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It would be like them creating a law that your mailman can't ask you if you own a firearm, sure the mailman has no right to ask but is there a problem of them doing it now.
Really? So a mailman keeps record of the questions he asks the people he serves? That's news to me.

Did anyone bother to look into where this lawsuit came from and why it even exists? Does everyone here think that people thought this up out of the blue and then decided to sue to make it illegal?
 

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I dont get it anyway. There are some pro gun peeps that will completely cover their public FB page with guns, amo and other weapons stuff. They talk about their weapons in public and discuss them on public websites. So why does that same person get all crazy if someone ask them if they are a gun owner? I see so many people get defensive as all get out over a question that cannot be used in any way shape or form anyway. My mind keeps going back to those 2 turds that carried those big ass guns into the restaraunt awhile back "because its their right". I dont always understand the mindset of "highly" pro gun people. On the other hand, I dont understand the anti gun nuts either.

Now, some of you are going to flame the hell out of me for this and thats fine...I always take my lickings when it comes to opinion. I think I heard that 3 people are killed by guns in North Phili each day? Please tell me I heard wrong. If not, thats alot of people getting thined from the heard and unfortunately some are innocent. If Im a doctor in north phili where most people are on medical assistance, dont have jobs and the crime rate is higer than average....and Im seeing gun wounds every single day, multiple times a day including deaths by guns...I might be compelled to start asking "do you own a gun"? What aould be the point of the question in that circumstance? Im not even sure but raising the question in an area that sees more gun violence that some war zones may just make a patient think about it. How many people in these communities dont store or lock up their gun correctly with kids around? How many dont have a license to have a gun or have never even bee trained correctly on how to use it? How many of those guns end up accidentally killing or hurting kids? Again, I dont know the statistics but ONE is too many and even a pro gun rights person has to agree that one kid is too many. Im not sure if having a doctor ask if they own a gun is a constructive thing to do or not because I dont think they can divulge that info to anyone anyway due to confidentiality laws. I guess you cant do anything with the answer anyway.
 

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I dont get it anyway. There are some pro gun peeps that will completely cover their public FB page with guns, amo and other weapons stuff. They talk about their weapons in public and discuss them on public websites. So why does that same person get all crazy if someone ask them if they are a gun owner? I see so many people get defensive as all get out over a question that cannot be used in any way shape or form anyway. My mind keeps going back to those 2 turds that carried those big ass guns into the restaraunt awhile back "because its their right". I dont always understand the mindset of "highly" pro gun people. On the other hand, I dont understand the anti gun nuts either.

Now, some of you are going to flame the hell out of me for this and thats fine...I always take my lickings when it comes to opinion. I think I heard that 3 people are killed by guns in North Phili each day? Please tell me I heard wrong. If not, thats alot of people getting thined from the heard and unfortunately some are innocent. If Im a doctor in north phili where most people are on medical assistance, dont have jobs and the crime rate is higer than average....and Im seeing gun wounds every single day, multiple times a day including deaths by guns...I might be compelled to start asking "do you own a gun"? What aould be the point of the question in that circumstance? Im not even sure but raising the question in an area that sees more gun violence that some war zones may just make a patient think about it. How many people in these communities dont store or lock up their gun correctly with kids around? How many dont have a license to have a gun or have never even bee trained correctly on how to use it? How many of those guns end up accidentally killing or hurting kids? Again, I dont know the statistics but ONE is too many and even a pro gun rights person has to agree that one kid is too many. Im not sure if having a doctor ask if they own a gun is a constructive thing to do or not because I dont think they can divulge that info to anyone anyway due to confidentiality laws. I guess you cant do anything with the answer anyway.
There are also plenty of gun people who don't post their guns on websites. The percentage of people who use forums is actually pretty small to the overall populations.

I also found one case in Florida where a pediatrician asked a child's parents if they owned firearms. When the parent's refused to answer the question, the pediatrician refused to see the child. That is exactly what this law is designed to stop. If I can find one case within 1 minute of searching, I'm sure there are more.

There are a lot of pro gun people that will argue for any gun laws and there are a lot of anti gun people that will argue against any gun laws. But this is a common sense law. If gun ownership has no play in what the doctor is doing for the patient, he shouldn't be allowed to ask it and refuse service if it's not answered (or answered how he/she likes it). Does a law need to be created to say this? Going by your "one is too many" idea it does because it has happened at least once in Florida.
 

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Pediatricians also ask in my experience do you have a cleaning supply closet and is it Secure from the child. In short making sure the kids can't get their hand on the stuff bc of the danger behind it. But if they did ask "do you own a gun" and you do own one and you know you keep it secure and its a pediatrician you are talking to are you obligated to say "yes Dr. I own a gun".

