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1. Are all subframe connectors the same? or are the cheaper ones garbage?
2. 50resto.com has a Eibach suspension kit for $834.99 it comes with (shocks, struts, anti sway bars and springs. Has anyone bought this? is this a good kit or should i look else where n different brand?
3. Besides all that and a strut tower bar would i need anything else to improve the handling on my car? (no roll cage i got a t-top:D) mostly street.
My baby is a 86 5.0 gt with t-tops.
 

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I know the cheaper subframe con. are not as good as full length. I can't say they are garbage since i have never seen any of them. If i was you I would go for some Maxium Motorsports Full Length Conn. I have a set i am getting ready to put in soon awesome pieces tho. I don't know bout the the full Eibach kit. I just put a set of the Eibach pro springs on my car and i have to say they look good and it handles better. I put a set of KYB adjustable shocks and struts some Maxium Motor Lower Control Arms on it too. I was gonna look into the Eibach sway bars next. If ya are willing to drop the $840 bucks i am sure ya won't look back it will make the old fox ride nice. Just make sure ya get some new poly isolators when ya do your springs.
 

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SFC's are no where near all the same.
Max. Motorsports and Steeda are both very good. They both have additional cross bracing the welds/bolts to the seat bolts. Also makes your front seats stronger, in case of an accident, they are bolted to the sfc's, and not just the flimsy floor pan.
They are also much thicker/wider.

Dont know about the eibach kit, but generally speaking, Eibach makes quality products, and, makes springs for about 80% of all the other companies out there.

I had an 86 T top back in.. well... 86 :)

Loved that car. Check it out! Man, I wish I kept that car!

 

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I believe the main difference between the el cheapo sub frame connectors and the more expensive ones are the fit.. I know the steeda and maximum motorsports ones i've used in the past have fit perfect while the bbk and summit ones i've used recently required a good bit of jerking with and messaging to get to fit correctly which resulted in a more expensive installation but once installed a subframe is a subframe. Of course a full length will be better then a standard length and a through the floor would be better then a full length but really any subframe is better then no subframe at all so I say you can't go wrong with what you choose just put something on the car or make your own like some people dlo that have access to the materials and welding equipment.

Eibach is a good company and make good products but im not familiar with that kit so I can'jt help there and I never liked going with the poly spring isolators myself over stock replacement ones because they raise the ride height slightly
 

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Ya I agree with ya Ryan on the poly isolators raisin the height up a lil. I wasn't to worried bout the hieght i just wanted it to be a lil bit lower. I have to say it makes the car handle a lot better tho. Have any of you guys changed sway bars? I was wondering if they would make a big difference or not?
 

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How well do you want your car to handle? I mean you can jus tdo basic stuff, or you can really do some work with a Griggs setup, or coil overs all way around. I think you need to evaluate your goals for the car. Personally I have never used any Eibach products, I know they have a good name, but their kits were never tailored to my needs. Not to mention that I would rather mix and match to get the best part for my specific need than to buy an alll in one kit.

Personally I think you can't go wrong with anything from Team Z Motorsports, Maximum Motorsports, or Steeda. UPR even makes some good suspension components.

Answer these questions, and we'll better be able to help steer you in the right direction. How much do you want to lower the car?
Are you looking for better straightline performance, or cornering ability?
What is your actual budget for suspension?
 

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If you want some budget sfc, just get some decent size channel rail and a welder. You can even get fancy with it and get some tubular steel and make some bracing from the sfc to the pinch weld. adds some weight but well worth it for the price and rigidity.
 

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Kmedeiros88, are you seriously suggesting that he go weld some channel in there? I hope you are joking, Do you seriosuly think that you can make a comparable product that engineers have designed without at least having their product in your hands to study first.

I am all for doing my fabrication. Take one look at my Jeep and you will see a bunch of high quality products that I myself have created, but nnot without doing research, and taking ideas and concepts from already built products. Your advice is about ignorant as giving scissors to a child and racing them down a stair case...
 

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Hell no, I'm not joking. I literally have a piece of channel welded on each side that ties the frame together to keep her straight. And believe me, i have beat the piss out of my car and it hasnt broke. My car is also pretty much stock, so I don't need more than that. If he doesn't have the know how, then he shouldnt attempt it right? I've had absolutely no problems in the 4 years I've owned the car. And for $20 you can't beat it. What's wrong with that idea? Seriously, what's it going to hurt? The frame? You yourself have done it. What engineering is involved in that? Isn't the point of sfc to tie the frame together? Now if you are building a race car, then yeah, I would agree with you.
 

