Modded Mustang Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello again,

Ok ok ok. I know you guys are sick of my questions lol and I apologies for that. Well hopefully this will be my last post for asking questions about the GT500 :D

Ok, I know i'm gonna get nuked for this, but here it goes !

I'm not a typical .... how to say .... Hmmmmmm.....

I ...... Ok ..... here it goes .....


I've driven .... Ok .... I have driven Manual transmission. for like 3 times in my whole life .......

So I'm not what you would call a "Pro" ... and based on what i have read in here. Anyone who buys an Automatic Mustang either gets shot or yelled at lol

So thank god that the GT500 only comes in Manual. lol

However ... How hard is it to drive a stick, specially with that amount of power ?

Second and most importantly, I know that on an Automatic car, when ever your driving and you just wanna go faster, you simply step on the gas !

However on a manual, you can't do that because you might be driving on the 4th gear for example. so even if you slam the gas peddle nothing will happen. that car will simply accelerate. but not as aggressive as when the automatic does it.

I know what your going to say, "No man when your on the fourth gear for example just go one gear back so go to the third" !!

But is this applicable Always ?? because i believe that this is ONLY applicable if I am on the Fourth Gear and the RPM is like on 3000 or 4000, then I can go back.

and when i go back to the third gear then the RPM will be higher like on 5000 to 6000 RPM ! so that will give me that boost i feel when i slam the gas pedal on my automatic crown victoria

But what if it is already on lets say 5000 RPM on the Fourth Gear ? and wanted to accelerate as in Burn Rubber ! should i go ahed and go back one gear ? based on my logic that might blow up the Engine ! because when i go back to third the RPM might be at 7000 and i know i suck at manual transmission, but at least know that this will bring me to the red zone therefore it is BAD.

I have been watching, studying youtube manual transmission videos. all of them just simply tell ya how to get the car moving as in to teach how to release the clutch and add gas to give the car a smooth move. but nothing that teaches ya how to actually follow that car that flew by you so you can drive right pass it again and then look the driver in the eye and say "Yeah ... you suck" lol


And thats it, please feel free to make fun and i know nothing will stop ya lol

LET THE MAKING FUN BEGINS ! lol
 

·
Not a Rational Car Guy
Joined
·
38,186 Posts
Honestly we can sit here and describe back and fourth the proper way to do it. But the best way is just to get out and do it. You'll learn what's comfortable for you. I didn't read the whole thing but I quickly skimmed through it. Just go rent a GT-500 for the day ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Honestly we can sit here and describe back and fourth the proper way to do it. But the best way is just to get out and do it. You'll learn what's comfortable for you. I didn't read the whole thing but I quickly skimmed through it. Just go rent a GT-500 for the day ;)
Like they rent sport cars over here lefty lol they only rent Crown Victoria's and 4x4 cars for the Desert and thats it lol

At least you didn't made fun of me lol :D
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
83,767 Posts
If you can comprehend this writeup I made, give it a whirl.


If not, slowly back away from the thread

















All right.

I think the first thing to do is understand the basics of what is going on. I don't know if you know these basics, but I'll cover them anyway.

The engine and transmission are connected by the clutch. The clutch consists of a pressure plate, which is a device with springs in it, and the clutch disc which is made of a material similar to your brake pads.

The clutch disc rests against the flywheel, which is connected to the crankshaft. The pressure plate holds the disc against the flywheel using springs.

The clutch slides on to a splined shaft, called the input shaft, of the transmission. It can slide on these splines. When you step on the clutch, you are pulling the clutch disc away from the flywheel, disengaging the engine from the transmission, or, more specifically, the clutch disc from the flywheel.



The first thing to understand is that many people over complicate shifting. It's really pretty basic.

First of all, double clutching is a method utilized for transmissions without synchros, and is a method used for driving heavy trucks. There is no need for it in a passenger car.

Second. It goes without saying that using the clutch to hold the car on a hill is silly. You are wasting the clutch, and it's not a safe practice.

So. The first thing in actually driving away, is the launch, or taking off.

When someone is first learning how to drive a manual, they should practice in an empty parking lot.

Starting off in first, you should slowly let the clutch out while paying attention to where it first starts to drag the engine down. Note what point the pedal is at in it's upward travel at the point the clutch begins to drag on the engine, or, engage.

