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Would wraping intake be worth it? i know it picks up a decent amount of heat the travel threw the engine bay. But is it enough to wrap it.
 

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I wondered this and looked it up in the past and most people say that it is a waste of time. :dunno
 

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trash
 

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Interesting idea. I'm eventually going F/I so I'd consider wrapping my BBK CAI just to see if there's any seat of the pants difference at all. Although with how fast air is flowing at WOT, I doubt a hot CAI tube would have any time to heat it much above ambient temps.

Kinda something that'd be neat to try for shits and giggles, but in reality a fresh air filter would offer more.
 

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King Trashmouth
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Would wraping intake be worth it? i know it picks up a decent amount of heat the travel threw the engine bay. But is it enough to wrap it.
You might only see a difference if you've got extremely high underhood temps and are using an aluminum CAI. If you don't have serious heat soak or have a composite CAI I don't think it would do much. But even in the worst case scenario I don't see the difference being more than a few degrees.
 

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Four Wheeler magazine did a comparison test on a stock F-series pickup with factory air box and intake. They found the best power came from using a stock intake set-up with a K&N drop-in filter and insulating wrap around the air box and tubes. It did even better than the K&N FIPK. Here's a link..........the whole article is a pretty fun read.

FOUR WHEELER Magazine's Project M.P.G.
 

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Four Wheeler magazine did a comparison test on a stock F-series pickup with factory air box and intake. They found the best power came from using a stock intake set-up with a K&N drop-in filter and insulating wrap around the air box and tubes. It did even better than the K&N FIPK. Here's a link..........the whole article is a pretty fun read.

FOUR WHEELER Magazine's Project M.P.G.
interesting to hear!

I know it was the same on the SVT Focus's... the best intake is the stock intake unit with the drop in K&N filter. Thought I heard that the factory mustang intake with drop in K&N filter (and something else removed?) was as good if not better than most aftermarket intakes for the 99-04' mustangs but I could be wrong...
 

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lets just nip this in the butt now... please don't use a leaf blower on your car either
Leaf blowers are low tech bullshit. Noisey, non intercooled. What you do is stick an air conditioner in your backseat, route the cold air to the intake..
 

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^^^ IIRC, Ford's SVT had actually designed a system that would use the air conditioner to "super cool" and store a small volume of water. When activated, it would release the cold water through the intercooler for a short burst. I believe it was designed & tested for the final generation Lightning which never made production. Not sure about the details, but I remember reading about it in an interview with John Coletti several years ago.
 

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As mentioned previously, spend your time and money elsewhere.

John
 

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honestly how long do you think air remains in your intake while the engine is running?
I'm so glad I'm not the only one on this forum that realizes that. I bring it up every time someone tries to bash metal intakes vs plastic claiming heat soak. People like to think the air is just chilling out in the pipe when in reality it's moving at a pretty high velocity.
 

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King Trashmouth
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I'm so glad I'm not the only one on this forum that realizes that. I bring it up every time someone tries to bash metal intakes vs plastic claiming heat soak. People like to think the air is just chilling out in the pipe when in reality it's moving at a pretty high velocity.
Yes, but this means that it's forced convection. In forced convection the heat transfer coefficient is actually proportional to reynolds number, which is proportional to volumetric flow. So speeding up the flow won't actually decrease heat transfer.
 
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