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Discussion Starter #1
Been on watch all night for the last 12 hours lol so I thought id do some research on the Megs DA Microfiber kit that I have. I found out some pretty good information on autogeeks forum posted by one of the Meg reps.

Initially I was a little dissapointed in the system when I tried it on an area (roof) of my car with type 2 water spots. It didnt remove them completely. However Im starting to think that I didnt have my technique down 100% correct. I wasnt cleaning the pad properly or I guess as frequent as I shouldve and I deffinetely wasnt doing a 2'x2' area at a time.

I have had some pretty good results though on a few of my co workers vehicles so I think Im going to give it another shot and really focus on slowing down my passes and focus on correct pressure. I was going to swap to the trusty m105 and 205 but after reading what the Meg tech said I think Ill stick with this as he says D300 has as much cut as m105.

Here is what he said:
"The DMC5 disc with D300 will give you more cut than even M105 on a foam pad when working with a DA buffer, and this system usually really likes hard paint.

The DA Microfiber Correction System is a pretty highly engineered system, and we don't use that word "system" lightly. It was highly tuned to be used at 4800 opm on a DA buffer, with moderate to even heavy pressure (if need be) and with a liquid system that creates very little, if any, dust and is very easy to wipe off. The system has been hugely popular world wide, and for good reason - it offers tremendous cut without having to endure the long and steep learning curve of the rotary.

But, if you're very accustomed to using a DA with a foam pads you really need to alter your technique a bit here. First of all, priming of the pads is essential. You must get that light coating of D300 to permeate the microfiber ....... fibers. After that, throw out the notion of applying an "X" of product for each section pass; no more than 3 or 4 pea sized drops is all that you need add to a fully primed pad for every section pass. And we mean "pea sized" drops - we've seen guys lean more toward brussels sprouts sized drops so we wonder if they've ever bought produce before! If ever "less is more" held true, this is the place. And keep those sections down to no more than 2' x 2'. In fact, 18" by 18" is probably better, truth be told. Set the tool to speed 4 or whatever equates to 4800 opm for that particular tool, move the pad very slowly over the paint, and keep moderate yet constant pressure. With the very thin foam of the disc you're transmitting a lot of the tool's energy directly through it, so you can usually apply a lot of pressure and still maintain slight pad rotation. You don't need it spinning fast, but you do want some spin. But the pressure that you can now apply means that any tipping of the pad will stop the buffer from spinning, so a flat pad is even more critical now than at lower pressures with foam - you can stop that rotation easily by tipping on edge with heavy pressure.

When working with more traditional liquids and foam pads, if you find yourself needing more cut with what you have, what do you do? Increase the speed of the tool is everyone's first thought. With this system it's a bit different. If you find more cut is needed then do one or both of the following: slow down your arm speed, increase pressure.

Cleaning of these microfiber discs is critical, too. Microfiber is great at hanging on to stuff, and in this case that "stuff" is potentially dried product and that little bit of removed paint. You want that stuff out of there so that you're working clean as much as possible. To that end, we recommend that you clean the face of the pad with either compressed air (best) or a pad conditioning brush after every single section pass. Do NOT skip this. In fact, the fastest way to fail with this system is to skip cleaning the pad, over use product, or short cycle the product.

There is a fairly significant change in technique when you move from the cutting step to the finishing step, and we see a lot of people misstep here, too. They get so tuned in to the pressure and slow speed of the D300/DMC5 step that they can't move away from it, and they spend way more time than needed with the D301/DMF5 step. Here you don't need to worry so much about pad priming, and you can actually move very quickly over the paint with only light to moderate pressure. The tool should be turning at 3800 opm (speed 3 on our G110v2, double check on others) and you should be able to wax a full sized car or truck in record time. You do not need to work D301 as slowly and methodically as you do D300 - adapt to the product and process."

Also does anybody on here have some 50/50s from using this system? I found some on autogeek but I would like to see more. Thanks and I hope this brings some more light on this system to others as much as it did for me.
 

