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My 2009 Mustang GT has been stuttering during acceleration, popping a lot, and sometimes even sort of stutters when driving along. I've tried recently replaced the fuel injectors, could packs, and fuel filter. I also just replaced the spark plugs about a year and a half ago with iridium plugs. They were wither MSD or NGK i can't remember. Any suggestions on fixing this? She also recently threw the codes P0430 and P0420. I figured that was just because I have the catalytic converters removed. Any help that someone can offer would be great. My next idea was going to be to replace to spark plugs again in case it's one of them that went wrong.

Just to also point out, my mustang has the following modifications: Long tube headers with an off road x-pipe, SR 62 mm throttle body, airaid intake with insert removed,24LB fuel injectors, and a computer tune. It did not start having the problems around when any of these modifications were installed. Started doing it randomly.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
alright ill give that a whirl! it's a BAMA tune from american muscle. what are some throttle bodies that would work better?
 

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Insomniac
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Just for curiosity sake id pull the plugs and inspect the electrodes, i drove for 6 months on 7 cylinders replacing damn near everything except the spark plugs lol
 

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Why would Bama not turn off your rear O2's?

Anyways I would start with the simple things like cleaning your MAF, TB and changing your plugs. Do you have the stock charge motion plates? If so, pull the manifold and give those a good cleaning also. They can get pretty gunked up over time if you run the stock PCV system.
 

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Why would Bama not turn off your rear O2's?

Anyways I would start with the simple things like cleaning your MAF, TB and changing your plugs. Do you have the stock charge motion plates? If so, pull the manifold and give those a good cleaning also. They can get pretty gunked up over time if you run the stock PCV system.

My car has been running a little funny also, and never even considered cleaning the charge motion plates. Would you consider this regular maintenance that should be done? And how would you go about doing that?

OP, didn't mean to thread jack, thought you might find this useful also.


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My car has been running a little funny also, and never even considered cleaning the charge motion plates. Would you consider this regular maintenance that should be done? And how would you go about doing that?

OP, didn't mean to thread jack, thought you might find this useful also.


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With the amount of oil sucked back through by the factory PCV system, yes I would consider this routine maintenance. You will see how gummed up these things get when you pull the manifold.

You'll have to remove the manifold and pull the plates off the heads. Kinda a PIA but simple. If I remember correctly there are two manifold bolts that kind of hide from you if this is the first time pulling the manifold. I can't remember what els needs to be moved or removed to accomplish this as I haven't had the stock manifold on there in years. It may involve pulling fuel rails and moving some plumbing/wiring around. Can't visualize it it's been so long. Afterwards I would think about a catch can or breathers.
 

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With the amount of oil sucked back through by the factory PCV system, yes I would consider this routine maintenance. You will see how gummed up these things get when you pull the manifold.



You'll have to remove the manifold and pull the plates off the heads. Kinda a PIA but simple. If I remember correctly there are two manifold bolts that kind of hide from you if this is the first time pulling the manifold. I can't remember what els needs to be moved or removed to accomplish this as I haven't had the stock manifold on there in years. It may involve pulling fuel rails and moving some plumbing/wiring around. Can't visualize it it's been so long. Afterwards I would think about a catch can or breathers.

I've done a little bit of research on catch cans and breathers but don't really understand them. Can you explain? You have a way of simplifying things that I actually understand lol. Which is better? And where exactly do they go?


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Every motor has blow by. That is exhaust gas and/or air/fuel that gets by your piston rings. If your motor was sealed it would build pressure and blow out seals and such to escape and cause oil leaks. That is where your Positive Crankcase Ventilation or PCV system comes into play. The EPA doesn't like this stuff to just be let into the air polluting it.

The way it works on our cars is that there is a hose hooked up from your manifold so that it can suck this blow by back into the cylinders to get burned while under vacuum. That is the tube that runs from your drivers side cam cover into your manifold just past your TB. Now if you just had vacuum it would be just as bad as having pressure so air is let into the motor through the passenger side cam cover via a hose on your intake tube after the MAF sensor. The flow of this air through your motor draws with it all of the blow by keeping pressure down and removing it before it can contaminate and break down your engine oil.




Now in your drivers side cam cover there is a check valve so that it flow in one direction. The problem with this system is that it tends to draw a lot of oil mist and junk back through your motor. This, over time, can gunk up the back of the TB and coat the inside of your manifold, heads, and charge motion plates.

There are two solutions to this issue. One is to install an inline catch can on the drivers side which is basically just a baffle or screen to help catch this oil and crap and collect it in a container which must be emptied from time to time. This is the best method if you want to retain a PCV system.
Pros, it is the best way to keep pressure from building and your oil from getting contaminated with unburnt fuel and such.
Cons it will gunk up the inside of your motor and also lowers your effective octane rating of the fuel you are using. You also displace good air/fuel mixture with exhaust gases and such and you make slightly less power. Not a significant amount but the more fuel and air you can burn the better IMO

Solution 2 is to run breathers. This basically replaces both the inlet and outlet with little air filters that will allow any crankcase blow by and pressure to be vented straight into the atmoshpere.
Pros, won't gunk up your motor and will keep octane levels where they are. You should also be burning the optimal amount of a proper air/fuel mixture.
Cons, some people complain of oil dripping onto their cam covers. It also only relieves pressure so your oil will get contaminated quicker and be broken down quicker. Some people also complain about fumes or odors in the cabin due to the proximity of the cabin air filter/inlet.

I run breathers. Always have and always will. The things I do to negate the cons of running breathers are:
I change my oil more frequently. Every 3K miles or 6 mos. This keeps the oil fresh and don't have to worry about breaking down viscosity due to contamination.
People get oil dripping from the passenger side breather because once you open up the system to the atmosphere the only real vent is the passenger side because the check valve is in the drivers side cover, and without any vacuum it won't open up. I have removed the check valve and run a breather on my oil cap. This gives the motor 3 vents instead of one and I get no oil drippage because it's not all coming out one breather.
I don't worry about the fumes or smell. I actually like it along with my uncatted exhaust smell. Brings me back to the days of riding around in Dad's old Chevelle. But you can always run a tube to a remote breather location away from the cabin air filter.

You can see all three breathers in the pics below.





Plus they look cool.
 

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That makes a lot of sense. And I know with modifications, there are always pros and cons. I have a shaker hood, and I think breathers might get in the way, unfortunately. I don't care about fumes and all that jazz, as I have a car less x-pipe and I change my oil frequently anyways. That would probably be my best bet, but don't see it working with my shaker. I'd rather get rid of that thing to be honest.


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Resident Headbanger
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My car has been running a little funny also, and never even considered cleaning the charge motion plates.
Just delete the damn things altogether and get a custom CMCV delete tune. Honestly, you won't regret it one bit.
I'd also recommend deleting both PCV pipes and installing catch can breathers on both valve covers. I still have a breather alone on the driver's side valve cover but I installed a DIY catch can breather 3 months ago on the passenger side. These were the raw materials that I used:

1 x 220g baking soda tin
1 x Scotch Brite scouring pad placed inside tin
1 x 3/8" valve cover breather filter
2 x 3/8" barbed fittings epoxied to lid of tin
1 x 3/8" vacuum hose
2 x small hose clamps

 
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