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hey guys, I have a question about bleeding the air out of the rad. I am just finishing up my blower install:rolleyes: and was just wondering the best way to bleed it, the manual says to use the vacume method, (I have no idea what that is). All I ever did with any other car I owned was to warm it up until the thermostat opened and the air stoped bubbling out and it boiled over, is this fine for our cars? and if someone could enlighten me about the vacume method that would be great. thanks:)
 

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Call me captain insano, but I've never heard of having to bleed a cooling system. Since the system has an overflow, and is technically open to atmosphere, as the thermostat cycles open and closed, and the water pump circulates the coolant, any air bubbles will naturally work themselves out.

Is there something different once you bolt on an intercooler that I'm unaware of?
 

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The term radiator bleeding is mis-used in the auto industry. Sort of dragged over from the old home sealed water heater days.

when they say bleed it, it's not bleeding at all. Your burping. The proper way to burp it is to run the car capless just like you mentioned for 15 minutes to operating temp, then turn on the heat on high for 5 minutes, cap still removed. This cycles the entire system including the heater core.

Shut down the car, put cap back on, wipe up any residual.
 

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The term radiator bleeding is mis-used in the auto industry. Sort of dragged over from the old home sealed water heater days.

when they say bleed it, it's not bleeding at all. Your burping. The proper way to burp it is to run the car capless just like you mentioned for 15 minutes to operating temp, then turn on the heat on high for 5 minutes, cap still removed. This cycles the entire system including the heater core.

Shut down the car, put cap back on, wipe up any residual.
Bingo.

I have done this twice with two separate supercharger installations, and it worked great. System fully "burped" and no problems.

Make SURE your intercooler pump is primed...on my TVS car I can see the coolant circulating in the degas bottle when I pull the cap and turn the ignition key (but do not start the car)...that is the only tricky thing I know of to caution you about (assuming you are liquid intercooled). I used an aquarium siphon reversed to force coolant to my pump since gravity couldn't get my coolant over a hose-hump by my ABS box.
 

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Call me captain insano, but I've never heard of having to bleed a cooling system. Since the system has an overflow, and is technically open to atmosphere, as the thermostat cycles open and closed, and the water pump circulates the coolant, any air bubbles will naturally work themselves out.

Is there something different once you bolt on an intercooler that I'm unaware of?
Actually its not ( open to the atmosphere )... If it was you wouldnt build pressure in hoses. I assume you have sat there and squeezed your hose ( no **** ) to check for pressure before removing your radiator cap. This is why they recomend you remove the cap with caution to keep from melting your face off with hot coolant.

And... An innercooler runs on the intake piping and has nothing to do with coolant ( on an air to air system ). Now, a system like with the KBs is a little different ( this is a little out of my area of expertise as I never had a IC on my KB ), but it does run off coolant but has its own pump that is independant from the main cooling system for the car...

The term radiator bleeding is mis-used in the auto industry. Sort of dragged over from the old home sealed water heater days.

when they say bleed it, it's not bleeding at all. Your burping. The proper way to burp it is to run the car capless just like you mentioned for 15 minutes to operating temp, then turn on the heat on high for 5 minutes, cap still removed. This cycles the entire system including the heater core.

Shut down the car, put cap back on, wipe up any residual.
+1... Hit the nail on the head as usual...
 

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Actually its not ( open to the atmosphere )... If it was you wouldnt build pressure in hoses. I assume you have sat there and squeezed your hose ( no **** ) to check for pressure before removing your radiator cap. This is why they recomend you remove the cap with caution to keep from melting your face off with hot coolant.

And... An innercooler runs on the intake piping and has nothing to do with coolant ( on an air to air system ). Now, a system like with the KBs is a little different ( this is a little out of my area of expertise as I never had a IC on my KB ), but it does run off coolant but has its own pump that is independant from the main cooling system for the car...



+1... Hit the nail on the head as usual...

What I meant was that eventually as the water pump cycles any remaining air bubbles would work their way out that way.... although what Erin said about leaving the cap off for a minute as you let the engine run... my bad. I just assumed that was common knowledge when topping off or refilling after a flush.















squeeze my hose
 

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I smell.......a roushcharger in my neighborhood :) Tell me when you are ready Brian.
 

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I smell.......a roushcharger in my neighborhood :) Tell me when you are ready Brian.
M90?

Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

:D
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I smell.......a roushcharger in my neighborhood :) Tell me when you are ready Brian.
tonight I am going to get it on the go i guess and waste some tires:D. Thanks for the info guys, I always burp my cars that way but was confused about the vacume thing:rolleyes:
Oh ken by the way now you can start in second not third:p
 

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Ill be rollin tomorrow night thru saturday. Might hit the track on Friday night with the lightspeed guys if you are interested
 

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Call me captain insano, but I've never heard of having to bleed a cooling system. Since the system has an overflow, and is technically open to atmosphere, as the thermostat cycles open and closed, and the water pump circulates the coolant, any air bubbles will naturally work themselves out.

Is there something different once you bolt on an intercooler that I'm unaware of?
On standard style systems, like older cars, there is nothing to do other than what you said. Some modern systems require bleeding to remove all air pockets. This is usually systems where the radiator cap is lower than the higest point, or that have multiple complicated passages (like an LT1). These engines often have bleeder screws on the cooling system.

The system is not open to the atmosphere. The cap holds pressure, between 14-19 PSI usually, depending on the system. Coolant only goes into the overflow when the cap spring is pushed open to let coolant into the overflow tube. Our car does not have an overflow, it has a resevior and cap that is pressurized, rather than a cap on the radiator.

Usually, air bubbles CAN work themselves out on SIMPLE systems. But a lot of cars have areas that can trap air, like the header core, parts of the heads, steam pipes, etc. If air gets trapped, either it will cause a hot spot, or sometimes the thermostat won't open before the engine overheats.

A lot of modern systems also CANNOT be run to operating temp with the cap off. A lot of GMs are examples, as well as some Fords. This is because they run them so hot that without the pressure buildup from the cap, they would overheat. Pressure raises the boiling point of the water.

The term radiator bleeding is mis-used in the auto industry. Sort of dragged over from the old home sealed water heater days.

when they say bleed it, it's not bleeding at all. Your burping. The proper way to burp it is to run the car capless just like you mentioned for 15 minutes to operating temp, then turn on the heat on high for 5 minutes, cap still removed. This cycles the entire system including the heater core.

Shut down the car, put cap back on, wipe up any residual.
Erin, burbing and bleeding are two different procedures. What you said is burbing, but some engines have to be bled first. Let's use an LT1 as an example, it has two bleeder screws that need to be opened, then you fill the coolant and watch untill air stops comming out of them and solid coolant comes out (like brakes...), then close the bleeders and continue to "burb" it after that. Some cars won't even bleed without using a spill-free funnel to keep the coolant level real high.

But, I don't think our cars have any bleeders. never looked real close, I think it is a fairly simple system though.

What I meant was that eventually as the water pump cycles any remaining air bubbles would work their way out that way.... although what Erin said about leaving the cap off for a minute as you let the engine run... my bad. I just assumed that was common knowledge when topping off or refilling after a flush.





squeeze my hose
I guess I answered this above. One more thing though I dunno if I mentioned is that some cars it is VERY difficult to get the thermostat to open. I've had to raise the front end up like a wheelstanding competition to get some foreign cars to "burp" before.

OP: The vacume method uses a vacuum cooling system tool, I think they are called airvacs or something like that. It hooks to the radiator cap and pulls about 20 inches of vacuum on the system to "suck" air out. Then, you use that vacuum that is in the system to "suck" coolant in, filling any areas that would have air.

But, basically do what Erin said. Fill it up untill it stops bubbling and it's full. Start it and let it get hot with the heat on. Goose the throttle a couple times to create turbulence that helps dislodge trapped air. Then once the thermostat opens it will take more coolant. I then usually wait untill the fan comes on, then top it off, cap it, clean it and go for a drive. then top off as needed once you drive it.
 

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No, I actually like explaining stuff. I kinda want to be a teacher.
 

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OP: The vacume method uses a vacuum cooling system tool, I think they are called airvacs or something like that. It hooks to the radiator cap and pulls about 20 inches of vacuum on the system to "suck" air out. Then, you use that vacuum that is in the system to "suck" coolant in, filling any areas that would have air.

But, basically do what Erin said. Fill it up untill it stops bubbling and it's full. Start it and let it get hot with the heat on. Goose the throttle a couple times to create turbulence that helps dislodge trapped air. Then once the thermostat opens it will take more coolant. I then usually wait untill the fan comes on, then top it off, cap it, clean it and go for a drive. then top off as needed once you drive it.

The vacuum method work awesome. Some use it to remove the coolant as well as install it. You nailed it on the head Urban. You got some smarts kid!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ill be rollin tomorrow night thru saturday. Might hit the track on Friday night with the lightspeed guys if you are interested
Yeah let me if your going.
 

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Urban, I tried to rep you for such a killer post and it says I need to "spread it around" - I must have repped you recently. Anyway, awesome post.

:yes
 
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