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I Have A FLATULENT Butthole.
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I've got a few small rust spots on my car. One on the edge of the driver door and one on the top edge of the quarter driver rear quarter panel. I want to get them fixed before it gets worse. I'm not looking for a professional fix, because eventually i will have the whole car repainted. I've been reading up on it and it seems like the best way to do it is to tape off the area, wire brush all the rust off, then use some type of steel wool to sand it down to bare metal. The few write ups i have read didnt say anything about bondoing it, but i would assume this is where you would apply the bondo. After the bondo drys, sand it, prime it, and paint it. Of course you would have the sanding in between coats as well. What are you opinions on this? I really just want a temporary fix that won't be very noticeable unless you're up close, and I want to do it myself. What type of paint would you recommend? What kind of primer? Do you have a better method of fixing it? Any help you guys can give me is appreicated, I've never done any kind of body work other than try to pound out a dent on my old jeep. Thanks guys!
 

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I've done a few tiny tiny rust spots. One thing your forgetting is LACKER THINNER. You want to apply this after you sand but before you apply primer. The LT is going to allow the paint to stick better and have quality lasting affect.

If your in a tight corners or spots I wouldn't use sandpaper less than 2000 Grit.

I don't know how big of spots your talking about... depending upon primer can be used or it doesn't have too.

As for paint itself, touch up paint OEM Motorcraft is #1.
 

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I Have A FLATULENT Butthole.
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Discussion Starter #3
I've done a few tiny tiny rust spots. One thing your forgetting is LACKER THINNER. You want to apply this after you sand but before you apply primer. The LT is going to allow the paint to stick better and have quality lasting affect.

If your in a tight corners or spots I wouldn't use sandpaper less than 2000 Grit.

I don't know how big of spots your talking about... depending upon primer can be used or it doesn't have too.

As for paint itself, touch up paint OEM Motorcraft is #1.
One spot is about and inch and a half long and 3/4 an inch wide. The other is about a dime size spot. I don't have a paint gun, but you can get automotive paint in an aerosol can can't you? I believe a guy at sherwin williams said that they can put it into an aerosol can for me if i brought them in the paint
 

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Get something to treat the rust, if not it will come back on you.. Get some 50 grit sand paper and take the area to bare metal, blow it off and treat the rust. The treatment should turn it black.. Then sand it with 80 grit.. Blow it back off.. mix your filler, dont put to much hardner in it or it will harden up before you can apply it.. also not enough it will take forever to harden.. Kinda in between .. Spread your filler over the area.. everything has to be roughed up with atleast 80 grit for bondo to stick.. Spread your filler over the spot your repairing.. Nice smooth swipes.. Let it get hard then sand it with 80 grit.. Dont use your hand !!! USE A SANDING BLOCK or a piece of wood.. Your hand is not flat... It will take a couple of times with applying the filler to get it right.. Get sandable primer .. THE filling kind.. Blow off your body work before you apply more bondo.. Exposes the pin holes... When your happy with the body work mask off the area you want to prime over.. Tape and Newpaper with be fine .. White 3m tape not the blue ****.. make sure the area your priming is sanded down , no glossy spots... sand the area your priming with 400 grit.. After you have that done sand your body work with 180 and 240 and 400 grit.. With the block... Put one coat of grey primer on let it dry.. Grey primer tend to hide imperfects on a car..sand it with 400 grit.. Blow the area off ..NOT WITH YOUR MOUTH.. compressed air.. or if you have a small compressor with a blower nozzel.. Check to see if there are any pin holes.. If there are get some glazing putty.. Use a razor blade and swipe it over the pin holes.. Then sand again with 400 grit.. When there all gone ,Blow off the area and re-prime it.. If you want to know if your body work is nice and flat use a guide coat.. This is done by spritzing black paint over your body work.. Basically If your high in a spot the black paint with come off first.. if your low you will see it.. If it comes off in a few swipes with sand paper your perfect.. If your high means your body work has to much filler or low not enough filler.. Get it.. After you have your body work correct apply two more coats of primer.. You will have to do this every so often because the sun and elements will bake it right off over time.. Perform all the steps above on all the other spots....

Good luck
 

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US Air Force (retired)
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There are two types of rust: that which is on the outside and that which comes from the inside out. You can treat and paint over the first type. If it is rust that bubbles out from the inside then there is really only one options. You have to cut it out and replace the entire section.
 

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If it's small surface rust, all you need to do is sand it to bare metal and paint over it. No bondo unless there's a dent.
 

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One spot is about and inch and a half long and 3/4 an inch wide. The other is about a dime size spot. I don't have a paint gun, but you can get automotive paint in an aerosol can can't you? I believe a guy at sherwin williams said that they can put it into an aerosol can for me if i brought them in the paint
I'd still get some auto lacker thinner. And yes you can get it aerosol, yet Im picky and I wouldn't buy car paint from a non car place. Otherwise what others said as well are spot on :)

G/L
 

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I work at a body shop; Do not use steel wool or any sand paper less then 320 grit. It's gonna leave scratches in the metal that will cost you more when you do decide to get it painted. You don't need to go to bare metal either, just sand the rust off completely with 320 grit and buy a can of primer since it's just small spots. Put three coats on and you should be fine.

It's not gonna look great or anything, but you'll be rust free. Also make sure you don't leave bare metal exposed for to long. Make sure you have the primer when you're sanding.
 

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You don't need to go to bare metal either, just sand the rust off completely with 320 grit
I'm a little confused by your statement. How would you sand the rust off completely but NOT go to bare metal? To my limited knowledge, if you're not to bare metal then you're not through the rust. :confused:
 

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King Trashmouth
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As someone who's worked body here's my opinion-

You've got quite a few options, both mechanical and chemical.

Mechanical-
Basically sand/grind the rust off. You can use grits coarser than 320, but remember, it will leave grooves. You'll have to sand it a few times with a finer grit, and make sure you block your primer well.

Chemical-
Get some high quality rust remover. None of that wussy stuff, you want the stuff that could probably kill you. I found the Rustoleum rust remover pretty disappointing. I've heard good reviews of POR-15 and Naval Jelly. Take the paint off, have at it. Make sure to neutralize the remover and then wash the affected area extremely well afterwards.

Or if the rust looks like this:

**** it (not literally. Well, unless you're really into that thing, just make sure your tetanus shot is up to date). Get a grinder, cut that cancer out, and you're better off just welding in a new piece.

Now you've got the rust off.

Though not necessary if you did a good job getting all the rust off, and I mean all of it, this stuff can come back to haunt you, I would suggest using an etching primer. Basically this is primer that has a little bit of an acid in it that etches the metal creating a better bond to prevent rust. You also don't need body filler if it's only minor pitting, trust me, I learned this. Just use a good filler primer. Slick sand is pretty nice. I also didn't mind Rustoleum filler primer for spot applications, it sands very well. If the pitting is too deep, use a lightweight filler, not your run of the mill Bondo. You'll thank me later. Once that primer is down, go to town blocksanding like you would on any other car.

Hope that helps.
 

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King Trashmouth
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We use a product at the shop that we use after grinding to bare metal and apply before any primers/sealers. I cant for the life of me remember the name, something p 404
Is it an adhesion promoter?

I've personally never used one, everyone seems to think it's unnecessary, especially if in this case you use a self etching primer. I had one of the older guys tell me "you only need adhesion promoter if you half ass the metal prep, and use shitty primer."

But we know how opinions with body guys go. Ask 10 different skilled body guys how to do something and get 10 different answers.
 
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