Modded Mustang Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
..when a classic is worth buying? I would love to invest in an older Mustang and I'm looking through postings on craigslist BUT, to be honest with you I know very little about cars. I'm in the market, however, and I want to buy something worth putting money into.. something that I can look at years down the road and be proud of. It'd be nice to take on a project like this and use it as a learning experience.. and a new hobby. I will be driving the car (I'm actually in need of a vehicle), so I'll need it to run without problems obviously. That's where my concerns lie.

What year should I be looking for? The two most reasonable.. (well, within my price range) that I've seen so far, IMO, are a 1970 "running, driving project" has a 351 factory m strocker rmotor, posi, ps, at, new 3" exhaust w/ flow masters and dump outs at headers, new wheels tires, brakes,bumper,valance... Never been crashed or taken apart. BUT a lot of that means nothing to me.. might as well be speaking a different language.. from the pictures i've seen, the body is in pretty good condition.

The other is a 66 inline 6, automatic. "Project started and lost interest. All of the hard stuff done." Having the hard stuff done is honestly kind of appealing to me. The body again on this one looks pretty solid.. needs painted, both cars do.

Both are priced at $2500 obo. Is that reasonable? A good deal even? I'm not really sure what I'm looking for.. I'm big on how a car sounds. I simply have a vision :p I know I have a lot to learn. How much should I expect to spend fixing up a car of this age?

Any help is appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
The only investing should be in the adventure of the restoration, as an investment you will lose lots of $$$$.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,813 Posts
First thing I would do is look at what body styles you like. Then while looking you can focus on the ones you like.

64 1/2-66

coupe:


fastback:


67-68

coupe:


fastback:


69-70

coupe:


sportsroof:


71-73

coupe:


sportsroof:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
^+1

One thing to consider is that car 2 was taken apart, and may no longer have ALL the pieces to go back together how it was before hand. You need to go and look at both these vehicles before you do any consideration of which you want to buy (unless your a guy dead set on a 70 not a 66 or a v8 over a sixer, etc). Look over all the body, underneath, in the wheel wells, all the crevices, use a magnet wrapped in cloth to check for bondo (some bondo isn't bad, but if you discover that the magnet 80% of the quarter panel you'll want to keep that in mind and maybe walk away from the car depending on how much your willing to invest into the car). Check to see if all the pieces are there. Maybe go to a car show and look over similar classic there so you'll have an idea/picture of what all should be there on the potential project car your looking at. If you do go to a car show that would also be an excellent time to ask someone there with a restored version of what you're looking at questions pertaining to what all they had to do, what they recommend you do, things to look for on that particular model, and things like that. Also the car show route can help give you an idea of what you want your car to be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
What? Is this a joke?

not to be rude but I stopped reading after the first paragraph because you are completely off when it comes to what you want, but hey it's not your fault, after all you are starting in the right place (on a forum) asking questions

let me precede what I am about to say by sharing that I did what you are describing when i bought a Harley, which since I have sold, so I speak from first hand experience (purchase price $5,000 invested $7,000, sold for $5,000 honest to god truth, more upon request partially what killed the sale was that I found out it was a salvaged title, lesson learned)

anyway first of all (despite what the classic car sales guy tells you) seldom is a vehicle an "investment" it is more like a money pit, however don't get me wrong, you are not exactly standing in the driveway burning $50 dollar bills, it can be very enjoyable even if you are spending a lot of money on the car, the thrill of finding rare parts, finding good deals, bartering, trading, etc, making long lasting friendships, all that can be rewarding even when you don't sell the car for what you paid for, but getting ripped off by the engine rebuild guy, or the half @ss painter, is not

second you state you know very little about cars, well you need to learn, or you will get taken, and you will regret it, and you will hate the car, you always need to tinker with a classic, ok, one day it won't start, the next day it will pull to the left for some reason, not to mention all the rattling noises, some easy fixes if you know what to look for, and how to fix them, on the other hand super frustrating to a beginner, let me say this in another way, you need to learn on a cheap car before you buy a '69 Fastback, the Fastback is not the vehicle to learn how to MIG weld the floor pans on, the 75 Pinto is

third you need a vehicle to drive, seriously when I read that I thought you were putting us on, because all of your goals completely contradict each other, this one especially, you see when you buy a classic you can spend years restoring it (as it sits on a roticery or jack stands), especially if you are one guy and not a professional with all the tools and a facility, a shop to do it in, DRIVE THE VEHICLE, are you kidding me, rule number one of owning a classic is own a second vehicle, either a truck to use as a parts hauler or a HONDA to get you places when you need to be places, LOL

