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Pawsitively sexy
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Discussion Starter #1
I've definitely learned that getting a good picture is more important then anything you do in post processing, but I still want to strive to get better at it. Starting to see that when I first started jumping into photography and post editing, I was very heavy handed on the saturation to the point of looking cartoonish. I think I'm making strides and I'm looking for more advice and tips on how to up my game.

Example of early editing:



Re-visiting the photo the other day:

 

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For car photography, I keep the post processing simple. Typically I'll adjust the levels, increase sharpening, and retouch any imperfections in the image.

The second image definitely looks better.

The most important thing is to get your image as close as you can in camera. You've got your black car in the shade and the houses in the background are in the sun so if you expose for one, the other is gonna be either too bright or too dark. If you have a tripod you can take multiple exposures to get highlight, mid tones, and shadows with detail. Otherwise, I would create a separate layer mask for the car and foreground and bring the exposure up some and increase the warmth. Then bring down the exposure of the sky if you can.
 

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Pawsitively sexy
Joined
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10,564 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
For car photography, I keep the post processing simple. Typically I'll adjust the levels, increase sharpening, and retouch any imperfections in the image.

The second image definitely looks better.

The most important thing is to get your image as close as you can in camera. You've got your black car in the shade and the houses in the background are in the sun so if you expose for one, the other is gonna be either too bright or too dark. If you have a tripod you can take multiple exposures to get highlight, mid tones, and shadows with detail. Otherwise, I would create a separate layer mask for the car and foreground and bring the exposure up some and increase the warmth. Then bring down the exposure of the sky if you can.
I've never actually blended images with different exposures before. I'll have to get that down pat. Appreciate the advice, man.
 
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