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"A few minutes" is too long. On a carbureted vehicle maybe, but on fuel injected? 30 seconds is all it needs to get the oil into the entire engine.

I lived in Ohio, it doesn't get that cold there. I live in Minnesota now, it was -7 this morning, I fired up my 1999 Subaru Forester, it fired right up, I got out, scraped off the windshield, and drove away. As long as you don't rev the **** out of it, it'll warm up nice and fast, no problem. I'm feeling heat within 5 minutes.

To help ease the cold oil issue, run synthetic. Just because it's an older engine doesn't mean synthetic oil is bad for it, you can run synthetic in any engine, and it'll be fine. I personally use Mobil1 0w30 because of how cold it gets here, and even in my Thunderbird I run 0w30 for better cold start protection even though it doesn't get run in the winter.

You may not need that extreme, but really, synthetic flows so much better in the cold than dino oil, it's worth the investment.
Well, it's carbureted, BUT since this is opened up, how is the oil different in a carbureted engine, than a fuel injected one? Did the internal components of the engine change, based on the induction/fuel delivery? A few minutes is not too long. Idling a cold engine will never be harder on it, than placing a load on a cold engine. It's more than oil. Parts need to time to properly heat, and expand. You will never hurt a engine by letting it warm up before placing a load on it. The opposite can not be said for placing a load on a cold engine.
 

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Certified Bwaloligisit
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Discussion Starter #22
That's the view point I've always went by, Craig. And this year here in Ohio has been pretty cold. Not Minnesota cold but we've had a good number of mornings in the negatives and a ton of mornings in the single digits. I just hate to think of starting a motor regardless of what ever it is, and drove away when it's 2* out. Even if they say it's cool to do that, I always wondered how much stress goes on through the motor while parts heat and expand and while oil is thick and heavy. Idk.
 

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That's the view point I've always went by, Craig. And this year here in Ohio has been pretty cold. Not Minnesota cold but we've had a good number of mornings in the negatives and a ton of mornings in the single digits. I just hate to think of starting a motor regardless of what ever it is, and drove away when it's 2* out. Even if they say it's cool to do that, I always wondered how much stress goes on through the motor while parts heat and expand and while oil is thick and heavy. Idk.
Block heater is pretty cheap and easy. If I were concerned about the noise, that's what I'd do.
 

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Bo Baustin
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Well, it's carbureted, BUT since this is opened up, how is the oil different in a carbureted engine, than a fuel injected one? Did the internal components of the engine change, based on the induction/fuel delivery? A few minutes is not too long. Idling a cold engine will never be harder on it, than placing a load on a cold engine. It's more than oil. Parts need to time to properly heat, and expand. You will never hurt a engine by letting it warm up before placing a load on it. The opposite can not be said for placing a load on a cold engine.
According to a powertrain engineer on one of the other Mustang forums, the reason modern cars immediately jump to a high idle when cold is to A)warm up the cats quicker B)warm up the parts quicker and C) lubricate the engine. They also don't recommend allowing the engine to sit and idle to warm up.

Going back to the video, I'd prefer less time for the engine to remain cold and wash down the cylinder walls and dilute the oil with gas. Once the idle falls, I drive away and keep it below 2300rpm or so until head temps are over 175.

Although, I highly doubt there would be any more or less wear between a car that idled for 30 seconds before driving vs a few minutes over the life of the vehicle. The only difference you would see is worse fuel economy by a small amount and maybe worse used oil analysis.

The oil dilution is an interesting one, I would like to see UOA from idling a car for 30 seconds vs a few minutes every morning. I would do it myself but I don't drive enough. It would take me 1.5 years to get a good test out of that based on how often I drive and I hardly ever keep vehicles long enough for that. If the oil dilution is a problem it could potentially damage the engine while it's up to temperature and put under a heavy load for an extended period of time.
 