Or can you blow off the question in a way and say no. Is he going to look into your eyes and say sir/ma'am I think you are lying to me I think you own a gun so I'm going to search your house. Let's be realistic here. Now if that question is asked and you say know and you own unsecured guns and it just so happens your kid hurts his or herself with your weapon that day then I suppose that could be a can of worms.

Run your household and secure them and if you are asked that question in an appointment outside of mental health then answer how you please. Like the example given where they ask safety questions about th household of the kid. They sometimes ask if you have little plugs for the electrical outlets also. A pediatrician seems to ask an assload of questions when it comes to the household of the child. I think its for good reason though. But you are not obligated to tell a pediatrician that you powder you socks or nu..s in the morning.

Even in the mental health appointments where those questions are to be expected they usually follow up with do you keep them secure and its good to keep them secure especially if you have kids.
 

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There are also plenty of gun people who don't post their guns on websites. The percentage of people who use forums is actually pretty small to the overall populations.

I also found one case in Florida where a pediatrician asked a child's parents if they owned firearms. When the parent's refused to answer the question, the pediatrician refused to see the child. That is exactly what this law is designed to stop. If I can find one case within 1 minute of searching, I'm sure there are more.

There are a lot of pro gun people that will argue for any gun laws and there are a lot of anti gun people that will argue against any gun laws. But this is a common sense law. If gun ownership has no play in what the doctor is doing for the patient, he shouldn't be allowed to ask it and refuse service if it's not answered (or answered how he/she likes it). Does a law need to be created to say this? Going by your "one is too many" idea it does because it has happened at least once in Florida.
Does a doctor have the right to refuse a patient for any reason? I mean if a shop can refuse to serve someone breakfast can a doctor refuse to see a patient? Im not talking about emergency services or a life threatening condition but for a routine exam or check up? We talk about rights alot here so should a doctor be able to ask "do you own a gun, do you have red hair, etc" and then decide if they want to take on the patient? Personally, I wouldnt want to see a doctor that didnt want to see me! Is a doctors office a business? Can it refuse service to anyone it chooses? I know there are discrimination laws and you might have issues if you decided to not take on a patient that is black or muslim or gay but over being a gun owner? Is that discrimination?

I think about my brother in law after he crashed his bike. When he got out of the hospital he had a narcotic pain killer (cant remember the name) prescribed by his doctor. A few days later he went to a neurologist and the neuro prescribed Vicodin. Somehow his first doctor found out a second narcotic pain killer was prescribed and then sent my brother a letter stating "I will no longer serve as your doctor". The Dr basically thought he was abusing prescriptions and decided to dump him as a patient. The Dr was wrong and I know for a fact my brother never even took the first prescribed medication but it didnt matter. The docotr had the right to decline seeing him ever again and didnt really need a reason anyway. My only point is a doctor can refuse service for lots of reasons as far as I understand. If a Dr decides he/she doesnt want the business of gun owners, isnt it their right to make that decision?
 

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Pediatricians also ask in my experience do you have a cleaning supply closet and is it Secure from the child. In short making sure the kids can't get their hand on the stuff bc of the danger behind it. But if they did ask "do you own a gun" and you do own one and you know you keep it secure and its a pediatrician you are talking to are you obligated to say "yes Dr. I own a gun".

Or can you blow off the question in a way and say no. Is he going to look into your eyes and say sir/ma'am I think you are lying to me I think you own a gun so I'm going to search your house. Let's be realistic here. Now if that question is asked and you say know and you own unsecured guns and it just so happens your kid hurts his or herself with your weapon that day then I suppose that could be a can of worms.

Run your household and secure them and if you are asked that question in an appointment outside of mental health then answer how you please. Like the example given where they ask safety questions about th household of the kid. They sometimes ask if you have little plugs for the electrical outlets also. A pediatrician seems to ask an assload of questions when it comes to the household of the child. I think its for good reason though. But you are not obligated to tell a pediatrician that you powder you socks or nu..s in the morning.

Even in the mental health appointments where those questions are to be expected they usually follow up with do you keep them secure and its good to keep them secure especially if you have kids.
You should be allowed to tell the doctor you're not going to answer that question because it doesn't pertain to the kid visiting a pediatrician. A pediatricians job is not to make sure the kid is being raised how he/she thinks they should be. When you have to lie to the doctor about irrelevant questions just so you can see the doctor, that is wrong and I don't see how anyone can think it's right.

---------- Post added at 01:38 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:35 PM ----------

Does a doctor have the right to refuse a patient for any reason?
The short and simple answer.....no. A doctor cannot refuse a patient for any reason. There are several reasons they can refuse a patient and there are several reasons they cannot refuse a patient.

Personally, I wouldnt want to see a doctor that didnt want to see me!
Congrats, but what's the point? Just because you don't want sometime doesn't mean others want it that way. Debating for/against something should never become "I wouldn't want it anyways".

