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Discussion Starter #1
Ultimate goal of the car: Refinement/fun to drive DD (possible track/twisty use)

I posted before about what people thought about these, what their impressions were. I was told that they wouldn't make a huge difference, its the rag joints in the steering shaft that make a big difference. I still got them since taking the steering shaft out looks hard and there are other parts I need before that gets swapped:

Steering Rack Bushings, Solid, 1985-04 Mustang with stock k-member [MMST-7] : Maximum Motorsports, the Latemodel Mustang Performance Suspension Leader!

The included instructions are fairly easy to install, Took me about 1.5 hours, a beer and two cheeseburgers to finish in my brothers driveway. It would have gone quicker if I had my grinder (hacksaws suck). The hardest part of the install was getting the metal sleeves out of the K-member with pliers. Fortunately the gouged up ends from where I pulled them out got cut off so you don't have to worry about hurting them.

I didn't expect to feel much of a difference, but I wanted a more precise feel to the steering since the amount of flex gave me a "snap-steer" effect. What (I think) was happening was I was turning the wheel too far too quick because the feedback was delayed slightly. This can be dangerous in wet or slippery conditions or at high speeds and sharp turns, and the crummy tires I have only exasperated the situation.

I'd say these increased the feel and feedback of the steering and I would recommend them to someone with a daily driver, a spare $50 and a few hours. The change isn't dramatic and there was no vibration or noise increase that I can tell, but I do like how these feel. I have more confidence driving in all conditions. Pics of them installed:



 

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Very nice. I'm thinking about doing this to hopefully eliminate some of the creaks in my front end. Anything not included in the MM instructions that I should look out for?
 

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I made a set last Fall and have had similar experiences, a bit more responsive with no downside that I have found so far--however I had clamped the crap out of the rubber bushings just after I got the car in late 2006.
 

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KCCO
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I used polyurethane offset bushings to help with bumpsteer because my car is lowered with H&R SS springs and I have no alignment issues. Don't even need cc plates. Either is better than stock.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Very nice. I'm thinking about doing this to hopefully eliminate some of the creaks in my front end. Anything not included in the MM instructions that I should look out for?
You have to cut some metal (aluminum?) sleeves and yank them out of the K, but the kit comes with everything you'll need. Really straight forward, and it is an "improved" design that doesn't creak like an older design.

I used polyurethane offset bushings to help with bumpsteer because my car is lowered with H&R SS springs and I have no alignment issues. Don't even need cc plates. Either is better than stock.
Have you had this confirmed by an alignment shop? I'm curious because MM says on their site that a stock K-member doesn't need offset bushings. Now, I don't know how much their test car was lowered, thats just what they say. My springs are only cut 1/2 coil in the front (for now) and the car tracks fine.

quote off their website:

"Although sold by many as a supposed cure for bumpsteer, installing offset steering rack bushings on a stock K-member make an acceptable situation far worse than if you had done nothing at all. How do we know this? Because we did testing. We measured the bumpsteer, both with and without offset rack bushings. Our test results were first published in the July 1993 issue of Super Ford. Find more information about bumpsteer and available kits."

link: Steering Rack Bushing Tech : Maximum Motorsports, the Latemodel Mustang Performance Suspension Leader!
 

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KCCO
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No, I have not had his officially confirmed but I do know that I don't have any problems whatsoever associated with steering/bumpsteer, ect. It wouldn't really make sense that they would be worse. And idk if there's any difference but that said it was first published in 1993. That's almost 20 years ago. I don't think so many companies would continue selling offset bushings And advertising they work if they really didn't. Everything is all about advertising. Another example of MM saying something different than another company Is they say the longer the panhard rod, the better, while Griggs says that this is actually incorrect, because it lowers the roll center BELOW ideal. So take that for what's it's worth, but I have he offset bushings, SS springs like I said which is quite a bit of a drop, and I have no issues.
 

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You have to cut some metal (aluminum?) sleeves and yank them out of the K, but the kit comes with everything you'll need. Really straight forward, and it is an "improved" design that doesn't creak like an older design
Don't mean to pester you but what do you mean "cut and yank out" metal sleeves? Like you have to take out the sleeve for the bushing, and you can't do that without cutting it?