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Plenty of guys have made their own subframe connectors. There's a few good write-ups on how to do it floating around. You need to take lots of measurements, use box steel, and make cuts/welds to angle it slightly. A straight shot won't quite work. Do it out of the right size/thickness box and get the angles right and it'll be no different than something you buy from the aftermarket, except cheaper.

OP, whatever route you go with, don't get anything but the thru-floor weld in ones if you want them to be strong. Bolt in ones are useless.
 

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I agree with fogged306. Better than my idea, even though it works for me. Like I said $20, two hours, and four years later with no problems.
 

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****, anyone can MIG weld. If you've got someone who will let you use their MIG, you can learn how and weld in your subframes in the same day. I never welded before and after practicing on a couple plates, welded **** together on my truck the first day I learned how to weld... Stick and TIG are another story and flux core "MIG" without the gas sucks if you don't know what you're doing, but if it's solid core gas shielded MIG, it's about as easy as drawing lines with a pencil once you get the hang of it and adjust it for the thickness of the metal you're using.
 

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Hell no, I'm not joking. I literally have a piece of channel welded on each side that ties the frame together to keep her straight. And believe me, i have beat the piss out of my car and it hasnt broke. My car is also pretty much stock, so I don't need more than that. If he doesn't have the know how, then he shouldnt attempt it right? I've had absolutely no problems in the 4 years I've owned the car. And for $20 you can't beat it. What's wrong with that idea? Seriously, what's it going to hurt? The frame? You yourself have done it. What engineering is involved in that? Isn't the point of sfc to tie the frame together? Now if you are building a race car, then yeah, I would agree with you.
Your first intiial post doesn not remotely represent this. Now like I said before, I am all for fabricating stuff myself. I have done several certified cages, among off road bumpers, to fenders, to building heavy equipment and agriculture pieces. My fab skills are quite a bit better than average. It may be easy for someone who has the necessary tools, and skill. Then again anyone with both probably would have already done this, and wouldn't be making a thread about it...

Plenty of guys have made their own subframe connectors. There's a few good write-ups on how to do it floating around. You need to take lots of measurements, use box steel, and make cuts/welds to angle it slightly. A straight shot won't quite work. Do it out of the right size/thickness box and get the angles right and it'll be no different than something you buy from the aftermarket, except cheaper.

OP, whatever route you go with, don't get anything but the thru-floor weld in ones if you want them to be strong. Bolt in ones are useless.
I agree, also something that should've been mentioned by Kmedeiros88..

I agree with fogged306. Better than my idea, even though it works for me. Like I said $20, two hours, and four years later with no problems.
I think the easiest way is to borrow a set from someone, or buy a set and use them as a template. Then you can return them after fabbing your own. I have done this several time for my Jeep.
 

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****, anyone can MIG weld. If you've got someone who will let you use their MIG, you can learn how and weld in your subframes in the same day. I never welded before and after practicing on a couple plates, welded **** together on my truck the first day I learned how to weld... Stick and TIG are another story and flux core "MIG" without the gas sucks if you don't know what you're doing, but if it's solid core gas shielded MIG, it's about as easy as drawing lines with a pencil once you get the hang of it and adjust it for the thickness of the metal you're using.
I'm sure it isn't as easy for everyone to pick up. While I learned how to stick weld first, I can MIG, TIG, and I am certified for over heads, verticals, and I hold state inspection licenses for structural and gas main. I know a thing about it you could say...
 

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I'm borderline retarded. If I can pick up MIG welding that fast, anyone can. Especially if you're on thick **** like tying the frame together. The semi-rusted sheetmetal ****.. different story. I've got 6 months of stick/pipe classes and 6 months of MIG classes myself and am going back for a TIG program in the fall. No certificates tho, I hate stick with a passion and will never do it as a job. Flux fumes suck after a while.
 

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Definately practice with some scrap steel first if you haven't welded before. Take fogged advise, he is spot on. Mach1Racer also has good ideas if you have the resources. I like that idea about buying stuff and returning it. Why didn't I think of that? Doh! I'm just a cheap sob. I didn't get as technical as fogged described but my sfc get the job done. If I ever decide to upgrade, its nothing that I can't remove and do it better or just buy some stuff from maximum motorsports. That grip in a box kit looks nasty at a hefty $4200 lol.
 

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I learned on heavy stuff, as I said farm equipment and heav equipment. I have built excavator buckets, welded in new floors in dump trucks, custom made tailgates etc.. I learned how to weld thin metal in high school while working at a body shop. Sheet metal is much more difficult because there is so much less room for error. For thick steel you just crank up the heat, and burn in to it.
 
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