now don't take me for a jerk, I am kidding but I am also trying to get a message across, you can do it, but realign your goals and your expectations, buy a daily driver, do your own maintenance, oil changes, flush the coolant, replace the spark plugs, do your brakes, then when you get used to the black grease underneath your fingernails buy a classic, or when your wallet swells up farm out all the work to the, upholsterer, painter, machinist, mechanic, glass guy, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
First thing I would do is look at what body styles you like. Then while looking you can focus on the ones you like.
This is a wonderful post to help you out, Ford changed the Mustang a little bit every 2 years, so 65/66 sorta interchangeable, 67/68 brother and sister, 69/70 well you get the idea.

There are couple of ways to cut up the first generation Mustangs ie 64 1/2 through 73. The way above or by body style, coupe, fastback, convertible, etc. The Fastbacks are most "desirable" from the investment perspective, pronounces EXPENSIVE. Another way to look at them is by customization like the GT350 or the GT500 or the BOSS series, again EXPENSIVE. So if you land a barn find GT500 Fastback, catching!!!

One thing I learned that is worth sharing after I bought my 1968 Coupe is that if I had to do it all over again I would try to find the 65 or 66 models instead. It is very common for a car maker to make a wonderful car and then mess it up. You see the car maker says well if this slick small car is good, then what if we make it a bit wider, and a bit longer, and add this to it, and that to it, and pretty soon the pure essence of a small nibble car with a big engine gives way to a bloated heavy boat with a small engine, LOL (Same thing happend to the Nissan 240 which is a great little car, the 260 not so much, and then it got bigger and heavier from there).

just trying to help,
G
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,592 Posts
My dad and I restored his 66 Mustang. It's an AWESOME way to learn about cars. Old cars are MUCH MUCH easier to work on than new cars and you can learn the basics. Don't let people tell you to learn what you're doing before you have one. One of the first things I did as a kid was completely disassemble the engine w/out a clue how to put it back together. That's part of learning.

I would say driving the car and having it a project is a BAD idea. First, old Mustangs are TERRIBLY unsafe. You get into an accident and it's bad news for the driver. Second, the steering, braking, and suspension in old cars SUCKS compared to what you're used to driving. It takes miles to stop those cars on stock parts.

69-70

sportsroof:
69-70 Sportsroof.......... :drool :drool :love
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
@ Gregski - Wrong choice of words, should've revised my post. Thanks for being honest, though. I tend to get fascinated with an idea and I'm so caught up at the time that I don't even stop to really think about it.. and that's why I post of forums, lol. Rather be an anonymous idiot! I don't really see the point in putting a ton of money in something I won't be driving. Probably sounds naive. My dad has been a mechanic his whole life, so I'd always have a helping hand if I needed it. I was raised around the "upholsterer, painter, machinist, mechanic, glass guy, etc.". Should definitely be more knowledgeable about this type of stuff, but it never caught my interest before.

I do own a second vehicle, but I'm recently married, we've been moving, have a baby on the way, etc. I should probably be looking for something more reliable, but I like the idea of buying something I could have fun with.. even if it took me years and years to finish. Priorities again, right? Haha

@03SonicBoom - Ah, they are just trying to look out for me. No harm done.

"I would say driving the car and having it a project is a BAD idea. First, old Mustangs are TERRIBLY unsafe. You get into an accident and it's bad news for the driver. Second, the steering, braking, and suspension in old cars SUCKS compared to what you're used to driving. It takes miles to stop those cars on stock parts."

Honestly, I didn't even know that. I'm sure there are ways to upgrade that old suspension, braking, and steering to make it drive like a newer car though? Maybe I should just reconsider this whole project thing.

Where in Indiana are you BTW? I'm from Evansville. Will be moving back there in a few months actually, after my Active Duty time is up.

@ Everyone else - Thanks for the help/replies!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,592 Posts
Honestly, I didn't even know that. I'm sure there are ways to upgrade that old suspension, braking, and steering to make it drive like a newer car though? Maybe I should just reconsider this whole project thing.

Where in Indiana are you BTW? I'm from Evansville. Will be moving back there in a few months actually, after my Active Duty time is up.
Yes, you can always upgrade the suspension, braking, and everything. It just costs money. In all honesty, old Mustang parts are so common you could probably completely build a complete car just from replacement parts. But you can buy entire modern suspension and brake kits for about $4k. You don't realize how good modern equipement is until you try driving on equipement made in 1966 (even if it was top of the line disc brakes at the time).

I'm in Bloomington.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top