When you become familiarized with that point, you should know that this is also the point you should apply a little bit of throttle. This should be one smooth movement. Your leg starts to let the clutch pedal up, and, as it starts to engage, you are applying throttle at that point, while continuing to release the clutch in a smooth manner. You should be able to let the clutch pedal up relatively quickly, not fast, but smoothly, as you accelerate. Picture your leg going up and your foot going down at the same time in one smooth motion.

A similar method is used as you shift through the gears. When you are ready to shift to second, you begin to depress the clutch pedal, or disengage the clutch, as your hand moves the shifter out of first gear. When the clutch is fully disengaged, or the pedal is all the way down, the shifter should just be entering second gear. Just as you enter second, your left leg should be releasing the clutch, and your right foot should be rolling on to the throttle as the clutch engages. You will know where it engages by feel, and from your practice starting which caused you to memorize at which point in the pedal's travel your clutch begins to engage.

Also picture your arm and your clutch leg moving at the same time. As your leg is pressing the clutch pedal, your right arm is moving the shifter from 1st to 2nd gear. Obviously your clutch leg starts a bit before your arm movement, but once your clutch leg is moving, your arm should be moving the shifter.

The reason it's easier to get rolling in reverse is because reverse is a lower gear. The lower the gear the easier to get the car moving. The gear has a different number of teeth on it, as does each gear in the transmission.

Picture a bicycle. Same principle. Different amount of teeth = different ratios.

As for downshifting, don't be scared of rev matching. Like starting off and shifting, all it takes is practice.

If, for example, you want to downshift from 3rd to second at a given speed, what you should first do, is drive along in second at that speed, and pay attention to where the rpm is at that speed.

So, if we are now driving along at that speed in 3rd gear, we know that we must be at 'x' rpm to rev match the downshift to second gear.

So, to do the downshift, you step on the clutch as your arm pulls the shifter out of 3rd gear and into second gear. At the point where the clutch is fully disengaged, your right foot blips the throttle up to just above the rpm you know you need to be at for that speed in second gear, and just after blipping the throttle, your left leg lets the clutch out. Quickly, smoothly, but not suddenly. If you do it right, the car should not lurch at all. It takes practice, and paying attention to what rpm your engine is at at a particular speed and in a particular gear, so that you know what you have to rev it up to to perform a particular downshift at that speed.

When you practice, and pay attention, after a while, it will become so second nature. I've done it for so long, I can't even give you an example of exact rpm vs speed vs gear in my car. I just know it by listening.

The biggest key to practicing rev matching on your downshifts is to start by doing it at lower rpm. That way, when you **** it up until you get used to it, the car is not lurching,and you aren't hurting anything, and won't lose control. You can really **** **** up if you try it at to high a speed and too high an rpm.

And remember, pay attention. When you do it, as you let the clutch out, if the engine rpm jumps and/or the car lurches because you misjudged, simply step on the clutch quickly and try again.

That's the biggest thing. People over complicate it, and wind up actually not paying attention to the rpm, the speed, and what those two are at versus a given gear. Your left leg and your right foot control everything. By paying attention, your brain will memorize where to rev it up to on the downshift, and if you also listen, you should eventually be able to do it by ear.

One final word on hills. Obviously you understand that you don't use the clutch to hold the car. You use the brakes.

So, once you have learned at what point your clutch begins to engage, you simply keep your right foot on the brake, begin to let the clutch out, and just as it begins to engage you shift your right foot on to the gas pedal and roll on to the throttle.

Rolling is a key word. Practice controlling your ankle. Driving a big truck is good practice, because some of them ride so rough, that when you're a new driver, the bouncing truck will cause your right foot to bounce, making your shifting all herky-jerky. So when you are learning, you quickly learn to focus on forcing your right foot to roll on to the throttle. Even if you botch a shift, don't let your right foot jerk around. Always picture your foot rolling on to the throttle smoothly.

Just pay attention to your rpm, speed, and what the two are like in each gear, and remember. And listen to the engine as you do it.



Thus endeth today's lesson. Next time we'll cover power shifting. lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you can comprehend this writeup I made, give it a whirl.

If not, slowly back away from the thread
LOL

We ofcourse i understand that,

Ok so as far as Downshifting goes, it will be learned by practice. by time.