This is a simple law that is saying if it's not relevant then they cannot ask it. Quick Google searching shows it has happened before. I fail to see the major opposition when the biggest counter argument is "it doesn't happen very much" or "you shouldn't have to make laws for such stupid things".
 

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You should be allowed to tell the doctor you're not going to answer that question because it doesn't pertain to the kid visiting a pediatrician. A pediatricians job is not to make sure the kid is being raised how he/she thinks they should be. When you have to lie to the doctor about irrelevant questions just so you can see the doctor, that is wrong and I don't see how anyone can think it's right.

---------- Post added at 01:38 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:35 PM ----------


The short and simple answer.....no. A doctor cannot refuse a patient for any reason. There are several reasons they can refuse a patient and there are several reasons they cannot refuse a patient.


Congrats, but what's the point? Just because you don't want sometime doesn't mean others want it that way. Debating for/against something should never become "I wouldn't want it anyways".

This is a simple law that is saying if it's not relevant then they cannot ask it. Quick Google searching shows it has happened before. I fail to see the major opposition when the biggest counter argument is "it doesn't happen very much" or "you shouldn't have to make laws for such stupid things".
Precisely!
 

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You should be allowed to tell the doctor you're not going to answer that question because it doesn't pertain to the kid visiting a pediatrician. A pediatricians job is not to make sure the kid is being raised how he/she thinks they should be. When you have to lie to the doctor about irrelevant questions just so you can see the doctor, that is wrong and I don't see how anyone can think it's right.

---------- Post added at 01:38 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:35 PM ----------


The short and simple answer.....no. A doctor cannot refuse a patient for any reason. There are several reasons they can refuse a patient and there are several reasons they cannot refuse a patient.


Congrats, but what's the point? Just because you don't want sometime doesn't mean others want it that way. Debating for/against something should never become "I wouldn't want it anyways".

This is a simple law that is saying if it's not relevant then they cannot ask it. Quick Google searching shows it has happened before. I fail to see the major opposition when the biggest counter argument is "it doesn't happen very much" or "you shouldn't have to make laws for such stupid things".
Thats why I say "personally".
 

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You should be allowed to tell the doctor you're not going to answer that question because it doesn't pertain to the kid visiting a pediatrician. A pediatricians job is not to make sure the kid is being raised how he/she thinks they should be. When you have to lie to the doctor about irrelevant questions just so you can see the doctor, that is wrong and I don't see how anyone can think it's right.

---------- Post added at 01:38 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:35 PM ----------



Yeah I see your point. Every appointment I went to with my three kids the oldest when she was born in North Carolina during those appointments they would ask safety related questions like the ones I already listed they didn't mention guns though. Same thing years later with my youngest two when they were born in Texas for the appointments they would ask those questions and it seemed like they were going down a check off list not how they PERSONALLY felt that the child should be raised.

And it wasn't to the point of you say no to this doc or he will kick you out the thing is wtf obligates you to tell him/her that you have that in your house. That could go with any pediatrician not that one specific case. Even in some appointments where some relevant questions have come up I have had to answer in a not such an honest way bc I don't want that crap being in my records. I'm not under oath or playing pope when I'm sitting in front of a doctor so what if you don't tell a dermatologist no sir I don't have a gun when you go in to get seen about a bad sunburn. Like I said though I see your point. I guess besides the few cases that can be dug up this was some HUGE problem that had to be addressed.
 

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As a LEO, the only time it is legal to ask if a person owns a firearm is if it is relevant to the case being investigated. Or, if it is an officer safety concern during a domestic, because of the atmosphere, and high levels of emotions.

A doctor should only ask if you have a firearm if you are being treated for a gun shot wound. Other than that, it isn't relevant, it would also be a violation of the 4th and 5th amendment if they report that information to any federal agency.

There is also an emerging trend in Health care professionals to lecture, or report gun owners out of a false sense of "I know what's best, I'm a do gooder." It isn't their place, and I don't care if I have a youtube channel, or have pictures of my guns here and on HKpro. It isn't their business if I have a gun. They also report if someone is taking pain killers, anti-depressants, or are, in their eyes, exhibiting signs of a mental disorder, to include PTSD.

There's a fellow 1st class here, that was diagnosed with PTSD because he can't turn his heightened situational awareness off. No panic attacks, no reliving combat episodes, and no other adverse effects. He was immediately decertified from Air Crew and put at a desk. He wants to be a police officer when he retires, but isn't sure he can now. That's the bullshit they're pulling. Stuff like that. This is what this ruling is for.

Is it going to work for everyone? no, but will it be a vast improvement for those knight in shining armor anti-gun doctors? YUP.
 
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