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what cc plates do you recomend ive been looking around and dont know a whole lot about them. I have eibach sportline springs in the car i had it aligned after the install but should i buy some plates? I just recently noticed the tire cupping slightly on the outside
 

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I just bought some MM C&C plates from CJ pony parts for $200 shipped. I'd take a look at them.
 

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what cc plates do you recomend ive been looking around and dont know a whole lot about them. I have eibach sportline springs in the car i had it aligned after the install but should i buy some plates? I just recently noticed the tire cupping slightly on the outside
Scalloping generally indicates worn suspension components, not an alignment issue.

Lowering or cars increases negative camber, and if lowered more than 1-1/2" it can be increased enough that the stock CC plates will not allow sufficient adjustment to get the camber back to the stock spec of -0.50° ± 0.75° (a range of +0.25° to -1.25°). Too much (-1.5° or more) negative camber will cause the front tires to wear on the inside, not scallop just wear. It also (up to -3.5°) improves handling, though at the price of faster tire wear.

When you had your front-end aligned what were the final specs? Did they make any comments about camber adjustment?

FWIW I run -1.75° camber because I like the improved handing, tire wear be dammed...
 

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Sorry OP but I have a question for cliffyk.

Are caster camber plates unnecessary then if you want the negative camber up front? And what's the difference in handling?
 

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Sorry OP but I have a question for cliffyk.

Are caster camber plates unnecessary then if you want the negative camber up front? And what's the difference in handling?
They are unnecessary if you can get the front-end aligned to the specs you want with the stock CC plates--which are adjustable but however with very limited range (you can file out the holes a bit to gain some range).

The most improvement from increased camber is in tight turns where body roll causes the inside wheel to drop relative to the chassis and "roll under" moving to positive camber. This reduces the contact patch and therefore traction--not what you want to have happen in a tight turn.

The improvement is quite noticeable IF you are the sort that makes tight high-speed turns, or the sort that intensely dislikes the plowing through turns and understeer of the stock camber specification...
 
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