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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2000 mustang. The other day the front right brake began to smoke, so I got home and pulled the wheel and checked it out. I greased the slide pins and put it back together and it was fine for about a week and then started doing it again.
This time I replaced the caliper, brakes, and guide pins figuring that would certainly fix it. Got it all done and test drove it only to find out the rotor was almost twice as hot as the other side when I parked it (over 400*)!
Any idea what it could be? I also noticed after new caliper was on, that it was very hard to spin the rotor by hand (almost impossible). I know that can't be right. So what is wrong?
 

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He of Long Wind
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2,172 Posts
I think you got a bad caliper. I've had the hot-rotor problem on several cars over years. It's always been caliper related. Did you replace the bracket too?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think you got a bad caliper. I've had the hot-rotor problem on several cars over years. It's always been caliper related. Did you replace the bracket too?
Replaced everything with all new hardware too. I'm being told that the brake line could be bad even though it "looks" good from the outside. It's the only thing I didn't replace. The front lines are at least 8 years old. I don't know if previous owner ever replaced them or not. I may have accidentally damaged it the last time I replaced pads by twisting the rubber line and thinking it was no big deal. I'm taking it to the shop on Friday and let them figure it out....
 

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He of Long Wind
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Did you solve this problem? If not, I just thought of something. Rotor heat is basically pads not releasing (AKA ... hydraulic pressure in the lines/calipers even when the pedal has been released). I was thinking you could do a test to see if you can verify the restriction. Basically, pull the calipers from both sides (don't open the bleeders). Then take the cap of the M/C and use a big c-clamp and a block *(or just your hands if the parts are new) to squeeze the pad back into the caliper. Compare the pressure required on one side vs the other. A thought anyway ....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Did you solve this problem? If not, I just thought of something. Rotor heat is basically pads not releasing (AKA ... hydraulic pressure in the lines/calipers even when the pedal has been released). I was thinking you could do a test to see if you can verify the restriction. Basically, pull the calipers from both sides (don't open the bleeders). Then take the cap of the M/C and use a big c-clamp and a block *(or just your hands if the parts are new) to squeeze the pad back into the caliper. Compare the pressure required on one side vs the other. A thought anyway ....
Yes, the problem is solved. It was a bad brake hose. The hose "looked" good but apparently was damaged on the inside. Mechanic said there was enough pressure to force fluid past the blockage but not enough pressure after the brake was released, which kept pressure on the caliper pistons. Put a new hose on it and it was good to go.
 

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My 1991 F150 did the same thing. Right side caliper dragging causing the rotor to get hot. Replaced everything, new rebuilt caliper, cleaned and greased the pins. Worked good for a few days then started doing it again. The only thing left was the rubber brake hose. The old one looked good but changed it anyway. Brakes been working great for the last several years :)
 
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