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Block heater is pretty cheap and easy. If I were concerned about the noise, that's what I'd do.
Might do that just to make things easier. I feel bad for my neighbor who litteraly sleeps right next door to my truck with just a wall sperating the noise lol
 

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Well, it's carbureted, BUT since this is opened up, how is the oil different in a carbureted engine, than a fuel injected one? Did the internal components of the engine change, based on the induction/fuel delivery? A few minutes is not too long. Idling a cold engine will never be harder on it, than placing a load on a cold engine. It's more than oil. Parts need to time to properly heat, and expand. You will never hurt a engine by letting it warm up before placing a load on it. The opposite can not be said for placing a load on a cold engine.
There is no functional difference in oil between a carbureted and fuel injected engine.
I understand the expansion rate, and again, there is no functional difference between carb/fuel injection.

The only reason I brought oil into the equation was that synthetic oils maintain their flow characteristics in the extreme cold much better than conventional oils do. There are a multitude of videos showing the difference even between various synthetic oils and conventional oil in -20 F temperatures, and of them all, Mobil 1 flowed the fastest in the extreme cold. Based on that alone, I'd rather have oil that actually flows in my engine.

Yes, a block heater is a great addition, they'll warm your coolant up to 100* F or so. I had one in an old Suburban, and it never failed to start, but that was before I was using synthetic oil, and it doesn't necessarily heat the oil because no engine I've ever had put coolant in the oil pan, so it won't warm the pan since heat rises. So even with a block heater, I'd still run synthetic oil.

The fastest way to warm an engine is under a light load. As I said, you run the engine 30 seconds to a minute to get the oil into the system, then you drive it under a light load, and it'll warm up quickly vs idling it for 15 minutes or so. Everything will come up to temp as intended, and as long as you're not revving it like crazy, it'll be fine. If you are cold, installing seat heaters isn't complicated, and you don't waste gas, get your rings worn out, etc.

My 1999 Subaru does fine, warms up to normal on a -20 day within 5 minutes of driving under light load, my 2002 Crown Vic also did fine again with a few minutes of normal driving, my wife's 2016 Escape again does fine with light load driving.

Synthetic oil is the only stuff I'll put in any of my cars. No matter when they were built, it just flows better.
 

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Nope. Chuck testa

---------- Post added at 12:01 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:00 PM ----------

I wrap mine in an electric blanket and plugged it into the neighbors outlet. The bad part is getting all the cats out of the engine bay when they find the warmth. Or it's a hell of a mess.
 

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Also...
I use the Torque app on my phone, along with a bluetooth OBD2 scanner. I have a dashboard up with various readouts including coolant temp as measured by the ECU.

My car was reading 4* F coolant temp by the time the phone paired with the scanner (about 10 seconds after the car was started). Within the 30 seconds or so it took to clear my windshield, I was up to 70*F coolant temp. I was at 100* by the time I was at the stop sign at the end of my street.

Yes, the block heater will "kick start" your coolant and warm it up, but not all that much. And since it doesn't heat the pan (unless you get a magnetic pan heater), the oil is still stone cold.
 

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According to a powertrain engineer on one of the other Mustang forums, the reason modern cars immediately jump to a high idle when cold is to A)warm up the cats quicker B)warm up the parts quicker and C) lubricate the engine. They also don't recommend allowing the engine to sit and idle to warm up.

Going back to the video, I'd prefer less time for the engine to remain cold and wash down the cylinder walls and dilute the oil with gas. Once the idle falls, I drive away and keep it below 2300rpm or so until head temps are over 175.

Although, I highly doubt there would be any more or less wear between a car that idled for 30 seconds before driving vs a few minutes over the life of the vehicle. The only difference you would see is worse fuel economy by a small amount and maybe worse used oil analysis.

The oil dilution is an interesting one, I would like to see UOA from idling a car for 30 seconds vs a few minutes every morning. I would do it myself but I don't drive enough. It would take me 1.5 years to get a good test out of that based on how often I drive and I hardly ever keep vehicles long enough for that. If the oil dilution is a problem it could potentially damage the engine while it's up to temperature and put under a heavy load for an extended period of time.

