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If you wanna go the cheap route cutting your stock springs would be your best bet. If you wanna do it right go H&R or eibach lowering springs. Depending on your springs you might wanna buy new shocks/struts. Theres a lot more people here with a lot more knowledge on this subject so i'd wait for more replies.
 

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Too Soon, Junior!
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Yeah, doing it correctly involves springs, struts, and CC plates. I'd love to just cut my springs and call it a day but I have an ultimate goal for what I want my car to be and being able to enter a corner at 50 mph and not understeer me into a tree is a part of that goal. Cutting the springs too much will wear out the struts quickly and the ride quality will suck. I've heard it's good for a drag setup though, check out the suspension guide by jazzer.
 

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Abyssinian of AX
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OP... are you just looking to lower your ride for appearance, or do you want an improvement in performance?

If just lowering down to get away from the 4x4 look, any number of lowering springs to drop you around 1.25"~1.5" is going to get a nice look and not require new shocks/struts. Your car will ride a bit rougher due to somewhat heavier springs as well as semi-compressed standing position of the shocks/struts.

Jazzer :)
 

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i made a custom lowering kit on mine, lowered about 3 inches in the front and 2 in the back, all i need to do for adjustment is get a big wrench and crank a bolt from the bottom. too cheap for lowering springs haha.
 

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If you wanna go the cheap route cutting your stock springs would be your best bet. If you wanna do it right go H&R or eibach lowering springs. Depending on your springs you might wanna buy new shocks/struts. Theres a lot more people here with a lot more knowledge on this subject so i'd wait for more replies.
Please do not cut progressive springs (stock springs are progessive on the gt). If you can afford a newer car, you can afford the $200 for springs (might take some time, but regardles...). I, along with many others, talk about why progressive springs should not be cut.

Basically, the progressive spring does more than just support load, it also works in the dampining of the suspension. So in other words, the spring works to a certain extent as a shock. In a linear spring, it will flex in a more constant rate.

Simplest way I think I can explain it...On a linear spring it will always take a set amount of minimal force to proportionaly flex the spring. On a progressive spring, it still takes a certain minamal force to start flexing but it will get progressively harder to compress as you put more pressure on it.

Think of the progressive spring as folding a piece of paper, yes it is easy to do at first, but as you keep folding it, it will become harder and harder to do. I think that is the easiest way I can explain how they work...just look at the spring and you will see how it starts out as loosely wrapped, and then becomes tighter coiled.

Yes there are lowering springs that are progressive, but if you compare them to cutting a stock spring, you will see that they have a different proportion of how they wrapped the coils, and also start making the metal thicker earlier.

I hope this makes some sort of sense, lol.
 

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Please do not cut progressive springs (stock springs are progessive on the gt). If you can afford a newer car, you can afford the $200 for springs (might take some time, but regardles...). I, along with many others, talk about why progressive springs should not be cut.

Basically, the progressive spring does more than just support load, it also works in the dampining of the suspension. So in other words, the spring works to a certain extent as a shock. In a linear spring, it will flex in a more constant rate.

Simplest way I think I can explain it...On a linear spring it will always take a set amount of minimal force to proportionaly flex the spring. On a progressive spring, it still takes a certain minamal force to start flexing but it will get progressively harder to compress as you put more pressure on it.

Think of the progressive spring as folding a piece of paper, yes it is easy to do at first, but as you keep folding it, it will become harder and harder to do. I think that is the easiest way I can explain how they work...just look at the spring and you will see how it starts out as loosely wrapped, and then becomes tighter coiled.

Yes there are lowering springs that are progressive, but if you compare them to cutting a stock spring, you will see that they have a different proportion of how they wrapped the coils, and also start making the metal thicker earlier.

I hope this makes some sort of sense, lol.
I wouldn't suggest it either, but OP i think was looking for the cheapest route and i know a few people on this forum have cut there springs with no ill effects.
 

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I wouldn't suggest it either, but OP i think was looking for the cheapest route and i know a few people on this forum have cut there springs with no ill effects.
I'll argue it all day that they do have il effects. There is no arguing that ride quality will suffer, some might just not be as picky as others. What I will argue is that doing this will reduce the effective life of the shocks/struts. By doing this, they are now taking much more of the load than orignally designed...hence why all of the aftermarket springs are actually engineered to do this job.
 

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jrock,

maybe a better place to start is to post what sort of budget you have. I think it'll be easier for the board to set you up.

Me? On a budget I'd do the following:

Tokicko D-Specs
Steeda Pros
MM CC plates
MM bumpsteer kit

John
 

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You can definitely cut progressive rate springs without side effects if you know what you are doing. Hell, chip foose does it on occasion to get the look he wants, and he would not do something that is going to look good but not work well.

You cut off what are called dead coils. These are the coils that when the spring is unflexed, are still sitting on top of eachother. You can cut these ones off without an issue if you only cutt off a small amount. The issue is if you cutt into the springs that do something. Then you are messing up the way the spring actually works with your suspension. You also may cutt them too low and end up with your shocks bottoming out and there by blowing them.

I'm not saying its a good idea to cut springs, I don't really like it my self. But, it can be done in a way that will not hurt anything.
 
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