And I agree with you on the offset rack bushings, I've never been a fan.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
No problem, I was puzzled for a bit when I read the instructions. There is a sleeve that goes in between 2 different parts of the K-member. I wish I had pictures. The sleeve goes through the entire assembly, bushings and steering rack included, on the stock design and a bolt runs through the sleeve. You can see the end of the bolt in the pictures,

The new bushings have you cut off the sleeve that sticks out of the K-member (toward the front of the car) and goes through the steering rack, and the bolt goes directly through the new bushings. So, you have to yank the sleeves out of the K, then cut off the part that would be going through the steering rack. They say to mark the point where the sleeve comes out of the K with something, but I didn't do that, I just eye-balled where it was to cut them off and I was fine (I hope).

Hope this helps.
 

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Holy crap! Randomly found some pictures of what I'm babbling about!

here are the "sleeves":
http://www.paladinmicro.com/images/TSB05143-05Lg.jpg

Here is what it looks like with the bolt and sleeve sticking out of the steering rack:
http://www.paladinmicro.com/images/TSB05143-03Lg.jpg

And the whole write-up:
PaladinMicro
Turns out I should have read the write-up that CliffyK linked to haha.

Thanks to both brokenweasel and CliffyK for explaining everything.
 

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I used polyurethane offset bushings to help with bumpsteer because my car is lowered with H&R SS springs and I have no alignment issues. Don't even need cc plates. Either is better than stock.
Do you realize that typically you can't "feel" bumpsteer just driving on the streets? So your ass-o-meter is not an accurate device to determine whether you have bumpsteer or not. Bumpsteer must be measured using a bumpsteer gauge, and 99.9% of alignment shops don't even know what bumpsteer really is, and have no way of measuring or even telling you if you have it.

I would put money that you (along with 99% of Mustang owners) have bumpsteer to a certain extent. Even those with bumpsteer kits. I know I have some, and have even had my car on a bumpsteer gauge and adjusted out to negligible levels, but there is some still there, it's just the nature of the design. If you've never seen a performance shop get rid of bumpsteer in a Mustang, you'd be in for a surprise to see how long it actually takes to get it negligible. The only way to really get rid of it completely is to go the way of Jazzer.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Turns out I should have read the write-up that CliffyK linked to haha.

Thanks to both brokenweasel and CliffyK for explaining everything.
The best part about this thread is that I wasn't trying to be a dick, I totally didn't read cliffyk's link either, I found it through another thread! :eek:
 

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The best part about this thread is that I wasn't trying to be a dick, I totally didn't read cliffyk's link either, I found it through another thread! :eek:
NO!!!

It was good, and completely in synch with what I found when I made my aluminum bushings, after cutting the "tube brackets" and was still wanting more.

Fortunately I have the tools to make them:



Unfortunately, it cost $36 t0 buy 3 feet of 2-1/2" aluminum bar from which to make them--so here I sit with over 2 feet of left over bar stock...
 

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KCCO
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Do you realize that typically you can't "feel" bumpsteer just driving on the streets? So your ass-o-meter is not an accurate device to determine whether you have bumpsteer or not. Bumpsteer must be measured using a bumpsteer gauge, and 99.9% of alignment shops don't even know what bumpsteer really is, and have no way of measuring or even telling you if you have it.

I would put money that you (along with 99% of Mustang owners) have bumpsteer to a certain extent. Even those with bumpsteer kits. I know I have some, and have even had my car on a bumpsteer gauge and adjusted out to negligible levels, but there is some still there, it's just the nature of the design. If you've never seen a performance shop get rid of bumpsteer in a Mustang, you'd be in for a surprise to see how long it actually takes to get it negligible. The only way to really get rid of it completely is to go the way of Jazzer.
As in tubular K, A arms, and coilovers? Idk what he has up front.
 

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No, he has an SLA setup, I believe, which doesn't use the strut to control the suspension's movement.

 
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