However regarding the hill driving, you mentioned that it is better to keep your foot on breaks then move it to gas as you let go of the clutch.

Well isn't that strategy good when driving "Downhill" ?

Because i remember i heard it somewhere, that when driving "Uphill" always use the "Break stick" which is on your tight, next to the gear box ?

so you don't roll down by accident.

Any way i really appreciate the info "TheUNZippee!". much appreciated :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
really, just drive it around for a week and you'll for sure get the hang of the downshifting and such.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
83,767 Posts
LOL

We ofcourse i understand that,

Ok so as far as Downshifting goes, it will be learned by practice. by time.

However regarding the hill driving, you mentioned that it is better to keep your foot on breaks then move it to gas as you let go of the clutch.

Well isn't that strategy good when driving "Downhill" ?

Because i remember i heard it somewhere, that when driving "Uphill" always use the "Break stick" which is on your tight, next to the gear box ?

so you don't roll down by accident.

Any way i really appreciate the info "TheUNZippee!". much appreciated :D
Well things are a little easier when starting off downhill. You don't have to worry about the car rolling backwards into the car behind you.

Some people use the parking brake (I believe this is what you are referring to) to help hold the car on an uphill grade, and then when they are ready to start driving away, they let the clutch out (disengage),give it a little gas as it starts to engage (grab, or put a load on the engine), and as soon as it grabs they release the parking brake.

With practice, you don't need to do this. I've never done it in 25 years of driving manual transmissions.

It just takes timing, getting to know your particular car and where in the pedal travel the clutch engages. With practice, you will be able to, all in one smooth motion, while sitting on a hill:

Start letting the clutch out as:
You have moved your foot from the brake to the gas, applying a touch of gas just as the clutch engages.

Ideally, the clutch will JUST have started to grab (engage) a split second before transferring your right foot from brake to gas.




As stated by both Thumbie and Lefty, get out there and do it. Just take your time, practice, and don't get upset when you **** up a shift. Just keep doing it until you get it right.



And anytime man. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
yes, don't ever worry about messing up. the clutch is stronger in those cars, and you would have to really try to burn it out to the point of it starting to break
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well i guess there is nothing better than actually getting to it and trying the real thing.

I believe my questions are done now. all questions have been marked "Check".

So no more threads of questions no more inquiries.

My next post should be "MY FIRST NEW SHELBY MUSTANG GT500" lol :D

Thanks again guys for all the support and help. Much appreciated :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
Well i guess there is nothing better than actually getting to it and trying the real thing.

I believe my questions are done now. all questions have been marked "Check".

So no more threads of questions no more inquiries.

My next post should be "MY FIRST NEW SHELBY MUSTANG GT500" lol :D

Thanks again guys for all the support and help. Much appreciated :)
boy, there better be pics galore of that beast
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,055 Posts
well ive borrow a friend's of mine hyundai accent and drove it around the parking lot for roughly an hour or 2 before i learned how to do it smoothly. once i got in the gt500, i jerked a couple times getting used to it (all cars operates differently) but after driving around for a while i got it pretty well. for a 500 hp beast, its actually quite calm to drive when you drive normally and when you need to drop the hammer, the beast will come roaring out. :D

zippee pretty much covered everything id say. although i do have a good rule of thumb, for every 10 mph, thats the gear you should be in. for example 0-20 first, 20-30, second, 30-40 third, and so forth. i hope you can see what im trying to say. also it have an arrow pointing up in the gt500 gauge telling you to shift ideally for normal driving.

as for downshifting, the gt500 only goes to 6250 i believe, not 7000. they have a thing called rev limiter, holding it at 6250 max. so if you are in 4th at 5000, you dont need to downshift. if you are around 2000-3000 id shift down to 3rd or maybe 2nd depending how fast im going.

as for the uphill, sometime i balance the clutch and the gas to stay put when im on an steep incline. (i know some people here are against that technique). i use the emergency brake on a rare occasion but after doing it a few time, you shouldnt have any difficulty doing it.

downhill is easy, all you have to do is to ease off the clutch. you dont even need to press the gas pedal!

remember, practice, practice, practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,182 Posts
Just go practice where no one will see you.

My Gt500 is my first hyd. clutch Mustang I have ever owned out of about 12 cars and it is by far the easiest to drive of any I have owned
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top