I find it odd that these videos started popping up around the same time CAFE standards were released. I know my truck can show a 2 MPG difference per tank, between idling in the morning, and not. Surly the wouldn’t wouldn’t say things to help them meet those standards ;)

As far as washing down the cylinders, no measurable wear and tear that you’ll ever notice will happen, especially in a FI motor. Same could be said for warming it up vs not. It’s really all splitting hairs, just like the synthetic oil vs dino oil debate. Have you ever, or do you know anyone who has ever, lost an engine because of the type of oil they run? Yeah, me either. Nobody has ever had a blown up engine and said “yep. If you’d have been running synthetic, that engine would still be alive.” It’s bullshit. This truck I have now is the only thing I’ve ever put synthetic oil in, and the only engine I’ve ever lost was my 408. You think synthetic would have saved it from breaking that rod? LOL. It’s all ****ing bullshit. Maintenence is what matters. Run oreillys brand oil in it, as long as you change it, and that’s not just me talking. My C4 with a 5000 stall, that got driven everywhere, and smacked with 800 hp had oreillys brand trans fluid in it. Never a issue, and it took way more abuse than my motor oil.
There is no functional difference in oil between a carbureted and fuel injected engine.
I understand the expansion rate, and again, there is no functional difference between carb/fuel injection.

The only reason I brought oil into the equation was that synthetic oils maintain their flow characteristics in the extreme cold much better than conventional oils do. There are a multitude of videos showing the difference even between various synthetic oils and conventional oil in -20 F temperatures, and of them all, Mobil 1 flowed the fastest in the extreme cold. Based on that alone, I'd rather have oil that actually flows in my engine.

Yes, a block heater is a great addition, they'll warm your coolant up to 100* F or so. I had one in an old Suburban, and it never failed to start, but that was before I was using synthetic oil, and it doesn't necessarily heat the oil because no engine I've ever had put coolant in the oil pan, so it won't warm the pan since heat rises. So even with a block heater, I'd still run synthetic oil.

The fastest way to warm an engine is under a light load. As I said, you run the engine 30 seconds to a minute to get the oil into the system, then you drive it under a light load, and it'll warm up quickly vs idling it for 15 minutes or so. Everything will come up to temp as intended, and as long as you're not revving it like crazy, it'll be fine. If you are cold, installing seat heaters isn't complicated, and you don't waste gas, get your rings worn out, etc.

My 1999 Subaru does fine, warms up to normal on a -20 day within 5 minutes of driving under light load, my 2002 Crown Vic also did fine again with a few minutes of normal driving, my wife's 2016 Escape again does fine with light load driving.

Synthetic oil is the only stuff I'll put in any of my cars. No matter when they were built, it just flows better.
Have you ever damaged a engine directly related to the oil that was in it?
Also...
I use the Torque app on my phone, along with a bluetooth OBD2 scanner. I have a dashboard up with various readouts including coolant temp as measured by the ECU.

My car was reading 4* F coolant temp by the time the phone paired with the scanner (about 10 seconds after the car was started). Within the 30 seconds or so it took to clear my windshield, I was up to 70*F coolant temp. I was at 100* by the time I was at the stop sign at the end of my street.

Yes, the block heater will "kick start" your coolant and warm it up, but not all that much. And since it doesn't heat the pan (unless you get a magnetic pan heater), the oil is still stone cold.
My truck tells me all that stuff right on the dash and it doesn’t warm up that fast, and I’m in Texas. So, to keep this on topic, since people like to redirect what’s being said, to for their argument, keeping the coolant warm is exactly what he needs. The exact question was in regard to warming his truck up in the morning, and not disturbing his neighbors. Warmer coolant = warmer air out the dash. Aside from that, I mentioned earlier, it’s more than oil. If the coolant is warm, you know what else is warm? The whole block, around the cylinder, pistons, Ect. Exactly what needs to be warm.
 

