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New to Mustangs and I'm helping a friend with some projects on is S197. I've been looking at the rear lower control arms and panhard rods that are out in the aftermarket. I notice that many of the retailers out there offer both Street, with a rod end on one side and a conventional bushing on the other side, and Race, with rod ends on both sides.

What's the reason for the two? Would the Race style with two rod ends be unsuitable or dangerous for the street?

I have a 93 Corvette that I converted to a rod end suspension a number of years ago and it drives quite well on the street. Now I realize that the fact it has a multi-link IRS makes it quite a different animal but despite my looking I haven't found any info on why to choose rod end & bushing over rod end & rod end.

Thoughts?

TIA,
Tom
 

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ExPeNsIvE HoBbY
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New to Mustangs and I'm helping a friend with some projects on is S197. I've been looking at the rear lower control arms and panhard rods that are out in the aftermarket. I notice that many of the retailers out there offer both Street, with a rod end on one side and a conventional bushing on the other side, and Race, with rod ends on both sides.

What's the reason for the two? Would the Race style with two rod ends be unsuitable or dangerous for the street?

I have a 93 Corvette that I converted to a rod end suspension a number of years ago and it drives quite well on the street. Now I realize that the fact it has a multi-link IRS makes it quite a different animal but despite my looking I haven't found any info on why to choose rod end & bushing over rod end & rod end.

Thoughts?

TIA,
Tom
Welcome to MM!

I would imagine its to eliminate some NVH issues(Noise Vibration, Harshness).

Other than that, I can't see any safety issues coming from it. May e some binding if the system isn't set up right, which could lead to snap over-steer. In that respect the bushing will have a little give.

Also, it is recommended that the torque boxes be re-enforced if doing any mods out back, or putting down any real power...

Hope this helps.


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At the Apex pulling 1.28g
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New to Mustangs and I'm helping a friend with some projects on is S197. I've been looking at the rear lower control arms and panhard rods that are out in the aftermarket. I notice that many of the retailers out there offer both Street, with a rod end on one side and a conventional bushing on the other side, and Race, with rod ends on both sides.

What's the reason for the two? Would the Race style with two rod ends be unsuitable or dangerous for the street?

I have a 93 Corvette that I converted to a rod end suspension a number of years ago and it drives quite well on the street. Now I realize that the fact it has a multi-link IRS makes it quite a different animal but despite my looking I haven't found any info on why to choose rod end & bushing over rod end & rod end.

Thoughts?

TIA,
Tom
It has a lot to do with NVH issues. Poly on the chassis side helps reduce all the noise rod ended suspension components make. With a live axle, a solid poly/solid poly set up is asking for suspension bind. A multipiece poly bushing at both ends is a decent street compromise for a strip/street car. For any form of handling you would be better off with one end that can articulate. That is especially true in the LCA's over the UCA but doing so with both is a better idea.

The PHB operates primarily in the vertical direction, there is a little rotation and fore/aft movement but not nearly as much rotation and fore/aft movement as the LCA's will see. With the PHB you can use poly/poly without issue but the control arms it is probably best to have one end that can freely rotate. If you don't mind the noise (and there will be A LOT of it) then rod end/rod end will provide the least deflection and most articulation but in a live axle car that will make A LOT of noise. Not to mention rod ends wear out much quicker than poly bushings do in a street driven application.
 
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