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Discussion Starter #1
I have an 03 Mach 1 4v engine, im swapping the cams and didn't want to have to remove the timing cover an all the accessories i know Ford makes a timing chain wedge but i think its only for 3V motors, has anyone done a cam swap without pulling the timing cover on a 4V 4.6 or use some kind of makeshift tool i can put together much thanks
 

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a.k.a. Racecougar
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why do i have to pull the timing cover if it can be done on a 3v it must be possible on a 4v
Because you have an extra cam on each side. That wedge tool doesn't work that well anyway. Whether you're working on a 2V, 3V, or 4V, I'd pull the front cover and do it right.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Because you have an extra cam on each side. That wedge tool doesn't work that well anyway. Whether you're working on a 2V, 3V, or 4V, I'd pull the front cover and do it right.
how hard is it to get the timing cover and all the accessories off with the engine in the car
 

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Most of the accessories are easy to remove, just a matter of a few bolts. The power steering pump is a bit of a pain because one of the bolts is tucked in behind a hard line. You'll need to unbolt the A/C compressor from the bottom side of the car. The most difficult thing is probably getting the bolt out of the crank pulley. An impact gun makes short work of it but if you don't have that, you'll need to find a way to hold the engine still while you crank on the bolt with a breaker bar. You can leave the car in gear and have a helper sit in it and stand on the brakes, hopefully that'll hold it well enough. Once the bolt is out, you'll need to rent a puller tool to remove the pulley. When removing the timing cover bolts, don't forget to remove the four on the bottom that go through the front of the oil pan. Once all the bolts are out, the cover should pop loose with not much effort. If it doesn't seem to want to come loose, you probably missed a bolt. When you're done with the job and putting it all back together, you should use a new crank bolt and then you'll have the opposite problem you had at removal. You'll need to find a way to hold the engine still while you torque the bolt down. Also when you're putting things together you need to make sure you put some RTV sealant in strategic places to keep it from leaking oil. If you don't have one I'd recommend getting a shop or Haynes manual for guidance.
 

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You don't say what cams you're installing, if you're doing the earlier Cobra cams then you don't need to swap out the exhaust cams, only the intakes.

And another possibility instead of worrying about locking the cams would be to remove the cam followers instead. It's relatively easy to do with just a large flat screwdriver.
Just be sure to find a way to keep the followers in order so you can get them reinstalled in the same location from which they were removed. Once the followers are all removed, you can then rotate the engine to get all your timing marks aligned and you'd no longer have to worry about the valve spring tension causing the whole assembly to rotate on you.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Most of the accessories are easy to remove, just a matter of a few bolts. The power steering pump is a bit of a pain because one of the bolts is tucked in behind a hard line. You'll need to unbolt the A/C compressor from the bottom side of the car. The most difficult thing is probably getting the bolt out of the crank pulley. An impact gun makes short work of it but if you don't have that, you'll need to find a way to hold the engine still while you crank on the bolt with a breaker bar. You can leave the car in gear and have a helper sit in it and stand on the brakes, hopefully that'll hold it well enough. Once the bolt is out, you'll need to rent a puller tool to remove the pulley. When removing the timing cover bolts, don't forget to remove the four on the bottom that go through the front of the oil pan. Once all the bolts are out, the cover should pop loose with not much effort. If it doesn't seem to want to come loose, you probably missed a bolt. When you're done with the job and putting it all back together, you should use a new crank bolt and then you'll have the opposite problem you had at removal. You'll need to find a way to hold the engine still while you torque the bolt down. Also when you're putting things together you need to make sure you put some RTV sealant in strategic places to keep it from leaking oil. If you don't have one I'd recommend getting a shop or Haynes manual for guidance.
Shoulda done this when i had the motor out but it shouldnt be to bad and i got Comp cams, springs, and retainers
 

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I don't know if the 3v wedge works on the 4v but there is a wedge you can use on the 4 Valve. Justin at VMP did the swap in either 5.0 or MM&FFs article and it clearly show him using the wedge. He changed the springs and installed Comp cams I believe!
 

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If you're gonna go the the expense and trouble of swapping 4v cams, you should also take the time to degree them so you get the most hp possible. That my friend requires removing the front cover.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If you're gonna go the the expense and trouble of swapping 4v cams, you should also take the time to degree them so you get the most hp possible. That my friend requires removing the front cover.
Dont wanna but your right, it needs to be done correctly the first time to avoid issues later on thanks
 
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