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Bo Baustin
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I find it odd that these videos started popping up around the same time CAFE standards were released. I know my truck can show a 2 MPG difference per tank, between idling in the morning, and not. Surly the wouldn’t wouldn’t say things to help them meet those standards ;)


Have you ever damaged a engine directly related to the oil that was in it?
Idling isn't part of cafe testing standards on passenger cars it appears. Only on big trucks. It doesn't look like there is any actual incentive for an automaker to suggest that for part of the emissions requirements. Unless the government requires them to put that in writing, which in that case you would expect a power train engineer who doesn't work for that specific company to go against the companies suggestions due to EPA requirements. Unless he agrees with it.

Also, I know this doesn't apply to this conversation, as normal humans don't actually drive like this but I won't ever run cheap oil in stuff that gets beat on.

Back in high school, my best friend and I did destroy cheap oil in his old prelude. How much damage it actually took we will never know but it sure as hell wasn't good for it.

We used to beat the piss out of it, like running it at full throttle, 5500 rpm, in 3rd gear (it couldn't do over 85) for 20 miles straight on the highway. It took all the abuse we ever threw at it and it never had any problems. He ended up swapping from Mobile 1 to whatever was on sale on the window at Autozone. We were going for a drive and did the exact same thing that we had done like 10x before and car acted like it was out of gas after like 2 miles. We pulled off, car smoking out the exhaust, checked the oil (which only had a few hundred miles on it) and there was zero oil on the dipstick. It could barely even idle. He had extra oil in the car so we poured a quart into it and drove it very nicely to my parents house and did an oil change there. It was straight black, sludgy and smelled bad.

He ended up getting another few thousand miles out of it or so before the t belt snapped (which was supposed to have been done like 30K miles earlier). That was 12 years ago so maybe bottom of the barrel conventionals have gotten better but I'm sure as hell not running them. We almost lost that engine that day but got lucky we caught it in time. It was like the oil was being instantly vaporized and feeding directly into the intake and the car was trying to run on it.
 

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Have you ever damaged a engine directly related to the oil that was in it?
No. The only motor I've ever destroyed was because my dumb ass didn't route my remote oil filter line away from the tire far enough, I rubbed it, it burst, and good bye oil pressure, hellow spun bearings.

However, having lived in Ohio (near Toledo) and now in Minnesota, and having grown up in Texas, I'm intimately familiar with lots of different climates. When I lived in Ohio, a "cold" morning was 10 degrees F or so.
In Houston, a "cold" morning was about 33 degrees F.
Here, a cold morning will be -27 actual temp (not wind chill numbers, because those are bullshit).

Back in 2011/2012 when we had the "polar vortex" winter where we had three consecutive weeks where the high temp was still double digits below zero, my 2002 Crown Vic with 0w30 Mobil 1 would start up just fine, no ugly noises, no ticking from the top end, no issues. My work van, a 2007 Caravan CV (windowless rape van in minivan form basically) which had regular dino style Pennzoil 5w20 in it (because that's what the shop we get our oil changes at does) would literally scream when starting up. The oil was so cold at -20 F ambient temp, it wouldn't flow, and it put a LOT of wear and tear on that motor. We kept oil in it, it didn't burn any, but those noises made me not want to start it up.