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yea the MF system can do ALOT of correction and it needs cleaned after EVERY section. BUT it does not play well with all paints. Compounding sure you can use on anything cause you will most likely follow up. But the finishing pad with their finishing wax doesnt work on soft paint especially black. I tried it on my mustang and it just left micromarring all over the paint. So it does fantastic work but it just does not work well with certain things. I think its hard to beat with the compounding with how much it can remove and how durable the pads are. Plus the system makes little to no dusting. I also think the Megs pads are better then the Optimum pads as well. I think they hold up better in the fibers and work on the paint nicer. My optimum pad after using it one time and cleaning it after each section with a pad brush it looked like it was a tattered mess and majority of the fibers were gone. The megs dont fall apart as easy. Optimum hyped these pads as they were sooo super durable and everything but I felt they are not at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah the megs pads are super durable. Im thinking if I refine my technique a little more Ill be able to get a really good correction on my car. I would like to get an air compressor to blow out the pads between panels. The main thing that surprised me is when I found out it had as much cut as m105. I just wasnt seeing It because i was making to fast of passes. Guess ill slow down a lot.
 

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yea the MF system can do ALOT of correction and it needs cleaned after EVERY section. BUT it does not play well with all paints. Compounding sure you can use on anything cause you will most likely follow up. But the finishing pad with their finishing wax doesnt work on soft paint especially black. I tried it on my mustang and it just left micromarring all over the paint. So it does fantastic work but it just does not work well with certain things. I think its hard to beat with the compounding with how much it can remove and how durable the pads are. Plus the system makes little to no dusting. I also think the Megs pads are better then the Optimum pads as well. I think they hold up better in the fibers and work on the paint nicer. My optimum pad after using it one time and cleaning it after each section with a pad brush it looked like it was a tattered mess and majority of the fibers were gone. The megs dont fall apart as easy. Optimum hyped these pads as they were sooo super durable and everything but I felt they are not at all.
Black is hard man, ive had to learn on black, but im glad though because ive had to really get the final polish down and learn how to get really good results on a paint that shows all.

Yeah the megs pads are super durable. Im thinking if I refine my technique a little more Ill be able to get a really good correction on my car. I would like to get an air compressor to blow out the pads between panels. The main thing that surprised me is when I found out it had as much cut as m105. I just wasnt seeing It because i was making to fast of passes. Guess ill slow down a lot.
Definitely slow WAY down on the cutting pass, and make sure you are applying pressure to the polisher into the paint, dont push super hard just a constant moderate pressure, this combined with a very slow arm speed will help a ton with cutting.

Ive never used the MF system but i know that technique is a HUGE factor with correcting with foam pad. When i first started correcting, i didnt get much cut out of 105, then i figured out that the right amount of pressure is key, enough pressure that the pad cuts, but little enough to keep the polisher spinning really well and take your time.

post of 50/50s once you get it back in swing man.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well here is a shot of my trunk and wing corrected from yesterday. Turned out pretty well







Only problem is these type 2 waterspots that Ive had over just the top portion of the car. I got them TONS beter and the actual water mark is removed, however its like it was corrosive and left like an indention in the paint. Does that make sense? Do you think I should keep compounding until its completely level or just leave it the way it is now? I was mostly worried about going through the clear. The last picture kind of captures what im talking about. They look like little specs in that picture towards the top portion of the trunk by where my garage light is lit.
 

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if its etched down that far. your not gonna be able to fix it with the buffer..most likely would need to be wet sanded and buffed out to remove all that.
 

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if its etched down that far. your not gonna be able to fix it with the buffer..most likely would need to be wet sanded and buffed out to remove all that.
Thats kind of what I was thinking. Thanks for confirming it. I guess ill just leave it like that for now. Still looks 100x better and there are zero swirls!
 

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Yeah it is but id be even happier if there was no etching from those waterspots. Its a damn shame that the previous owner didnt take better care of the paint. The wing used to look like somone took a scotch brite pad to it lol. I ended up having it repainted because it was so bad.
 

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if its etched down that far. your not gonna be able to fix it with the buffer..most likely would need to be wet sanded and buffed out to remove all that.
^^this

Yeah it is but id be even happier if there was no etching from those waterspots. Its a damn shame that the previous owner didnt take better care of the paint. The wing used to look like somone took a scotch brite pad to it lol. I ended up having it repainted because it was so bad.
You could try one thing, obviously wet sanding is a sure fix, but you could try M105 with a yellow BuffnShine pad, do the same section over a couple times with a good amount of pressure and see if it helps. It cant hurt to try, wet sanding is only gonna go deeper. lol

Most likely vader is right tho. I did some wet sanding on my trunk when i took the spoiler off to clean up between the bolt holes where the adhesive was, im pretty sure Ford put a pretty good amount of clean on there, i used 1000 or 1500 grit, followed by 105/205/85rd, worked like a charm.
 

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My only complaint about the MF kit is it finishes down like poopy
 
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