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Certified Bwaloligisit
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Discussion Starter #1
My new job requires me leaving at 5am and I daily drive my truck, which is considerably loud at idle with the cam and just a single chambered muffler no cats. With it being cold I usually like to let my stuff idle for about 15 minutes to get warm and let the oil loosen up before I hit the road, but I'm worried that doing that at 4:40 in the morning when my truck parks right next to someone's kitchen and bedroom, will lead to getting complaints. So has anyone here combated this with your stuff or do you just say **** the world? Lol
 

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PSN alphadong11
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28,934 Posts
I'm not a morning person so i usually just stand in the shower too long making me late. So by the time I get to the truck I may let it go 30 seconds before I roll out. Slowly
 

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missippi roolz
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9,244 Posts
Easy. Just buy a brand new $60,000 F-150 with heated seats, heated steering wheel, and remote start. Exhaust should be quiet enough. Or wait, is that the $80,000 model? I can't keep track of all these low-cost vehicles these days.
 

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Bo Baustin
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13,134 Posts
There really isn't much need to warm up vehicles. I know it's a back and forth thing, but if your truck is fuel injected you should be able to just start it, wait for a few seconds for the idle to even out and lightly drive away.

Engineering explained did a video about warming up your car and what it does to the oil, the longer it runs without being up to temp the more wear on the engine and the more it dilutes the oil.


If your truck is carb'd and you need to warm it up, I might look into a big muffler.
 

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Rent Asunder!
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The oil will take a long time to warm up just sitting at idle. The oil gets warmed up primarily by shear friction (oil squeezing through bearings) and heat radiating through the internal parts from combustion. There's very little pressure on the bearings at idle so very little shear action. If you drive it, that puts pressure in the chambers that puts pressure on the crank and bearings increasing shear and heating up the oil. You'll put more heat in the oil in 2 minutes of driving than 15 minutes of idling.

That said... I also agree with **** the world. lol
 

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Certified Bwaloligisit
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Discussion Starter #6
There really isn't much need to warm up vehicles. I know it's a back and forth thing, but if your truck is fuel injected you should be able to just start it, wait for a few seconds for the idle to even out and lightly drive away.

Engineering explained did a video about warming up your car and what it does to the oil, the longer it runs without being up to temp the more wear on the engine and the more it dilutes the oil.

Should You Warm Up Your Car Before Driving? - YouTube

If your truck is carb'd and you need to warm it up, I might look into a big muffler.
what is this "fuel injection" you speak of. yeah the truck is a carb'd 383.

The oil will take a long time to warm up just sitting at idle. The oil gets warmed up primarily by shear friction (oil squeezing through bearings) and heat radiating through the internal parts from combustion. There's very little pressure on the bearings at idle so very little shear action. If you drive it, that puts pressure in the chambers that puts pressure on the crank and bearings increasing shear and heating up the oil. You'll put more heat in the oil in 2 minutes of driving than 15 minutes of idling.

That said... I also agree with **** the world. lol
I guess I just feel for the motor to much and dont like to drive away when it's bone cold and reading 65lbs of oil pressure when I could drive away with it reading a normal 20lbs lol.

I guess I also like getting into a warm truck and not freeze my ass off the first 10 minutes of my journey lol
 

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Certified Bwaloligisit
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28,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
has a magnaflow right now but no idea what size or what it is. all I know is its a dual in and out and seems to be fairly large. Ill look into it. Thing is I like its volume now so I dont want to loose too much of it. Electric cut outs to a second muffler? lol
 

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Certified Bwaloligisit
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Discussion Starter #10
hmmmm that would be pretty doable. so Muffler > cutout > muffler? I think tho a challenge there would be haveing the space to do it. I know my current muffler sits just under the cab, and then theres maybe 4 feet before the exhaust bends over the axle. also since its a dual inlet and outlet, that means I need room for the pipes to split and go over the rear. hmmm. anything is doable but just need to get creative
 

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Bo Baustin
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hmmmm that would be pretty doable. so Muffler > cutout > muffler? I think tho a challenge there would be haveing the space to do it. I know my current muffler sits just under the cab, and then theres maybe 4 feet before the exhaust bends over the axle. also since its a dual inlet and outlet, that means I need room for the pipes to split and go over the rear. hmmm. anything is doable but just need to get creative
Really any half decent muffler shop should be able to do it for you for pretty cheap. Including welding in the cut outs.

