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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello everyone im from texas and looking to hop into a stang.
any advice for a good first stang for a guy who STILL needs
to learn how to drive standard?? hahaha

im use to trucks as i currently drive a big ass 4x4 diesal engine chevy

but yea what would be a good car for a newbie but i can fix up and all that
thanks for any advice now and in the future
 

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Here you go.





All right.

I think the first thing to do is understand the basics of what is going on. I don't know if you know these basics, but I'll cover them anyway.

The engine and transmission are connected by the clutch. The clutch consists of a pressure plate, which is a device with springs in it, and the clutch disc which is made of a material similar to your brake pads.

The clutch disc rests against the flywheel, which is connected to the crankshaft. The pressure plate holds the disc against the flywheel using springs.

The clutch slides on to a splined shaft, called the input shaft, of the transmission. It can slide on these splines. When you step on the clutch, you are pulling the clutch disc away from the flywheel, disengaging the engine from the transmission, or, more specifically, the clutch disc from the flywheel.



The first thing to understand is that many people over complicate shifting. It's really pretty basic.

First of all, double clutching is a method utilized for transmissions without synchros, and is a method used for driving heavy trucks. There is no need for it in a passenger car.

Second. It goes without saying that using the clutch to hold the car on a hill is silly. You are wasting the clutch, and it's not a safe practice.

So. The first thing in actually driving away, is the launch, or taking off.

When someone is first learning how to drive a manual, they should practice in an empty parking lot.

Starting off in first, you should slowly let the clutch out while paying attention to where it first starts to drag the engine down. Note what point the pedal is at in it's upward travel at the point the clutch begins to drag on the engine, or, engage.

When you become familiarized with that point, you should know that this is also the point you should apply a little bit of throttle. This should be one smooth movement. Your leg starts to let the clutch pedal up, and, as it starts to engage, you are applying throttle at that point, while continuing to release the clutch in a smooth manner. You should be able to let the clutch pedal up relatively quickly, not fast, but smoothly, as you accelerate. Picture your leg going up and your foot going down at the same time in one smooth motion.

A similar method is used as you shift through the gears. When you are ready to shift to second, you begin to depress the clutch pedal, or disengage the clutch, as your hand moves the shifter out of first gear. When the clutch is fully disengaged, or the pedal is all the way down, the shifter should just be entering second gear. Just as you enter second, your left leg should be releasing the clutch, and your right foot should be rolling on to the throttle as the clutch engages. You will know where it engages by feel, and from your practice starting which caused you to memorize at which point in the pedal's travel your clutch begins to engage.

Also picture your arm and your clutch leg moving at the same time. As your leg is pressing the clutch pedal, your right arm is moving the shifter from 1st to 2nd gear. Obviously your clutch leg starts a bit before your arm movement, but once your clutch leg is moving, your arm should be moving the shifter.

The reason it's easier to get rolling in reverse is because reverse is a lower gear. The lower the gear the easier to get the car moving. The gear has a different number of teeth on it, as does each gear in the transmission.

Picture a bicycle. Same principle. Different amount of teeth = different ratios.

As for downshifting, don't be scared of rev matching. Like starting off and shifting, all it takes is practice.

If, for example, you want to downshift from 3rd to second at a given speed, what you should first do, is drive along in second at that speed, and pay attention to where the rpm is at that speed.

So, if we are now driving along at that speed in 3rd gear, we know that we must be at 'x' rpm to rev match the downshift to second gear.

So, to do the downshift, you step on the clutch as your arm pulls the shifter out of 3rd gear and into second gear. At the point where the clutch is fully disengaged, your right foot blips the throttle up to just above the rpm you know you need to be at for that speed in second gear, and just after blipping the throttle, your left leg lets the clutch out. Quickly, smoothly, but not suddenly. If you do it right, the car should not lurch at all. It takes practice, and paying attention to what rpm your engine is at at a particular speed and in a particular gear, so that you know what you have to rev it up to to perform a particular downshift at that speed.

When you practice, and pay attention, after a while, it will become so second nature. I've done it for so long, I can't even give you an example of exact rpm vs speed vs gear in my car. I just know it by listening.

The biggest key to practicing rev matching on your downshifts is to start by doing it at lower rpm. That way, when you **** it up until you get used to it, the car is not lurching,and you aren't hurting anything, and won't lose control. You can really **** **** up if you try it at to high a speed and too high an rpm.

And remember, pay attention. When you do it, as you let the clutch out, if the engine rpm jumps and/or the car lurches because you misjudged, simply step on the clutch quickly and try again.

That's the biggest thing. People over complicate it, and wind up actually not paying attention to the rpm, the speed, and what those two are at versus a given gear. Your left leg and your right foot control everything. By paying attention, your brain will memorize where to rev it up to on the downshift, and if you also listen, you should eventually be able to do it by ear.

One final word on hills. Obviously you understand that you don't use the clutch to hold the car. You use the brakes.

So, once you have learned at what point your clutch begins to engage, you simply keep your right foot on the brake, begin to let the clutch out, and just as it begins to engage you shift your right foot on to the gas pedal and roll on to the throttle.

Rolling is a key word. Practice controlling your ankle. Driving a big truck is good practice, because some of them ride so rough, that when you're a new driver, the bouncing truck will cause your right foot to bounce, making your shifting all herky-jerky. So when you are learning, you quickly learn to focus on forcing your right foot to roll on to the throttle. Even if you botch a shift, don't let your right foot jerk around. Always picture your foot rolling on to the throttle smoothly.

Just pay attention to your rpm, speed, and what the two are like in each gear, and remember. And listen to the engine as you do it.



Thus endeth today's lesson. Next time we'll cover power shifting. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wow thanks alot man.....haha i really need to try this out. and what would u say would be a good ride for me to get ahold of? because i do have a friend who has a really tight 86 5.0 standard but of course he wont let me get behind the wheel haha but he'll prbly be riding shotgun with me sooo yea whats a good year and all that
 

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Anytime dude.

A Fox is a good basic easy to work on platform to start with. It's quick when stock, but not brutally overwhelming power wise for you to handle as you learn how to control and operate a manual transmission.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
and whats a fox? sorry im gonna learn all my lingo on the fly ive got the want and passion but missing the knowledge part haha
 

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welcome. if i was you ide pikc up a simple lil npi gt. 96-98 they are cheap quick (not fast) and power is just a head swap away if you need more.
 

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welcome to MM bro i agree with zip get a foxbody they are not expensive and you can mod them up easily... i like the 93 GT's preferably they have a nice look to them and are easy to work on and fun to drive
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
i live near corpus small town. but yea my friend has a fox that was his dad's its in real good condition with some mods they through in themselves their own father-son project thing. but yea im looking around right now for a good deal on a stang seem to be a couple good ones in San Antonio i might check out next weekend
 

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:welcome to MM :)
 
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