Modded Mustang Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have had my 18X9's with p zero's on em for about 15-20K and they are cupping bad with a good alighment on he car any ideas? Also they are directional so..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I would have to check, would size make a difference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
They are aftermarket and I keep them at 32 warm temps. Front wheeled drive, rear tires are prone to it, I have never seen it on a RWD. It doesn't seem to be a camber problem cause it would just wear it down not cupped. Tomorrow if the weather clears up i will try and post a pic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Quick edit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
You have them over inflated, even if you are running the factory sugested pressure found on the inside of the driver door you may need to adjust acordingly having variations with tire widths, when you over inflate it puts to much pressure on the center of the tire causing center ware and cuping, I have to adjust my 4x4 truck every time I haul a load or pull my horse or I get bad cup. If you read the max tire req. on the side of the tire and inflate to that it is more than the load you are carrying and you will get cup! Thats my experience anyway
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Caster could be off, have you lowered your vehicle? Imbalanced tires could also be the culprit, as can worn, faulty or damaged suspension parts or wheel bearings. Has anything happened that could have damaged the suspension? Since you're posting in the 05+ forum, I'm assuming the car is too new to have badly worn parts, but they could possibly be defective.
 

·
IBEATU
Joined
·
5,919 Posts
No guys, not rotating will not cause cupping. It will cause your tires to wear unevenly, but not cupping. I think it may be a strut problem. For those of you who dont know what it is, this despcription may help.

Additional Infor
Cupping below article/pic


Tire Inflation
Proper tire inflation is a key ingredient in driving safety and long tire life. It is wise to check your tire's inflation at least once a month with an accurate tire pressure gauge. Continuous loss of inflation pressure is an indication of a possible tire/wheel assembly problem; consult your tire professional immediately if you encounter this situation. Be sure to check the pressure while the tires are cold, and have not been used recently. If you drive even a mile this will cause your tire pressure to increase and give you an inaccurate reading.
</B>Back to the top





Checking Tire Tread
There are two popular ways for checking to see if there is enough tread on your tires. All passenger, light truck, and medium commercial tires have tread wear indicator bars molded into the tread. These bars are located at the bottoms of the tread grooves in several locations around the tire, and when the tire is worn to the point where any of them become visibly flush with the adjacent tread ribs, it is time to replace the tire. Another easy way to check that your tire has enough tread remaining is to place a penny in the tread with Lincoln's head upside down and facing you. if you can see the top of Lincoln's head it is time to replace your tires.



Wear On Both Edges: UNDER INFLATION</B> If a tire looks like this, it may be under inflated. The worst enemy a tire can have is too little inflation pressure. Under inflation reduces treadlife through increased tread wear on the outside edges (or shoulders) of the tire. It also generates excessive heat which reduces tire durability. Finally, it reduces fuel economy through increased rolling resistance (soft tires makes your vehicle work harder). Check your tires regularly for proper inflation. Abnormal tire wear may also be due to misalignment or mechanical problems. Many </B>Goodyear retailers can provide expert diagnosis and repair.









Wear In Center: OVER INFLATION When a tire is over inflated, the center of the tread bears most of the load and wears out faster than the outside edges. Uneven wear reduces the useful life of a tire. Check your tires regularly for proper inflation. Abnormal tire wear may also be due to misalignment or mechanical problems. Goodyear retailers can provide expert diagnosis and repair.

</B>







Cups or Dips in the tread: WORN PARTS Cupping (also called dipping or scalloping) is most common on front tires, though rear tires can cup as well. It may be a sign that wheels are out of balance or that suspension or steering system parts are worn out. Many Goodyear retailers can provide expert diagnosis and repair.

</B>







Sawtooth edges: MISALIGNMENT Do the edges of the tread take on a sawtooth or feathered appearance? This is caused by erratic scrubbing against the road. The solution is toe-in or toe-out alignment correction.

</B>

Proper tread depth is essential for proper tire performance. If you notice a loss or change in wet traction, you may not have enough tread left on your tires. Once the tread depth reaches 1/16th of an inch it must be replaced.
 

·
booooost'd
Joined
·
7,545 Posts
You have them over inflated, even if you are running the factory sugested pressure found on the inside of the driver door you may need to adjust acordingly having variations with tire widths, when you over inflate it puts to much pressure on the center of the tire causing center ware and cuping, I have to adjust my 4x4 truck every time I haul a load or pull my horse or I get bad cup. If you read the max tire req. on the side of the tire and inflate to that it is more than the load you are carrying and you will get cup! Thats my experience anyway
Tires don't cup from over inflating;) Not having enough air makes them cup. Too much air causes the center to wear out faster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
good info thanks Mike, Ryan you have any links or info to calculate what the correct press should be with different size, profile tires? Cause what Ryan says could be correct under inflation coupled with Fords notorious camber issues could explain the cupping on just the inside of the tires???:popcorn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
I don't know if there is a pressure req, chart for a wider tire per weight of our S197's, but I also thought cupping is the uneven ware that occurs in the center of the tire, not the outside edge. If yours waring in the middle/ that is over inflation. I would look at the max tire pressure which on my factory P Zero's is 45 pounds and the sugested presure on the door sticker is 32 pounds. That is roughly a 25 percent reduction in factory Max. All tires are so much different in engineering that to guess that you should reduce by 25% would be ludicrus. My tire dealers rule of thumb is 35 PSI but I think your best bet would be to go on line and ask an expert, thats what I always do, none of us run enough tests or have the equipment to test all the posibilities but I bet you can find someone who does pretty quick and then post your findings! Sorry for my lack of help but I do my best if I can.:sorry If the ware is on the inside edge I would go with a set of caster camber plates and throw in a strut tower brace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Thanks good info!
 

·
booooost'd
Joined
·
7,545 Posts
You should run 32-35 psi in your tires. I run 36 in mine, but I have 20's. are both edges wearing on your tires, or is it just the inside? because if it's just the inside, it has nothing to do with your tire pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Just the inside and when the weather breaks I will get some pics posted.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top