My truck tells me all that stuff right on the dash and it doesn’t warm up that fast, and I’m in Texas. So, to keep this on topic, since people like to redirect what’s being said, to for their argument, keeping the coolant warm is exactly what he needs. The exact question was in regard to warming his truck up in the morning, and not disturbing his neighbors. Warmer coolant = warmer air out the dash. Aside from that, I mentioned earlier, it’s more than oil. If the coolant is warm, you know what else is warm? The whole block, around the cylinder, pistons, Ect. Exactly what needs to be warm.
Regarding your temperature gauge, the needle on my Thunderbird is an idiot light. If it's below 120 degrees, it doesn't move yet. Once it gets to 155 or so, it moves right smack to the middle of the gauge, and it'll register if it goes over 210 by moving up. My sensor reading the data direct from the ECU however, will tell me exactly what temp the car is at. On my Subaru, the needle doesn't move till it hits 110 or so, it goes half way between C and the mid point at about 130, and parks in the middle from 160 to 200. I haven't gotten it hotter than 200 yet, because it's a Subaru and the head gaskets will blow if you look at them crosseyed, and I live in Duluth, MN so 200 degrees only happens inside an oven. But just because your needle doesn't move fast doesn't mean the car isn't warming up quick.

I do agree, having the coolant warming the block is a good thing. I never said it wasn't. But, that doesn't heat up the oil. I admit, I live in the freaking cold and that puts some extremes into the situation, but because of that, and having seen videos of various oils and how they flow at various temps, I'll stick with my synthetic just to keep any issues from happening.

Here's the video if you're interested.
 

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Rent Asunder!
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Well, it's carbureted, BUT since this is opened up, how is the oil different in a carbureted engine, than a fuel injected one? Did the internal components of the engine change, based on the induction/fuel delivery? A few minutes is not too long. Idling a cold engine will never be harder on it, than placing a load on a cold engine. It's more than oil. Parts need to time to properly heat, and expand. You will never hurt a engine by letting it warm up before placing a load on it. The opposite can not be said for placing a load on a cold engine.
At the same time, how do you put heat in an engine? By putting a load on it.

I feel like we've had this discussion before. I'm getting a lot of deja vu.

I normally don't allow my car to warm up more than about 30 seconds. I think I may take a UOA when I change the oil this weekend, and then for the next few months let it idle until it's fully warmed up, and then submit another UOA at the same mileage. I'm curious if it would show any changes.
 

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The warm air coming out of my dash after 5 minutes of idling with no load doesn’t magically appear from nowhere.

---------- Post added at 06:40 AM ---------- Previous post was at 06:31 AM ----------

No. The only motor I've ever destroyed was because my dumb ass didn't route my remote oil filter line away from the tire far enough, I rubbed it, it burst, and good bye oil pressure, hellow spun bearings.

However, having lived in Ohio (near Toledo) and now in Minnesota, and having grown up in Texas, I'm intimately familiar with lots of different climates. When I lived in Ohio, a "cold" morning was 10 degrees F or so.
In Houston, a "cold" morning was about 33 degrees F.
Here, a cold morning will be -27 actual temp (not wind chill numbers, because those are bullshit).

Back in 2011/2012 when we had the "polar vortex" winter where we had three consecutive weeks where the high temp was still double digits below zero, my 2002 Crown Vic with 0w30 Mobil 1 would start up just fine, no ugly noises, no ticking from the top end, no issues. My work van, a 2007 Caravan CV (windowless rape van in minivan form basically) which had regular dino style Pennzoil 5w20 in it (because that's what the shop we get our oil changes at does) would literally scream when starting up. The oil was so cold at -20 F ambient temp, it wouldn't flow, and it put a LOT of wear and tear on that motor. We kept oil in it, it didn't burn any, but those noises made me not want to start it up.



Regarding your temperature gauge, the needle on my Thunderbird is an idiot light. If it's below 120 degrees, it doesn't move yet. Once it gets to 155 or so, it moves right smack to the middle of the gauge, and it'll register if it goes over 210 by moving up. My sensor reading the data direct from the ECU however, will tell me exactly what temp the car is at. On my Subaru, the needle doesn't move till it hits 110 or so, it goes half way between C and the mid point at about 130, and parks in the middle from 160 to 200. I haven't gotten it hotter than 200 yet, because it's a Subaru and the head gaskets will blow if you look at them crosseyed, and I live in Duluth, MN so 200 degrees only happens inside an oven. But just because your needle doesn't move fast doesn't mean the car isn't warming up quick.

