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Wax on, Wax off
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tried searching, but the system gave me an error each time :dunno

Anyways, so I noitced today that after buffing the car the chips that were down to primer had some metal exsposed. Now, I am not going to get the whole body panel repainted for a chip or two. I decided I needed to get some quality touchup paint.

Now, I found this on ebay:

2003 2004 MUSTANG GT/V6 MACH 1 TORCH RED TOUCH-UP PAINT:eBay Motors (item 260520772665 end time Jan-08-10 01:09:52 PST)

Would this be sufficent? Would I also need a bottle of primer and clear?

Next question: What would be the best method to make this less noticeable? I would like it to blend as much as possible.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Rebel Of The Sacred Heart
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If The chip is down to the metal, you should put some primer on the bare metal first. The touch up paint you posted will work, but its lacquer paint. I just always prefer to touch up a chip with a urethane single stage. But the laquer would work. Urethane paints are just better. You could also get a fiberglass prep pen and scuff the chip up some before you apply your paint just to be sure it has a good bond.

When you put the paint on, make the paint dot a little higher than the surface of the clear. Then after its dried for a couple days, take some 2000 wet or dry sand paper and wet sand the little bump down, with a little sanding block, level with the paint surface, Any little flat thing will work as a block, i usually use a one inch peice of a mixing stick and wrap the paper around it.

Once you have it sanded back down level, buff it the sanded area back to a shine with some compound. And if the color matches, then youll never be able to notice it.


One way to make sure the color matches is to go to your local automotive paint supplier and have them use their magic eye on your car and have them custom mix some single stage for you. What the magic eye is, is a little box they put on your car and it reads the actual color on your car taking into account fading or anything else and makes a custom formula to match the the paint on that particular car.
 

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Wax on, Wax off
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I doubt my local body shop has that piece of equipment. The shop does decent work, but I can tell its not the best I could get.

I am gonna get a hood painted soon. Maybe I can get them to let me have the left over paint.

As for the 2000 grit sanding. If I sand the good paint around the chip would it be noticeable after buffing? Got any links where I could buy this stuff?

If I see it correcrtly, I need some Touch up Primer, Color, Clear, 2000grit sanding paper?
 

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Wax on, Wax off
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
travis, while I am thinking about it...

My spoiler was repainted Black from red. I noticed after buffing it today (its been months and months since it was painted) theres some red showing throught in one small spot. Now, When I feel it... the spot is smooth. I would think if I buffed throught the new paint I would of gone through the clear and then the black back to the sanded red and there would be a dip/pit... but its smooth and glossy.

I swear that it was not there before. How would I have exposed the red without causing a pit/deformity in the paint?
 

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I swear that it was not there before. How would I have exposed the red without causing a pit/deformity in the paint?
Yes, you likely just ate through the clear coat and into the base layer of paint. You can do that VERY easily if you use too much polishing compound and let the buffer sit on the same spot too long. Using pressure will help you eat right through paint as well. Have to be real careful when using a buffer.
 

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Also, Duplicolor makes a line of factory matched paint. For small chips, just a high quality wax remover and make SURE that you get in all angles of the chip so the paint sticks vs. coming off quickly. Using these type of 'touch up' products do not require any clear since they have already been reduced to the factory specs. Just add and let dry. Fairly simple.

For application, I use something called EZ Dabbers from EZ-Mix. You can buy a small tube from Amazon for about 12 bucks. Worth the money. FAR better than using a hobby brush. Amazon.com: E-Z Dabbers: Home Improvement

You can also buy small sanding pens in various grits. Using a good 1000 grit one before you add the paint (and after cleaning) will help the paint stick better and last a real long time. Works very, very well for paint chip applications.
 

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Wax on, Wax off
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, you likely just ate through the clear coat and into the base layer of paint. You can do that VERY easily if you use too much polishing compound and let the buffer sit on the same spot too long. Using pressure will help you eat right through paint as well. Have to be real careful when using a buffer.
True, but the reason it is odd is that it feels like nothing has been removed. Its still as smooth and glossy and the rest of the paint. Plus, this happened on the #3 polish (not a compound) and I am using a DA so there is very little burning action... Just seems odd.
 

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What's this Photoshop?
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The urethane single stage that Travis mentioned doesn't require clear coating. You'll need the clear if you use BC/CC. Just make sure you build it up high enough.

As for sanding your good paint around your chips. It'll only be noticeable if you have orange peel in your paint. The buffed will be smooth.

As for paint. Not your body shop, the place that your body shop buys their paint from would custom mix it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ahh ok. Well my paint does have a good bit of orange peel in it. However if a small amount around the chip was sanded with 2000 and then buffed with a polisher I don't think it would be noticeable...

