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Discussion Starter #1
in school we have a transmission out of a 92 or 93 mustang (the transmission says 92 on it but has writen on it in sharpie 93 mustang)

but we cant figure out if its an AOD or a diffrent transmission

my teacher said that its possibly a C-4 but i thought in 91+ foxes they only ran the aod

any help on how we can figure out what tranny it is would be greatly appriciated
 

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Discussion Starter #3
no im pretty sure the early ones had the C-4
 

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The easy way to figure it out is look at the pan. If the pan is small and square its a c4 but if it has a square pan with the two corners angled then it is an AOD. It should be an AOD. I own a Transmission shop so you can trust me on this.lol
 

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The easy way to figure it out is look at the pan. If the pan is small and square its a c4 but if it has a square pan with the two corners angled then it is an AOD. It should be an AOD. I own a Transmission shop so you can trust me on this.lol
+1

"The AOD transmission can be identified in several ways. Its prominent 14-bolt pan is probably the easiest way. The pan is basically square but the back two corners are tucked in a little tighter than the front corners making the pan look like home plate with the front point cut off. Many of the original pans also have Automatic Overdrive and Metric and the Ford oval logo stamped into them. The metric is sort of a misnomer because the internal parts are mainly metric, but not the hardware to install the transmission. Another way to identify the transmission is by the driver's door tag. Ford lists their transmission codes on their Vehicle Certification Label and these are a single letter located along the bottom of the label under the abbreviation TR or TRANS. The AOD transmissions will carry a "T" designation for any rear-wheel drive vehicles. Lastly, you can also check the tag attached to the transmission itself. This is located on the driver's side on the lower bolt that attaches the tailshaft to the transmission body. This tag contains many numbers; however, the first three-letter code on the top of the tag will say PKA (later AOD-E units with electric overdrives are designated as PKC). The AOD used two tail-shaft lengths; a shorter one for passenger cars had an E0AP casting, and the shorter truck castings read F2TP. The longer tail shafts had an E0LP casting on the passenger cars and an E0TP on pickups."

stolen from - Hemmings Motor News: Ford AOD Overdrive Transmission
 

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Discussion Starter #8
the transmission is probably about 4 feet long with the belhousing

and when we put the oil pan next to a picture it didnt look like it matched but i personaly didnt see it so i dont know
 

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+1

"The AOD transmission can be identified in several ways. Its prominent 14-bolt pan is probably the easiest way. The pan is basically square but the back two corners are tucked in a little tighter than the front corners making the pan look like home plate with the front point cut off. Many of the original pans also have Automatic Overdrive and Metric and the Ford oval logo stamped into them. The metric is sort of a misnomer because the internal parts are mainly metric, but not the hardware to install the transmission. Another way to identify the transmission is by the driver's door tag. Ford lists their transmission codes on their Vehicle Certification Label and these are a single letter located along the bottom of the label under the abbreviation TR or TRANS. The AOD transmissions will carry a "T" designation for any rear-wheel drive vehicles. Lastly, you can also check the tag attached to the transmission itself. This is located on the driver's side on the lower bolt that attaches the tailshaft to the transmission body. This tag contains many numbers; however, the first three-letter code on the top of the tag will say PKA (later AOD-E units with electric overdrives are designated as PKC). The AOD used two tail-shaft lengths; a shorter one for passenger cars had an E0AP casting, and the shorter truck castings read F2TP. The longer tail shafts had an E0LP casting on the passenger cars and an E0TP on pickups."

stolen from - Hemmings Motor News: Ford AOD Overdrive Transmission
+1 Count the pan bolts.
 
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