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Well i cranked my car for the first time lastnight and got her running with no issues other than a bad o2 and some small vac leaks and exhaust leaks.


Anyways tried hooking up my wideband and for the love of god i cant figure it out. Its a innovated wideband lc1, i couldnt find any how to's about this install.

Reps to those that help, thanks.
 

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I dont own an LC-1 but looking at the documentation, depending on wether you have 6 or 7 wires I think it wont matter aside from how many wires are being grounded together but I will assume you have the one with 6 wires.

Red Wire connect to a circuit that has power when you to turn the key to on not run. Cleanest way to do this is to use a circuit tester http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200589483_200589483?cm_mmc=Google-pla-_-Auto%20Repair-_-Automotive%20Diagnostics-_-680482&ci_sku=680482&ci_gpa=pla&ci_kw={keyword}&gclid=CIytlfD5sbQCFQqe4AodB2QAUw and add a circuit http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?partnumber=071-580&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=pla&utm_term=%7Bkeyword%7D you can find both of these items at advance auto parts. Basically you put the alligator clip of the circuit tester to a ground point, if you looking at the fuse box under the dash its sitting on a metal frame just clip on there and then use the tip of the tester on the little metal tabs that stick out the back of the fuse. See which ones come on when the key is turned to on. Once you find a suitable circuit pull out that fuse and put it into the ad a circuit side where there is no wire going to it. And on the side with the wire add a 5A circuit, I believe thats the max it can handle on the wired side. It sounds confusing but if you read the box its pretty easy. Than take the red wire and crimp it onto the but connector on the end of the add a circuit, you can use some heat shrink over the butt connector too but since its inside the car its probably fine.

Next take the blue and whit wires and strip them a little bit and crimp both of them to a ring terminal heres a pic
make sure you use a ring terminal sized correctly to the wire that comes with the LC-1 I dont see it in the manual but im guessing its anywhere between 18-22 AWG wire. You can ground it right to one of the bolts holding the fuse panel onto the dashboard. Also make sure to get a ring terminal that will fit over the bolt, its also a good idea to take some sand paper and clean up where the ring terminal will contact the metal framing. The manual suggests that you solder the wires to the ring terminal once its crimped on but if you dont have accesss to one you should be fine, just make sure its a good tight crimp, a way to test this is to tug on the wire a few times and make sure it doesn't slip out of the ring terminal. I would also shrink tube this but again you dont have to.

Next wire the yellow wire , Analog output 1, to the gauge, and ground the gauge to the same location as the other two using another ring terminal.

If you have the calibration push button LED just look at page 6 in the manual to see where it hooks up.

Hopefully this helps a bit, If you have any questions or if you feel what i wrote doesnt make sense let me know I can try to explain it a little better.

Also this tool is defintaley required for the job, http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_...0P&srccode=cii_17588969&cpncode=31-64047143-2 , it doesnt have to be a craftsman one but as long as it has all the features of this one you should be good.
 

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Here are the connection points I used for my LC-1 with the G2 gauge:



The wiring diagram for the push-button switch and LED provided by Innovate is a bit confusing, here is a more clear illustration of that:

 
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Discussion Starter #6
Here are the connection points I used for my LC-1 with the G2 gauge:



The wiring diagram for the push-button switch and LED provided by Innovate is a bit confusing, here is a more clear illustration of that:

I dont own an LC-1 but looking at the documentation, depending on wether you have 6 or 7 wires I think it wont matter aside from how many wires are being grounded together but I will assume you have the one with 6 wires.

Red Wire connect to a circuit that has power when you to turn the key to on not run. Cleanest way to do this is to use a circuit tester Wel-Bilt Automotive Circuit Tester | Automotive Diagnostics| Northern Tool + Equipment and add a circuit Littelfuse Add-A-Circuit Fuseholder for ATO/ATC Fuses 071-580 you can find both of these items at advance auto parts. Basically you put the alligator clip of the circuit tester to a ground point, if you looking at the fuse box under the dash its sitting on a metal frame just clip on there and then use the tip of the tester on the little metal tabs that stick out the back of the fuse. See which ones come on when the key is turned to on. Once you find a suitable circuit pull out that fuse and put it into the ad a circuit side where there is no wire going to it. And on the side with the wire add a 5A circuit, I believe thats the max it can handle on the wired side. It sounds confusing but if you read the box its pretty easy. Than take the red wire and crimp it onto the but connector on the end of the add a circuit, you can use some heat shrink over the butt connector too but since its inside the car its probably fine.

Next take the blue and whit wires and strip them a little bit and crimp both of them to a ring terminal heres a pic
make sure you use a ring terminal sized correctly to the wire that comes with the LC-1 I dont see it in the manual but im guessing its anywhere between 18-22 AWG wire. You can ground it right to one of the bolts holding the fuse panel onto the dashboard. Also make sure to get a ring terminal that will fit over the bolt, its also a good idea to take some sand paper and clean up where the ring terminal will contact the metal framing. The manual suggests that you solder the wires to the ring terminal once its crimped on but if you dont have accesss to one you should be fine, just make sure its a good tight crimp, a way to test this is to tug on the wire a few times and make sure it doesn't slip out of the ring terminal. I would also shrink tube this but again you dont have to.

