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2003 Sonic Money Pit
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I have a blown 03 GT and live in Southern California so during the summer time I have BIG temp issues on track that prevent me from going from about May to October time frame because on track temps are typically over 105 deg f. To help combat the heat I've tried using a larger radiator from fluidyne which only helped me slightly and I am still barfing coolant after a few hot laps. Does anyone else here have any experience with this and can weigh in on if putting in a oil cooler would benefit me enough to keep me on track? The sessions are only around 20 minutes so it isn't like I am doing endurance racing but it would be nice to finish my run session at the same time as everyone else and not is a cloud of steam.
 

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King Trashmouth
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21,891 Posts
Pretty unlikely. Oil is typically a smaller contribution of coolant heat rejection, especially on the GTs that don't have a big liquid to liquid cooler to begin with. Even if you put one on, you're just dumping that heat in front of the radiator, so you're not doing much good.

The existing package leaves a lot to be desired. There's huge gaps around the sides of it for recirculation. Block those off. In addition you can box in the radiator to make sure all that air from the grille gets forced through the cooling package. Going to a heat extractor hood like the Cobra will help move more air as well.

The last part is the fan. If you're running at high road speed then it won't make a huge difference. If it's lower speed, below 30mph a lot, then you could benefit. There's some pretty good upgrades out there off of other Ford models, like the MKVIII, Contour, and Taurus.
 

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2003 Sonic Money Pit
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262 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Pretty unlikely. Oil is typically a smaller contribution of coolant heat rejection, especially on the GTs that don't have a big liquid to liquid cooler to begin with. Even if you put one on, you're just dumping that heat in front of the radiator, so you're not doing much good.

The existing package leaves a lot to be desired. There's huge gaps around the sides of it for recirculation. Block those off. In addition you can box in the radiator to make sure all that air from the grille gets forced through the cooling package. Going to a heat extractor hood like the Cobra will help move more air as well.

The last part is the fan. If you're running at high road speed then it won't make a huge difference. If it's lower speed, below 30mph a lot, then you could benefit. There's some pretty good upgrades out there off of other Ford models, like the MKVIII, Contour, and Taurus.
Ya ducting the rad has been on the list but again not too sure how much of an improvement will come from that. I am saving up for a Coyote swap as building a better 2v doesn't really gain me anything in the cooling department so I am trying to limit the amount of time/money I dump on the current setup as it is going out the door sometime soon hopefully.. Also the Tiger Racing hood is on that list as well, just need $1,300 for it haha. The track I frequent is called Willow Springs, they have multiple tracks besides the one called Big Willow (main course). I typically end up racing on the smaller course (Streets of Willow) where speeds are typically quite slow with only a few corners that dip you below the 30 mph mark.
 

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I swapped my bumper support crash bar with one from donovan racing, it really opened up the area I front of my intercooler/condensor/radiator. It may or may not help.

 
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Boxing in the radiator will make the biggest difference and not cost much money if you already have an aftermarket radiator. I used plastic sheeting, rubber foam gasket with the adhesive one one side, rivets and zipties to box mine in. All that can come from the Home Depot Racing department. You should be able to hold a tissue up in front of the grille and have it sucked in towards the radiator when the fan comes on. Make sure your A/C condenser's fins are straight and not clogged up. That air has to pass through the A/C condenser before it makes any effect on the radiator. Although the fan only does work at low speed, make sure it is sealed well against the radiator. If you still have a gap between the front bumper and the bottom of the radiator, meaning you haven't sealed it off like most new cars are these days, then you need to have an air dam on the bottom of the radiator support that will force air up and into the radiator and a low pressure area behind it to draw air out the back of the radiator. The stock one works. A larger one works better. I made one out of a right angle metal, some garden edging, and rubber wall baseboard. All that can come from Home Depot Racing again, cheap.
 

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What radiator you running? the mishimoto Radiator really seems to get the job done and i think its about 1/2 inch thicker then the stock one.
 
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