I would probably save myself some money and wire the cutouts myself, just have them weld it in.

Or your other option is to replace the current muffler with a much quieter one and do the cut outs before. Granted it will probably sound like ****.
 

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Registered
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My new job requires me leaving at 5am and I daily drive my truck, which is considerably loud at idle with the cam and just a single chambered muffler no cats. With it being cold I usually like to let my stuff idle for about 15 minutes to get warm and let the oil loosen up before I hit the road, but I'm worried that doing that at 4:40 in the morning when my truck parks right next to someone's kitchen and bedroom, will lead to getting complaints. So has anyone here combated this with your stuff or do you just say **** the world? Lol
Don't let your truck warm up by idling. Hard on the rings, wastes fuel, etc.

The best way to warm up a cold vehicle is to drive it gently. Keep it below 3000rpm until it's up to normal temp.
Yeah, it sucks getting into a cold car, but dress for the weather and you'll be fine. Within 2 to 3 minutes of driving, it'll be blowing warm air. If you have heated seats, use them, you'll be comfortable while the car warms up as they start working almost immediately.

Trust me, I live in northern Minnesota. So far it's been -10 or colder actual temp when I leave the house. I turn the car on, scrape the windows, and within 30 seconds to a minute am driving away.

If your car is loud, at idle it shouldn't be a huge deal. Had a neighbor with a harley that would idle it up in the morning, mildly irritating, but not the end of the world, and that was only when my windows were open. If they were shut, wasn't an issue.
 

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Certified Bwaloligisit
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Discussion Starter #13
maybe I just worry too much. probably what Ill do is let it run for a few minutes since she is carbed and then head out vs letting it sit for about 15 minutes before leaving
 

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missippi roolz
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Just sit in the truck, pump the gas pedal two dozen times to make sure there's plenty of fuel in the carburetor, and on the 25th pump, just hold down the gas pedal to the floor and crank the engine. Turn the engine off and on three more times and on the final time, spray baby powder into the defrost vents and set the fan to full blast. That puppy will be warm as possible and you'll be fresh and ready to face the day headstrong.
 

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Rent Asunder!
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Does your intake manifold have an exhaust crossover under the plenum / carb pad? If so, there's no warm up on the carb necessary. Just hop in, fire it up, and drive.

If you have a hesitation when the engine is cold, it means you aren't getting sufficient fuel atomization. The intake is too cold so the fuel forms into bigger droplets and puddles in the plenum and runner rather than staying suspended in the air going to the cylinders. This causes misfires and hesitation. Usually if you have an exhaust crossover, you won't have this problem unless the carb just isn't worth a crap. (*cough* Shitelbrock *cough*)
 

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Certified Bwaloligisit
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Discussion Starter #16
I do have a spacer in between the carb and intake since i have been having vapor lock issues, but no idea if im having shuddering issues when bone cold.
 

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Powered by LSx tears
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All these replies, and nobody has suggested a block heater? Smh

Buy a block heater, and plug your truck in. And always let a vehicle idle a few minutes when it’s cold before driving.......unless you have a block heater ;)
 

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All these replies, and nobody has suggested a block heater? Smh

Buy a block heater, and plug your truck in. And always let a vehicle idle a few minutes when it’s cold before driving.......unless you have a block heater ;)
"A few minutes" is too long. On a carbureted vehicle maybe, but on fuel injected? 30 seconds is all it needs to get the oil into the entire engine.

I lived in Ohio, it doesn't get that cold there. I live in Minnesota now, it was -7 this morning, I fired up my 1999 Subaru Forester, it fired right up, I got out, scraped off the windshield, and drove away. As long as you don't rev the **** out of it, it'll warm up nice and fast, no problem. I'm feeling heat within 5 minutes.

To help ease the cold oil issue, run synthetic. Just because it's an older engine doesn't mean synthetic oil is bad for it, you can run synthetic in any engine, and it'll be fine. I personally use Mobil1 0w30 because of how cold it gets here, and even in my Thunderbird I run 0w30 for better cold start protection even though it doesn't get run in the winter.

You may not need that extreme, but really, synthetic flows so much better in the cold than dino oil, it's worth the investment.
 
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