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6 Cylinduh, Really Bruh?
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Discussion Starter #1
So lately under hard breaking my car pulls to the left leading me to believe I have a stuck caliper. I was going to replace both front calipers and was looking at stainless steel brake lines and it seems most places only sell kits for the front. My brakes are spongy plus the stock lines are 15+ years old now.

Is it really worth upgrading the rears to stainless or should I just go stock with them?

Thanks!
 

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Yes it is worth upgrading the SS lines will not swell like a rubber line which means instead of getting a line buldge under hard braking youll get constant pressure at the caliper.
 

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Nile P. Pezdel of Pez Dispenser Inc. CCA
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Let me know if you find a rear kit, looking to do the same. I only upgraded the fronts so far.
 

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SS lines are definitely nice and all, but you'll see a bigger difference by simply flushing the fluid. I changed the fluid in mine last year (for the first time in at least the 10 years that I've owned it), and the improvement was incredible.
 

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Stock replacement lines. You wont notice any difference under normal driving conditions. If you do excessive road course braking then get the SS. I think AM carries rears. Might be made by J&M.
 

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Unless you're doing any autocross or open track events, just get stock rubber lines if yours are brittle or you think they need to be replaced. You could get a caliper rebuild kit. Stock V6/GT calipers are probably pretty cheap though. To cure the spongy feeling you most likely just need to flush the fluid.
 

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I just used the maximum motorsports cobra rear kit on my Bullitt. There is an extra little bracket it comes with on the line, but it works.
 

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Nile P. Pezdel of Pez Dispenser Inc. CCA
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When i did the Mach1/Cobra front brake swap on my 99GT i bought replacement rear calipers and rear SS lines all around. when i get home i can give you a part # that i used for my rears.
Thanks!

---------- Post added at 12:44 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:39 PM ----------

SS lines are definitely nice and all, but you'll see a bigger difference by simply flushing the fluid. I changed the fluid in mine last year (for the first time in at least the 10 years that I've owned it), and the improvement was incredible.
When I got my front Brembos, they came with SS lines. I didn't have time to replace them, but did put the rotors/calipers on. So, for a week, I drove, all city, with the stock rubber which was still in good shape. Felt good, the brakes were pretty obviously much, much better than stock. When I replaced the lines with SS though, the pedal feel went from good to holy **** these are amazing. Pedal was nice and tight and held firm through the travel, none of the mushy 3 inches of travel before you feel the brakes bullshit like the stock brakes have. SS lines, in my humble opinion, are awesome and I've since put them on my W123 Mercedes as well, and had the same positive result.
 

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6 Cylinduh, Really Bruh?
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Discussion Starter #12
Since I drive the car so minimally, and it's street driven, and the cost difference is insane, I will probably stick with stock rubber.

I appreciate all the feedback!
 

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Nile P. Pezdel of Pez Dispenser Inc. CCA
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Love me a W123 by the way, one day i want a 220D with a 4 speed
Thanks for the part #s !

Just got the 300d repainted. I set up a "garage" for it on the site, actually.
 

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SS lines are definitely nice and all, but you'll see a bigger difference by simply flushing the fluid. I changed the fluid in mine last year (for the first time in at least the 10 years that I've owned it), and the improvement was incredible.
This. I don't get why people ignore it. It makes a world of difference. Properly flushing and bleeding is likely better maintenance than to put unnecessary replacement parts on.
 

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Most local hydraulic shops in your town can so custom brake lines. The last car i had them done on (96GT), i just took the original rubbee lines in and had them make up stainless ones. Cost about $125-150 for all of them. Replacement stock lines were about the same price
 

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6 Cylinduh, Really Bruh?
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Discussion Starter #16
This. I don't get why people ignore it. It makes a world of difference. Properly flushing and bleeding is likely better maintenance than to put unnecessary replacement parts on.
I should have elaborated I apologize. I'm always on the go and keep my posts short when on the phone.

