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2013 5.0
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Discussion Starter #22

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Hi I'm Sean
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On the attic ceiling insulation, what did you do for airflow between the insulation and roof?
That's a very good question although I don't recall him ripping into the attic just yet. From what I can tell I see a roof vent and an drain vent and no soffits so I'm curious if the roof is properly vented.

As a point of note I would add in Fire stops to the walls. I guess your building inspector calls them fire catches but for most places any wall over 8'1 is going to require them. That being said they are a great thing to have in your walls. The one on the floor is going to slow the amount of oxygen that the fire can grab but once it breaches that it has nothing to burn but the wall. Putting in 1 fire stop between studs is going to allow the fire to chew on something before it moves on and gives you time for the FD to get there.
 

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2013 5.0
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Discussion Starter #24
That's a very good question although I don't recall him ripping into the attic just yet. From what I can tell I see a roof vent and an drain vent and no soffits so I'm curious if the roof is properly vented.

As a point of note I would add in Fire stops to the walls. I guess your building inspector calls them fire catches but for most places any wall over 8'1 is going to require them. That being said they are a great thing to have in your walls. The one on the floor is going to slow the amount of oxygen that the fire can grab but once it breaches that it has nothing to burn but the wall. Putting in 1 fire stop between studs is going to allow the fire to chew on something before it moves on and gives you time for the FD to get there.
Yup, that's exactly the way it was described by the building inspector. I will be tearing into the attic probably in the summer.

I will go up and take a couple of close up pictures of the attic shortly to show you guys what it's looking like.
 

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These aren't my pictures because I had someone help me with this. But its to this effect. This is how it was explained to me but I will definitely verify and we shall see if the previous builder was being sheisty. I wouldn't be surprised though.




http://web.ornl.gov/sci/roofs+walls/insulation/fact sheets/attic floors.pdf
OK, I was just making sure that you looked into it and weren't just putting insulation to the bottom side of the roof and calling it good. I have a Cap Code style house so I also had to insulate between the roof trusses. I scabbed on some 2x4's to the 2x6 trusses and used insulation that's 5.5" thick and it leaves 1.5" of air gap.

A lot of people don't think about it but you need some sore of air gap between the insulation and roof. In the summer the sun will beat on the black shingles and they will absorb a lot of heat. If you have an air gap it will help pull some of that air up and out a vent. If there's no air gap there's a couple bad things that happen. One, all that heat now has to transfer through the insulation. Two, a lot of that heat stays in the shingles and shortens the life of them. If you have some bats between the insulation and roof, you should be good.
 

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2013 5.0
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Discussion Starter #26
Yup, totally understand. I do see everything here up to code so I would only hope that the Previous Owner was smart enough to do it, but as it warms up we'll sure find out.

Alas, here's are the pics of the attic.

Stairway up (Odd wall color choice)


Glare as **** from the window


This is a built in that's literally built into the wall and the back of it is the exterior wall I believe as it's a little cold to the touch... not sure if I should toss it due to inefficiency, or leave it due to creep factor. (I told my wife, the po probably kept limbs in jars in it.)


More stairs up


So here's the floor in a shitty spot but I wanted to highlight the quality of the floor. Then entire attic floor is this 6" wide 3/4" tung and groove. This **** would be ****ing insane expensive to put up there today. Again this IS the floor and sub floor. It's a shame it's in such bad shape, but when the previous owner pulled all the knob and tube, the only access to it was through the attic floor.




The next couple pictures will put in perspective the pitch and height of the ceiling here. It's actually illegal to build homes like this in this state now due to the fact that a lot of immigrants convert it to illegal bedrooms (without fireescapes).






This is the ceiling compared to me, I can't even reach the light beam on my flat feet. I'm 5'5'' so that may not be saying much but it's still walk up ready.





a Bit of a mess above the bathroom I'm remodeling, but no worries, it'll get taken care of.


Last but not least, the sloppy finishing work that they did just to make it a somewhat "decent" storage area.


Not sure why the sheetrock is actually inside out with the brown paper-side showing and grey side in.


Knob and tube replacement


Window Sill - Brand new windows, shitty install


Ceiling sheetrock, bowing out.




The only exposed part of the room


Shitty tape job


Heading back down through the blue stairwell
 

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2013 5.0
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Discussion Starter #28
So been a week since some updates... really just some painting with a little bit of plumbing that I will describe at the bottom

Touching up some spackling around the trim of the staircase and other locations






If you notice, in order to get a nice smooth finish, I pulled all of the quarter round in order to smooth out the walls.

