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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all :D

Hope all is well, Ive been driving this beast for 2 weeks now. and its all cool and fun to feel that power.

however there is one tiny question i can't even find in the manual.

you see next to the speedometer actually bellow it. when ever im driving shifting my gears normally.

I get this forward yellow Arrow. i have no idea what does that mean.

Does it mean i should be in a hight gear ?

or is it asking me to speed up ? lol anybody knows ?
 

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you're not granny shifting and not double clutching like you should.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Shift light
you're not granny shifting and not double clutching like you should.
lol, ok could you please explain that as if you were explaining it to a 5 year old lol cauz i have no idea what your talking about


am i shifting too fast ? cauz i usually shift at 3000 rpm

am i not pressing the clutch hard enough ?

am i keeping the car in higher gears ?
 

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ignore it. If you are confident that you know how to drive a standard, don't let the ecm boss you around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ignore it. If you are confident that you know how to drive a standard, don't let the ecm boss you around.
Well ive drivven manual shift before, but not a sports car.

thats why i got a bit paranoid that i'm doing something wrong >.<
 

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you're ok.
My stang and my focus both did that. the damn focus told me to shift at like 2k when redline was all the way up at like 8k lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
wtf is double clutching, i have no idea what it means and ive heard the term everywhere?
Same here i have no idea whats that. but this damn forward arrow is bugging me i wanna know what is it :(
 

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It's in the details Mod!
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I am not familiar with the GT500, but I know in a lot of manual cars Ford put a shift light in them. That is what you are seeing. It is letting you know when to shift for optimal fuel mileage. Not shifting at thoes points will not hurt your car one bit as longs as you shift before redline. It will however hurt the normal persons wallet. However since you are in Saudia and have cheap gas, and we hate you for that, lol, you will be fine.
 

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It's in the details Mod!
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Double clutching.

For most manual transmission drivers, the act of shifting gears is a straightforward one. First the clutch is depressed, then the shifter is thrown into the next gear, and finally the clutch is released putting the car back into gear. All of this is usually done without thinking, at least after some practice.

But double clutching adds a third step into the mix. The shifter, rather than going straight to the next gear, makes a stop in neutral and then the clutch is released. This is to allow the engine to slow down (or with a tap on the gas, speed up when downshifting) so the transition into the next gear is much more smooth. The driver then depresses the clutch again and completes the shift into the target gear, and finally the clutch is released again, putting the car back into gear. It only takes a split second for the engine speed to match the speed of the gears, so the entire action is done very quickly as a fluid sequence of events.

Most modern cars, however, are equipped with devices called synchronizers that help to synchronize the speed of the gearbox with that of the engine. This effectively eliminates the need for double clutching. Some large trucks on the other hand have so many gears that synchronizers are inefficient, while race cars can squeeze out more power without them, making double clutching a fact of life.

There are times, however, that a normal car driver may want to make use of double clutching. Many manual transmission drivers realize the advantages of downshifting in slippery conditions. Rather than brake and skid, a car with a manual transmission can make use of the engine to slow down - thereby eliminating the possibility of a skid. But even with synchronizers, a driver trying to shift from fifth gear into second could have some trouble. In this case, double clutching by pausing in neutral and giving the engine a little gas to match speeds of the engine and gearbox, can allow such a drastic shift.


Some driving purists maintain that it's still the proper way to shift, and makes for a much smoother ride. It eliminates some of the jumpiness sometimes felt in a manual transmission car, and it decreases the stress on the gearbox. In any case, double clutching a skill worth having in emergency downshift situations, and not very difficult to learn.
 

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It's in the details Mod!
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Yes that was plage, playge, **** it, copied. from somewhere. I did not write that.
 

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Yeah, anyone that tells you to double-clutch upshift is an idiot.

I double-clutch downshift when I'm just cruising around as it does make for a smoother ride and is easier on the synchros (notoriously weak in the T45).
 

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It's in the details Mod!
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I just rev match on down shifts, I don't double clutch.
 

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Really? Wonder why?
 

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Really? Wonder why?
My understanding is that it's due to the fact that they're are three parts that you need to match speed: the input shaft, the output shaft, and the secondary shaft. Rev matching only affects the input and output shafts, but relies on the synchro to match the secondary shaft speed.
 

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It's in the details Mod!
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Damn. I was unaware of that. Learn something new everyday. Thanks. Reps.
 

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Double clutching.

For most manual transmission drivers, the act of shifting gears is a straightforward one. First the clutch is depressed, then the shifter is thrown into the next gear, and finally the clutch is released putting the car back into gear. All of this is usually done without thinking, at least after some practice.

But double clutching adds a third step into the mix. The shifter, rather than going straight to the next gear, makes a stop in neutral and then the clutch is released. This is to allow the engine to slow down (or with a tap on the gas, speed up when downshifting) so the transition into the next gear is much more smooth. The driver then depresses the clutch again and completes the shift into the target gear, and finally the clutch is released again, putting the car back into gear. It only takes a split second for the engine speed to match the speed of the gears, so the entire action is done very quickly as a fluid sequence of events.

Most modern cars, however, are equipped with devices called synchronizers that help to synchronize the speed of the gearbox with that of the engine. This effectively eliminates the need for double clutching. Some large trucks on the other hand have so many gears that synchronizers are inefficient, while race cars can squeeze out more power without them, making double clutching a fact of life.

There are times, however, that a normal car driver may want to make use of double clutching. Many manual transmission drivers realize the advantages of downshifting in slippery conditions. Rather than brake and skid, a car with a manual transmission can make use of the engine to slow down - thereby eliminating the possibility of a skid. But even with synchronizers, a driver trying to shift from fifth gear into second could have some trouble. In this case, double clutching by pausing in neutral and giving the engine a little gas to match speeds of the engine and gearbox, can allow such a drastic shift.


Some driving purists maintain that it's still the proper way to shift, and makes for a much smoother ride. It eliminates some of the jumpiness sometimes felt in a manual transmission car, and it decreases the stress on the gearbox. In any case, double clutching a skill worth having in emergency downshift situations, and not very difficult to learn.
thanks for that explanation....as stupid as it sounds to do that at all, at least i know what it is now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I am not familiar with the GT500, but I know in a lot of manual cars Ford put a shift light in them. That is what you are seeing. It is letting you know when to shift for optimal fuel mileage. Not shifting at thoes points will not hurt your car one bit as longs as you shift before redline. It will however hurt the normal persons wallet. However since you are in Saudia and have cheap gas, and we hate you for that, lol, you will be fine.
ROFL hahahahaha

ok as long as i'm ok then screw fuel lol :D

don't laugh at me but i just discovered that i can set the "SVT" light on my car to light and give a tone warning so i can shift :D i set it to 5000 rpm so i can drive normally with out any disturbance. and when iam racing or speeding the warning will work :D

Thanks "M.P. Cobra Fan" :D
 
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