I'm going to replace the front calipers and all 4 brake lines since the system will be open anyway. 15 year old car and they are so cheap why not. After I bleed it I'm going to get the fluid flushed. The PO service records show it was never done so that means 15 year old fluid. I'm usually good about flushing fluids. Brakes just slip my mind until I get some sort of reminder to do it

---------- Post added at 05:36 AM ---------- Previous post was at 05:33 AM ----------

Most local hydraulic shops in your town can so custom brake lines. The last car i had them done on (96GT), i just took the original rubbee lines in and had them make up stainless ones. Cost about $125-150 for all of them. Replacement stock lines were about the same price
Replacement stock lines run about 45 bucks shipped off rockauto for either Dorman or raybestos brand. Granted I'm still doing homework but that's a good price for a shop to make compared to what lmr and am is charging. EBay sells kits a bit cheaper for SS lines but not by much
 

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I should have elaborated I apologize. I'm always on the go and keep my posts short when on the phone.

I'm going to replace the front calipers and all 4 brake lines since the system will be open anyway. 15 year old car and they are so cheap why not. After I bleed it I'm going to get the fluid flushed. The PO service records show it was never done so that means 15 year old fluid. I'm usually good about flushing fluids. Brakes just slip my mind until I get some sort of reminder to do it

---------- Post added at 05:36 AM ---------- Previous post was at 05:33 AM ----------



Replacement stock lines run about 45 bucks shipped off rockauto for either Dorman or raybestos brand. Granted I'm still doing homework but that's a good price for a shop to make compared to what lmr and am is charging. EBay sells kits a bit cheaper for SS lines but not by much
Yea rock auto wasnt around when I did those.

I believe you can buy the parts and materials from jegs/summit to make your own as well.
 

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I should have elaborated I apologize. I'm always on the go and keep my posts short when on the phone.

I'm going to replace the front calipers and all 4 brake lines since the system will be open anyway. 15 year old car and they are so cheap why not. After I bleed it I'm going to get the fluid flushed. The PO service records show it was never done so that means 15 year old fluid. I'm usually good about flushing fluids. Brakes just slip my mind until I get some sort of reminder to do it
No worries, that was not directed at you. More of a general rant. If you do both, you should have a nice improvement in braking.
 

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When I got my front Brembos, they came with SS lines. I didn't have time to replace them, but did put the rotors/calipers on. So, for a week, I drove, all city, with the stock rubber which was still in good shape. Felt good, the brakes were pretty obviously much, much better than stock. When I replaced the lines with SS though, the pedal feel went from good to holy **** these are amazing. Pedal was nice and tight and held firm through the travel, none of the mushy 3 inches of travel before you feel the brakes bullshit like the stock brakes have. SS lines, in my humble opinion, are awesome and I've since put them on my W123 Mercedes as well, and had the same positive result.
Don't get me wrong, SS lines are absolutely an improvement. I've got several close family members with Cobras, Mach 1s, and Bullitts, so I'm well aware of how nice their brakes feel.

All I was saying was that you will notice a larger difference by flushing the fluid (and thus fully bleeding everything), than you will by putting SS lines on with old fluid. Doing both is, by far, the best solution for a really solid pedal feel, but one of those is virtually free, and the other costs quite a bit.

This. I don't get why people ignore it. It makes a world of difference. Properly flushing and bleeding is likely better maintenance than to put unnecessary replacement parts on.
Yup, 100% agreed. After I did it in my Mustang and saw the results, I immediately bled and flushed the fluid in my '01 Civic. Same thing there, too: HUGE improvement.

I'm usually good about flushing fluids. Brakes just slip my mind until I get some sort of reminder to do it
I think that's the case for just about everyone. Most people don't see it as a maintenance item (and technically it isn't), so they don't worry about it. But for $5 worth of new fluid and maybe an hour of time for such a huge improvement, I'd say it's something that needs to be done every couple of years for sure. At least every time you put new pads on it.
 
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