I do agree, having the coolant warming the block is a good thing. I never said it wasn't. But, that doesn't heat up the oil. I admit, I live in the freaking cold and that puts some extremes into the situation, but because of that, and having seen videos of various oils and how they flow at various temps, I'll stick with my synthetic just to keep any issues from happening.

Here's the video if you're interested.
-40 Mobil 1 Amsoil Royal Purple comparison - YouTube

Maybe I should have been more specific. My truck has a page right there on the dash that has a numerical read out of all the temperatures and pressures straight from the ECU. I’m not talking about looking at needles. I’m not saying synthetic oils are bad. As I said, I’m running it in my new truck, but it’s got a 5.7 hemi in it, and I’d like to give it the best chance possible to keep the camshaft from eating lobes. Lol. Even though, FCA still recommends conventional oil and changes at 10K. I still say run whatever oil you want, and you will not lose an engine due to it, given you do the proper maintenence. My wife’s car has 125K miles of valvoline conventional oil changes. Maintenence is the key.
 

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Bo Baustin
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I did a little test to satisfy my own curiosity.

It's not perfect but it does kinda show some differences between idling and light driving.

Light driving test - early morning

28 ambient

engine head temp 29 degrees to start

35 seconds of idling the head temp was up to 70 degrees. I didn't purposely wait, that's just how long it took me to move some stuff out of my pockets, buckle, play with the timer and clear some of the light haze from the windshield and drive away.

Driving was shifting at 2k rpm, being as nice to it as I could. For probably 3 minutes straight I was on nearly level ground, in 6th gear at 1400-1600 rpm.

After 6 minutes and 5 seconds the head temp was up to 175 degrees, which is where I'm comfortable that the engine is warm enough to get on it. It also happens to be more or less the most common time for the oil to hit the "normal" range which is 140 degrees.

Idle test

24 ambient

head temp to start 43 degrees (It was after work and the engine had been run a few hours before)

I didn't get the time to 70 degrees, because it happened so fast. Still had too much temp in it I guess.

At the 6 minute 5 second mark, the car had only made it to 132.

By 13 minutes and 8 seconds it finally reached 175.
 

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Even my fuel injected Mustang needs to warm up before driving. Not so much concerned about the oil but it does stumble on initial tip in before she warms up. We tried some different tuning strategies but came to the conclusion that when the manifold is cold it just doesn't seem to want to run all that smooth. I usually start my car and start driving it once I see the cylinder temp gauge start to move. That can be anywhere from a minute to 4-5 minutes.

I've got headers, OR mid-pipe and outlaws. My **** is loud in the mornings and sometimes I start her up pretty darn early in the morning. I'm sure it might be a little loud for some of my neighbors but we also have 1/2 dozen diesels on our street that get started up every morning too.
 

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I did a little test to satisfy my own curiosity.

It's not perfect but it does kinda show some differences between idling and light driving.

Light driving test - early morning

28 ambient

engine head temp 29 degrees to start

35 seconds of idling the head temp was up to 70 degrees. I didn't purposely wait, that's just how long it took me to move some stuff out of my pockets, buckle, play with the timer and clear some of the light haze from the windshield and drive away.

Driving was shifting at 2k rpm, being as nice to it as I could. For probably 3 minutes straight I was on nearly level ground, in 6th gear at 1400-1600 rpm.

After 6 minutes and 5 seconds the head temp was up to 175 degrees, which is where I'm comfortable that the engine is warm enough to get on it. It also happens to be more or less the most common time for the oil to hit the "normal" range which is 140 degrees.

Idle test

24 ambient

head temp to start 43 degrees (It was after work and the engine had been run a few hours before)

I didn't get the time to 70 degrees, because it happened so fast. Still had too much temp in it I guess.

At the 6 minute 5 second mark, the car had only made it to 132.

By 13 minutes and 8 seconds it finally reached 175.
I did a similar test last week...