Behind the radiator on the first floor in the foyer, the trim was pushing off the wall and crapola got stuck behind it. When I pulled it, the plaster wall behind the trim literally crumbled, so I patched it (sloppy job, but it'll be hidden behind the trim) and painted. Note: I pulled the radiator, I will show how later.







Here's a sneak preview of it completely done


Upstairs done painted






Ok, so as far as removing the old steam radiators. You NEED this wrench, I just call it a pipe wrench, but there is actually a different name for it I think.



Anyway, nut (or whatever) screws on the valve, so in the picture above, think of the way to turn it (lefty loosy righty tighty) as it you were staring head on at the valve. Too loosen above, you would attach the wrench as it is above and lift up. To tighten, you would push down. As below


Keep in mind, depending on how old the house is, and if the valves have been replaced or not, you may be in for the torquing of your life. I knew they had been removed somewhat in the last 20 years, because the floors are decently redone with at least one layer of sanding done and it was done under the radiators leading me to believe the seal had been broken at least once before.

Radiator in foyer


Here is the valve probably new, from the foyer radiator.


Radiator removed from the wall so I could repair it.



Last but not least, the finish molding that goes around the top of the trim on the bottom of all of the walls.
Literally 1 single wall in the house has the original (on the left in the picture below) and the rest was replaced with this inverted quarter round (forgot the name, but in the picture on the right.) I will be replacing it all with the original, which I know for a fact is going to run me a pretty penny ($1.63 per foot) but I'm willing to pay the extra to bring the house back to the original as close as possible.



Still debating whether to replace this 1.5' of the original so it all matches or preserving this last of it for the house itself and being able to tell the story... not sure what I want to do.
 

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2013 5.0
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2,983 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
LOL

Hope that Facebook post was worth it.
Haha, it certainly got the rise I was going for. I had my car before I bought this house and anyone who knows me or was looking through my profile could've figured that out.

In the end though, I was looking for a reaction, and I got it so mission successful.



Nice work man. I have renovated pretty much every room in my house over the years. I enjoy doing that stuff.
I'm just tired of it now. Biting off an entire floor was certainly more than I could chew and it is taking its toll on me mentally. I'm starting to dislike going to the second floor. Especially because each time I try to finish something, I notice something else and another project starts anew.

So, unfortunately, I didn't get any pictures of the wood trim pre-sanded but use this door as an example.


I'm 100% convinced, that they simply put a stain/sealer combo, on top of some bullshit sand job they someone with no experience did.

Closeup of the "grain" (correction from my previous post in which I said, 'sand with the grit')



Here are some random shots post sanding


I'm telling you, compare this to the door picture above


Jacked up closet which needs work.


Here are some post staining and post sealing pictures of the rooms that we've started.






You can also see, I used white caulk to create nice seamed edges where the wood trim meets the wall.















Once the project is done, I will take some legitimate pictures with my wife's DSLR.
 

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Great progress looking good. giving motivation to do some renovating of my house aswell. Keep it up!
 

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2013 5.0
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Discussion Starter #35
Man, been a wicked crazy long time since an update but it's been well worth waiting.

Floors upstairs were completely re-sanded and polyurethaned. We decided to go with the natural finish and not add any sort of stain to the floor to keep it the natural look.

On another note, as I've been in other people's homes, I've started to pay attention to the small details. It's really the details that can make or break any project. A home, a car, a garden, doesn't really matter what it is, the details and fine edges are what will make it stand out from the rest. So, with that being said, one thing I always notice is when trim work is not one solid piece across a wall. When the people used the leftovers to finish a wall, etc.

When I decided to buy the base cap molding, I opted to get 16' pieces since the walls were all 13' in length. Wasn't easy getting them home in a pickup with an 8' bed but my wife and I did it. Also, because they were 16' long, only way to get them in the house was via the 2nd floor windows.

Without further adieu (sp?)



Also, the base cap that we bought was too small for the original 1/2" deep trim at only 1/4" deep. So we decided to use the base cap for the bottom instead of 1/4" round. Instead of base cap we got a really inexpensive crown molding for the base cap. I have to say, since the sanders got really close to the trim work, the effect is amazing.

Pardon the shitty android pics, I will get some better ones tomorrow when it's light out.




I even did every little piece in the closet












Also, for anyone who wants to try molding or crown molding... It's really REALLY easy. Literally buy yourself 1 extra 10' piece (@3$/ft which would be pretty expensive, it's still only $30) and practice your cuts/angles with the miter saw. Doing any sort of work on my car is 1000x harder than doing all those cuts. It probably took about 3 hrs to bang out the entire 2nd floor (with my construction partner/wife).
 
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