I remember seeing a Polish on Autogeek that would remove 1500 grit scratches.
 

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True, but the reason it is odd is that it feels like nothing has been removed. Its still as smooth and glossy and the rest of the paint. Plus, this happened on the #3 polish (not a compound) and I am using a DA so there is very little burning action... Just seems odd.
Sounds like you might not have had enough paint on that particular part. A few light coats is far better than a single heavy coat.

Did your pads turn red when you used the DA? Think I read that you use a Porter Cable 7424 like I have.
 

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Rebel Of The Sacred Heart
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I doubt my local body shop has that piece of equipment. The shop does decent work, but I can tell its not the best I could get.

I am gonna get a hood painted soon. Maybe I can get them to let me have the left over paint.

As for the 2000 grit sanding. If I sand the good paint around the chip would it be noticeable after buffing? Got any links where I could buy this stuff?


Yeah, your bodyshop wouldnt be the one that has the magic eye, it would be your local automotive paint supplier that has it. Unless they have their own mixing bank and then they might have one, but probably not. None of the bodyshops in my town have one, but my local PPG jobber has one that i use alot.

The paint left over from your hood would not work for touch ups, because it is a BC/CC(basecoat/clearcoat) paint, and you want a single stage paint for touchups.

If you take your time sanding, there should be almost no sanding done to your clearcoat. All you are trying to accomplish is to level out the single stage you put on with the surrounding clear. You should be able to block the little dot of touch up paint down level, while barely sanding any clear. Also i meant to say sand it with 1500, you can do 2000 if you want to but 1500 will work fine. And with sanding it with 1500 grit youre gonna get the touch up spot level long before you sand all your orange peel away.

This is what i use:
This little block


and these little sanding discs that are desinged to not have any "hard edges" so you dont dig into your clearcoat with the sandpaper edges


You can get them here or somewhere else if you can find them:
https://www.dentcraft.com/c-3-auto-detail.aspx

Now you don't have to use those, just some normal wetordry 3m paper and some type of little block will work fine, but i thought you would like to see what i use.


If I see it correcrtly, I need some Touch up Primer, Color, Clear, 2000grit sanding paper?

Primer, single stage paint and sandpaper. You might also consider getting one of these to sand the chip and remove any rust before you apply your paint


CRL Paint Prep Pen | P3437
travis, while I am thinking about it...

My spoiler was repainted Black from red. I noticed after buffing it today (its been months and months since it was painted) theres some red showing throught in one small spot. Now, When I feel it... the spot is smooth. I would think if I buffed throught the new paint I would of gone through the clear and then the black back to the sanded red and there would be a dip/pit... but its smooth and glossy.

I swear that it was not there before. How would I have exposed the red without causing a pit/deformity in the paint?

It sounds like you burnt through buffing. When you burn through buffing, you wont feel any difference in the burnt through spot from the surrounding area, there wont be a dip in it at all, unless you burn through really bad
True, but the reason it is odd is that it feels like nothing has been removed. Its still as smooth and glossy and the rest of the paint. Plus, this happened on the #3 polish (not a compound) and I am using a DA so there is very little burning action... Just seems odd.

Thats what it feels like when you burn through, "like nothing has been removed". It Will be just as smooth and glossy as the rest of the paint because the spot you burnt through was caused by buffing, therefore its gonna be just as smooth and glossy as the topcoat. Burning through is kinda a misleading term, its called burn through because there was an excessive build up of heat in that area, If you dont keep your buffer moving constantly, you will burn through your paint layers quickly depeding on the pressure your applying, the speed of the buffer, and the aggresivness of the compound or polish. Its not so much if your using a compound or polish, its the heat buildup from the buffer, by moving to slow or having it spinning to fast, that causes you to burn through paint.
Ahh ok. Well my paint does have a good bit of orange peel in it. However if a small amount around the chip was sanded with 2000 and then buffed with a polisher I don't think it would be noticeable...

I remember seeing a Polish on Autogeek that would remove 1500 grit scratches.

If youre careful sanding you should have sanded hardly any clear by the time you block the little bump of touch up paint down level with the clear. You should definitely have it blocked down before you remove all the orange peel from the clear. So yeah, if you take your time and be careful blocking you shouldnt be able to notice it without knowing its there.
Hopefully that help you out some
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, I noticed an even large spot that the black got burnt through today. Its fairly noticeable...

Its on the leg of the spoiler right neat the bottom. I think I can scuff it up and paint it with a coat or two of spray black and clear and it will be fine and blend after some light... LIGHT buffing with only XMT #1 polish (does not even use a cutting pad). Gonna try that on just that leg area before I cough up $100 to repaint it again.
 
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