so our finished product looks a bit different....

 
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