Next wire the yellow wire , Analog output 1, to the gauge, and ground the gauge to the same location as the other two using another ring terminal.

If you have the calibration push button LED just look at page 6 in the manual to see where it hooks up.

Hopefully this helps a bit, If you have any questions or if you feel what i wrote doesnt make sense let me know I can try to explain it a little better.

Also this tool is defintaley required for the job, Craftsman Wire Cutter-Stripper and Crimper Pliers, Up-Front, AWG Wire - Tools - Electricians Tools - Electrician Accessories , it doesnt have to be a craftsman one but as long as it has all the features of this one you should be good.
Thanks guys going to give this a try again tonight or tomorrow some time. Merry Christmas.
 

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Get a proper full-compression crimping tool if you plan to use crimp-on connectors--like this one from Harbor Freight:



The reason crimp-on connectors have such a bad reputation is from the experience of those who have used cheap "staking" or "squashing" style tools like those shown below:



Also make sure to the fill the connectors with dielectric grease before crimping, this will prevent corrosion and make a connection that is arguably better than if soldered.

Then once you have it crimped hold the connector and pull firmly on the wire--if it is not well crimped you want to know about it now rather than on the side of the road someplace.

I have made literally hundreds of motor vehicle electrical connections over the years, and when done with full compression crimpers and potted (with dielectric grease) connector I have never had one that survived the "pull test" fail...
 

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Get a proper full-compression crimping tool if you plan to use crimp-on connectors--like this one from Harbor Freight:
nice find those bastards have everything, can you change the dies on those? It doesn't look like you can crimp non insulated terminals. good tip on the grease never thought to use that I usually just solder and shrink tube everything. You can buy ring terminals with the grease in them already believe its the weather proof version that autozone or advance sells.
 

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I have an old full-compression tool made by Paladin Tools (no relation) that cost over $200, 30+ years ago. For all practical purposes it is of no higher quality then the $10 HF tool, the only difference being that the die-set in the Paladin crimper is machined from bar stock, where the dies in the HF tool are stacked stampings--in use it makes no difference.

My HF unit is 10 years old now, and it looks as though it may even last as long as the "high-priced spread"...
 

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Carving corners
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I have an old full-compression tool made by Paladin Tools (no relation) that cost over $200, 30+ years ago. For all practical purposes it is of no higher quality then the $10 HF tool, the only difference being that the die-set in the Paladin crimper is machined from bar stock, where the dies in the HF tool are stacked stampings--in use it makes no difference.

My HF unit is 10 years old now, and it looks as though it may even last as long as the "high-priced spread"...
I have quite bit of HF tools, except for ratchets and sockets, and im starting to notice either they're really good at copying others or others tools are being manufactured in the same plant with different logos. For instance I have a HLVP spray gun and its identical to the husky home depot version and ive used it countless times and it works really well. Some tools that I own aren't quite up to par are like vise grips and hose clamps they tend to twist along the pivot point and the jaws don't align after a while but everything else including c clamps etc work very well. Everyone looks down on them but i noticed the tool quality keeps improving as the years go by. For a DIYer at home they are great but if I were a professional mechanic etc I would definitely buy a higher quality tool.
 

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I have the sprayer with the 20 oz cup, the purple handle one that comes with a regulator--good unit.

35 years ago HF stuff was mail order only crap, 25 years ago it was much better but still happy-homeowner grade, 15 years ago it had become pretty decent, though they still had some real crap. Today most of it is pretty decent, and even the quality of the crap is greatly improved. I have the Sieg Industrial 7x14 lathe, and the mini-mill from HF and after disassembling, cleaning, deburring and scraping, relube and re-assemble they are very nice little tools.

I have a 3-axis DRO on the mill and it is as accurate as most "big" mills I have used:



OP, sorry for the hi-jack but you know how "tool-people" can be...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have the sprayer with the 20 oz cup, the purple handle one that comes with a regulator--good unit.

35 years ago HF stuff was mail order only crap, 25 years ago it was much better but still happy-homeowner grade, 15 years ago it had become pretty decent, though they still had some real crap. Today most of it is pretty decent, and even the quality of the crap is greatly improved. I have the Sieg Industrial 7x14 lathe, and the mini-mill from HF and after disassembling, cleaning, deburring and scraping, relube and re-assemble they are very nice little tools.

I have a 3-axis DRO on the mill and it is as accurate as most "big" mills I have used:



OP, sorry for the hi-jack but you know how "tool-people" can be...
Dont mind lol, like seeing tools anyways garage is over flowing with tools, Def need a drill press, lathes and band saw would be nice lol.
 

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Carving corners
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I have the sprayer with the 20 oz cup, the purple handle one that comes with a regulator--good unit.

35 years ago HF stuff was mail order only crap, 25 years ago it was much better but still happy-homeowner grade, 15 years ago it had become pretty decent, though they still had some real crap. Today most of it is pretty decent, and even the quality of the crap is greatly improved. I have the Sieg Industrial 7x14 lathe, and the mini-mill from HF and after disassembling, cleaning, deburring and scraping, relube and re-assemble they are very nice little tools.

I have a 3-axis DRO on the mill and it is as accurate as most "big" mills I have used:



OP, sorry for the hi-jack but you know how "tool-people" can be...
It's pretty impressive and for the most part if it does brake your usually like eh I only x amount for it anyway lol.
 
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