Turned car on to connect my OBD2 reader, coolant read at 1.4*F, started car, was at 100* within 4 minutes of driving (shifting at 3000rpm, subaru boxer 4, it is happiest between 2000 and 3000 rpm), driving easy. Doing about 30 miles an hour. But, at about 6 minutes I was up to 60mph, again shifting at 3000, cruising at 2500 @ 60. Was at "normal" which is 160*F within 8 minutes on a morning that was hovering at 0* ambient temp.
 

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Okay??? It warms up faster. I’m pretty sure anyone would expect to see that.

Here’s a question. How much of a load does the manufacturer say I can put on a cold engine? And what would they like me to use to measure the load?

---------- Post added at 07:16 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:13 AM ----------

Oh, and I ask this as my truck is outside running, waiting to take the kids to school. I’m killing it! Ahhhhhh. Nah, I’m really not. It’ll be fine, just like engines have been since the beginning of engines. Lol

---------- Post added at 07:17 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:16 AM ----------

Oh and it still has the straight pennzoil conventional oil in it, that FCA engineers seems to think is fine for it when they built it.

---------- Post added at 07:54 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:17 AM ----------

So here's how my test went.


My truck ran for an unknown amount of time, because I really don't care enough to put the effort into timing it, and when I opened the door, this rush of warm, comforting air hit me in the face. I quickly climbed in and shut the door, trying to let as little of the warm air out as possible. As soon as my ass hit the seat, and my hands hit the steering wheel, I thought to myself, damn that's warm! Well, those are both electricslly heated items, but having the air around them warm was also nice.


I took my time getting situated in the truck, not in a hurry, because I wasn't freezing my ass off, and when I reached down to put the truck in drive, I knew the engine was warm and ready to go, because it told me so. It thanked me again, as I requested it to propel me to 75 MPH, 10 seconds out of my drive way. See, when you live 10 seconds from a 75 MPH speed limit, sometimes the truck is unhappy if you don't let it warm up. You're welcome truck. And thanks again for being warm for me.
 

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Okay??? It warms up faster. I’m pretty sure anyone would expect to see that.

Here’s a question. How much of a load does the manufacturer say I can put on a cold engine? And what would they like me to use to measure the load?

---------- Post added at 07:16 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:13 AM ----------

Oh, and I ask this as my truck is outside running, waiting to take the kids to school. I’m killing it! Ahhhhhh. Nah, I’m really not. It’ll be fine, just like engines have been since the beginning of engines. Lol

---------- Post added at 07:17 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:16 AM ----------

Oh and it still has the straight pennzoil conventional oil in it, that FCA engineers seems to think is fine for it when they built it.

---------- Post added at 07:54 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:17 AM ----------

So here's how my test went.


My truck ran for an unknown amount of time, because I really don't care enough to put the effort into timing it, and when I opened the door, this rush of warm, comforting air hit me in the face. I quickly climbed in and shut the door, trying to let as little of the warm air out as possible. As soon as my ass hit the seat, and my hands hit the steering wheel, I thought to myself, damn that's warm! Well, those are both electricslly heated items, but having the air around them warm was also nice.


I took my time getting situated in the truck, not in a hurry, because I wasn't freezing my ass off, and when I reached down to put the truck in drive, I knew the engine was warm and ready to go, because it told me so. It thanked me again, as I requested it to propel me to 75 MPH, 10 seconds out of my drive way. See, when you live 10 seconds from a 75 MPH speed limit, sometimes the truck is unhappy if you don't let it warm up. You're welcome truck. And thanks again for being warm for me.
Look man, it's your vehicle. Do with it as you wish. As we said, you're not going to kill it doing that. I make my decisions about my cars based on my experience, as do you. I've experienced -20* startups that made the engine make awful screaming noises, and I'd rather not let that happen to my personal vehicles, so I use synthetic oil and that's what I run with. Not trying to "prove" anything, just sharing the info I have.
 
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