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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so i've heard that there is something with the modular engine family but i'm curious as to what it is. what makes a modular engine so different from any other engine?
 

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Over head cam located in the actual heads.... not like the pushrod motors where the cam is located in the center of the block... thats just the basic idea.
 

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The Modular engine is Ford Motor Company's current high volume overhead camshaft (OHC) V8 and V10 engine family. It gradually replaced the Windsor small-block and 385 big-block engines over several years in the mid-1990s. Contrary to popular belief, the Modular engine did not get its name from its design or sharing of certain parts among the engine family. Instead, the name was derived from a manufacturing plant protocol, "Modular", where the plant and its tooling could be changed out in a matter of hours to manufacture different versions of the engine family.[1] It is used in Ford trucks, (called Triton) in Lincolns (called Intech) and in Ford and Mercury cars.
The engines were first produced in Romeo, Michigan but additional capacity was added in Windsor, Ontario.

The first production Modular engine in the family was the 4.6 L (4603 cc, 281 in³) 2-valve SOHC V8 introduced in the 1991 Lincoln Town Car.
Over the years, the 4.6 has been offered in 2-valve SOHC, 3-valve SOHC, and 4-valve DOHC versions. It has also been produced with both iron and aluminum blocks. Bore and stroke are nearly square at 90.2 mm (3.552 in) and 90 mm (3.543 in) respectively. Deck heights for all 4.6 blocks are 227 mm (8.937 in). Connecting rod length is 150.7 mm (5.933 in) center to center giving the 4.6 L a 1.67:1 rod to stroke ratio.
Until 1999, all car engines were produced at the Romeo plant. In 1999 and 2000, Mustang engines were produced in Windsor. Production was moved back to Romeo in 2001. Most truck engines are from the Windsor plant, however there are many later model trucks with Romeo engines. All aluminum-blocked engines were produced at Romeo. In keeping with traditional Ford practice, as engine design is revised over time compatibility with previous versions is considered low priority,[2] so that parts from a modular engine made in one model year are not necessarily likely to fit an engine made in another; and parts from an engine manufactured in Romeo are unlikely to fit an engine made in Windsor.[3] The Romeo and Windsor plants have different designs for main bearings, heads (cam caps), camshaft gears (press-on vs. bolt on), valve covers (number of bolts), crankshaft (number of flywheel bolts), and cross bolt fasteners for main bearing caps.
The Modular DOHC was on the Ward's 10 Best Engines list for 1996, while the SOHC was on the list for 2005 and again for 2006.

Ford Modular engine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

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The Koenigsegg CCR used a modified, Rotrex supercharged Ford Modular 4-valve DOHC 4.7L V8, which produced 806 hp (601 kW), to achieve a top speed of 241 mph (388 km/h). This certified top speed broke the McLaren F1's long standing world record for fastest production car. The accomplishment was recognized by Guinness World Records in 2005, who gave the Koenigsegg CCR the official title of World's Fastest Production Car. This engine is the basis for Koenigsegg's twin-supercharged flexible fuel V8 seen in the CCX. The Koenigsegg record was broken several months later by the Bugatti Veyron.



amazing what these mod motors can produce right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
wow 806 HP!! thanks guys, that was botherin me lol
 
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