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Faster than my X
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Basically looking for a torque wrench to bolt down my heads once my shortblock gets here:bubba:(note:I have a cheap northern torque wrench already).also to set the timing,and degree cams.what should I look for when buying another one?
 

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I'm a personal fan of everything craftsman. I use a click style myself. But the digital ones are nice also


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At work I use snap on digital torque wrenches with the torque angle built in...great for tty (stretch) bolts...they are expensive tho...
 

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i used a cornwell on my heads and have used a craftsman (cost about $120) on several head gasket jobs on subarus w/ no problems
 

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Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
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Matco click style. Digital would be awesome except sending it off every year to get calibrated



Not sent from a stupid Apple device
 

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I bought mine from a Tool store then tested its accuracy against a High dollar Snap on one I use at work. The one I bought from harbour freight was just as accurate best 50$ I ever bought.
 

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Lexus FTW
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I bought mine from a Tool store then tested its accuracy against a High dollar Snap on one I use at work. The one I bought from harbour freight was just as accurate best 50$ I ever bought.
but for how long? I have had bad luck with cheap tools. I personally like craftsman overall. Good quality at a good price
 

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I have been using it for over 2 years and it is still accurate, you will find that some of the specialty tools come right out of the same factory with different grips and stuff for thier specifying customers.
 

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HF makes a digital torque adapter that is very accurate--a claimed ± 2.0%, however my dead weight testing found it to be better than that. This is more accurate than any clicker you can buy.



I do not use it as a torquing tool, however I do use it as a standard against which I calibrate the various clickers and digital wrenches I have. FWIW I have also found the HF torque wrenches to be as accurate as any others...
 

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HF makes a digital torque adapter that is very accurate--a claimed ± 2.0%, however my dead weight testing found it to be better than that. This is more accurate than any clicker you can buy.



I do not use it as a torquing tool, however I do use it as a standard against which I calibrate the various clickers and digital wrenches I have. FWIW I have also found the HF torque wrenches to be as accurate as any others...
I can't complain about the.accuracy of my Harbor Freight torque wrench. some of the tools they sell there are actually very good quality. several years ago I bought a floor nailer for installing hardwood floor and I have put a lot of hardwood down with thatfloor nailer and never had a problem with it. yet it was half the price of a floor nailer anywhere else
 

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My step-son and I were discussing this just yesterday. While Snap-On, MAC, an a very few others are still top-of-the-line (in quality and price), Craftsman tools are a mere shadow of what they once were and overpriced to boot. Harbor Freight's wrenches, if you avoid the real cheap happy-homeowner crap, as good as or better than Craftsman--at 2/3 to 1/2 the price.

And they are all, except some (not all) of the Snap-On, etc line, made in China now--so much as it pains me I have decided to be "over that..."
 

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Carving corners
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My step-son and I were discussing this just yesterday. While Snap-On, MAC, an a very few others are still top-of-the-line (in quality and price), Craftsman tools are a mere shadow of what they once were and overpriced to boot. Harbor Freight's wrenches, if you avoid the real cheap happy-homeowner crap, as good as or better than Craftsman--at 2/3 to 1/2 the price.

And they are all, except some (not all) of the Snap-On, etc line, made in China now--so much as it pains me I have decided to be "over that..."
I have a HF in lbs TW and after doing a dead weight test it was off by 18 in lbs

My Great Neck Ft LB TW was balls on.

That being said now that I know its about 7% off its still usable but its something that should be done prior to using it that way nothing would be under torqued, also for paying 10.00 for the HF wrench I guess I cant complain.
 

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I have a HF in lbs TW and after doing a dead weight test it was off by 18 in lbs

My Great Neck Ft LB TW was balls on.

That being said now that I know its about 7% off its still usable but its something that should be done prior to using it that way nothing would be under torqued, also for paying 10.00 for the HF wrench I guess I cant complain.
18 lb-in at what setting (just curious, at 7% error it sounds as though you were near the top of its range)?

There is a small port on the wrench body through which you can calibrate the HF wrench, pull off the plastic cap and there is a calibration screw:



"Clicker" torque wrenches, except the beam type, need to be calibrated at least once every two years--more frequently if often used. It is also important to back off the torque setting after using the wrench. I back it off all the way and then tighten the adjustment just up until you can start to feel resistance--this will leave the torque mechanism engaged, but the spring minimally loaded.
 

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Carving corners
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18 lb-in at what setting (just curious, at 7% error it sounds as though you were near the top of its range)?

There is a small port on the wrench body through which you can calibrate the HF wrench, pull off the plastic cap and there is a calibration screw:



"Clicker" torque wrenches, except the beam type, need to be calibrated at least once every two years--more frequently if often used. It is also important to back off the torque setting after using the wrench. I back it off all the way and then tighten the adjustment just up until you can start to feel resistance--this will leave the torque mechanism engaged, but the spring minimally loaded.
thats at 260 in-lbs, i did not know about the calibration screw nice info.

I follow that procedure with my TW although i did leave my great neck at 60 ft lbs for a over a year by accident and its still accurate. Thanks for the info
 

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7% error at either extreme of a clicker wrench's range is not uncommon, Snap-On only guarantees ± 4.0% for their clickers. MAC says ± 3.0%.

It is best to select a torque wrench so that the desired torque will fall within 25% to 80% of its full range. I have not mapped one in years (like 30 maybe) however back then I found accuracy at the extremes to be off by as much as to 30%, even more...
 

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Carving corners
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7% error at either extreme of a clicker wrench's range is not uncommon, Snap-On only guarantees ± 4.0% for their clickers. MAC says ± 3.0%.

It is best to select a torque wrench so that the desired torque will fall within 25% to 80% of its full range. I have not mapped one in years (like 30 maybe) however back then I found accuracy at the extremes to be off by as much as to 30%, even more...
i'm sorry it was actually at 126 in-lbs , 11lb weight x 11.5in, and its the 20-200 inch-lb wrench which would put it right at the 70% range of the wrenches range
 
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