Modded Mustang Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was talking to a buddy of mine about seafoam in the oil and he said that it would be best to change the oil two or three days after adding it. True? Thanks again.
 

·
MM's official Chevy guy
Joined
·
2,024 Posts
yes the exact amount of time varies depending on the person some say a cuple day some say 500miles
but yes u should change it shortly after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,138 Posts
agreed....all the gunk and crap seafoam releases you dont want circulating through your oil system still. A week is prolly plenty time then go synthetic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,522 Posts
300 miles and no more
id also recommend getting an oil flush so after you drop it, take the oil flush and flush out all the gunk.
dont go striaght synthetic either.
its risky
get a synthetic blend and then go to a synthetic
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
I used Seafoam in the oil for a few hundred miles to free sticking lifters. The engine is now apart for a rebuild ( not a result of the Seafoam I believe), and there was a very nasty material resembling asphalt in the bottom of the oil pan. This stuff dissolved in solvent and probably would have stayed there and done no harm to the engine. I presume this is the material the Seafoam removed from the engine.
 

·
MM's Resident Ricer
Joined
·
9,892 Posts
300 miles and no more
id also recommend getting an oil flush so after you drop it, take the oil flush and flush out all the gunk.
dont go striaght synthetic either.
its risky
get a synthetic blend and then go to a synthetic
its not risky to go synthetic, synthetic can in no way hurt an engine
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,919 Posts
yea i've always wondered why ppl say its risky to switch to synthetic :dunno
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
I used Seafoam in the oil for a few hundred miles to free sticking lifters. The engine is now apart for a rebuild ( not a result of the Seafoam I believe), and there was a very nasty material resembling asphalt in the bottom of the oil pan. This stuff dissolved in solvent and probably would have stayed there and done no harm to the engine. I presume this is the material the Seafoam removed from the engine.
I guess the point I was making is that there is a risk to using any kind of flushing material, since you may not get the slug totally out of the engine, just move it around and it could block something else, like an oil passageway.

So I would agree with the posts above that you should at least change the oil after using the flushing material.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,579 Posts
well... IMHO I would only go synthetic on a modded engine.. but on a normal one then nah..

and i would only go royal purple which i think its the only 1 that reduces friction to a level where you even get 1 h.p.

my uncle has a 92 240sx the car has never given any problems it always used castrol or pennzoil regular oil. Never any problems or sludge and the car still runs really good. so..? it doesnt have synthetic and still runs really really good it never seen seafoam or anything so why would he spent 20-30 bucks more for synthetic if he is happy with reg oil :p..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,138 Posts
synthetic oil is not meant specifically for modded cars. It is meant to reduce engine wear and make you engine perform better. Synthetic oil is good to use in a grocery getter if you want it to last a long time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
I guess the point I was making is that there is a risk to using any kind of flushing material, since you may not get the slug totally out of the engine, just move it around and it could block something else, like an oil passageway.

So I would agree with the posts above that you should at least change the oil after using the flushing material.
I meant to say sludge not slug, btw.

As to synthetic oil, I have always used conventional oil. The only negative I have heard about synthetic oil is that it shouldn't be used on a freshly rebuilt engine, since it may slow the ring seating. I'm not sure if that is true or not, but I would use conventional oil during the breakin period. After that synthetic might be better. Your call.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,579 Posts
I just wanted to make a point. My uncle 240sx is my age.. I bet half the miles it has now have been made by racing still the car has good power and only (engine) mods done to it are ignition system, K&n CAI and exhaust.

and the car isn't baby cared also. also my grandpa old really old Ford pick-up its like from the 60's? always using normal regular oil and still runs.. (damn i cant believe my dad sold it for a mere 5k. and it didnt even have rust i would have love to have a classic)

my dad uncle has a 80s or a 90 civic (idk too much about those year civic i know the car is older than me) he never use synthetic the car has never broken down and the oil it uses is the cheap Esso one or w.e the one of the gas station that has a tiger on front..

my aunt F150 is a 97 with more than 130k miles and only problem it had was a stucked spark plug if that counts.. always on regular oil and not prob..

so what? if my family has been always using regular oil and our cars never gave any problems then i will stick with normal oil...
 

·
MM's Resident Ricer
Joined
·
9,892 Posts
if you take care of a car oil base doesn't matter, synthetic is better because it will not change viscosity with temperature, thats about the only difference and it leaves less deposits in the engine since it isn't made from dead dinosaurs lol, but it is good to use conventional oil for the break in period just to help lubricate seals and such since it will soak into materials easier
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,283 Posts
yes the exact amount of time varies depending on the person some say a cuple day some say 500miles
but yes u should change it shortly after.
exactly...about 300-500 miles, you dont want all that gunk floating around
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top